The WW1 Roll of Honour:
Surnames G - H

 

Private 107512 Ernest James John Ganley

 

1st Bn, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby)

Killed in action 27th May 1918, Aged 19.

Commemorated Soissons Memorial, Aisne.

 

Ernest was the son of Alexander and Marguerite Ganley of 70 Woodgate, Loughborough. Ernest was a spinner and attested, aged 17, on 7th October 1916 at Loughborough. He was mobilised on 26th July 1917 and sent to France on 5th April 1918. He had only been in France for about six weeks when he was killed.

Private 54874 John Eli Gay

 

16th Bn, Welsh Regiment.

Formerly 35929 Essex Regiment.

Killed in action 1st August 1917, Aged 24.

Commemorated Ypres (Menin Gate)   Panel 37

 

John Eli Gay was born in St. Pancras, London, in late 1892 or early 1893. He was the son of Eli Gay and his wife Lucy Agnes (née Clare) who were married in Brighton in 1890. John's father was a Royal Mail driver and in 1901 the Gay family lived at 38 Lismore Road, Gospel Oak, London. By 1911 they had moved to no. 36 in the same road. John had one younger brother William and two sisters Mary and Maud. In 1911 John was an unemployed plumber but by the following year he had obtained employment as a gasfitter's assistant.

On 22nd December 1912 John married Mary Josephine Jessie Charlton at St. James' Church, Hampstead Road, London, and by 1915 they had two children Elsie and Frederick both born in London.

The exact date of John's enlistment is unknown as his service papers have not survived, but it seems likely to have been in the summer of 1916. He joined the Essex Regiment as Private 35929 and was subsequently transferred to the 16th (Cardiff City) Battalion of the Welsh Regiment as Private 54874. The date on which he was sent to France is also unknown although it is likely that he was in a draft of reinforcements joining the 16th Battalion in Boesinghe, a village north of Ypres, on 14th December 1916.

From mid-December 1916 until August 1917 the battalion mostly remained in the Boesinghe sector, apart from two weeks training at Merckeghem in both January and May 1917 and a further two weeks training at Febvin-Palfart in June. In the Boesinghe sector the battalion did front line trench tours, repaired and improved trenches and supplied working parties to assist the Royal Engineers.

On 31st July 1917 Haig opened the Passchendaele Offensive with an attack at Pilckem Ridge, near Boesinghe. On the second day of this battle John was killed in action. He was 24. He is commemorated on the Ypres Menin Gate Memorial, panel 37.

John's widow Mary was remarried to Samuel A. Sutton in 1919 in Loughborough. Samuel was a former Army friend of her late husband and the couple moved to 3 Railway Terrace and then Ratcliffe Road, Loughborough. In April 1920, however, Mary filed for a separation order as Samuel ill-treated her and was violent. In 1953 she married John Henry Toms and in 1954 went with him to live in Australia.
 

Private 37741 Edward Henry Genever

 

6th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 22nd March 1918,  Aged 19.

Commemorated Pozieres Memorial, Somme, panel 29 - 30.

 

Edward was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Genever of 37 Broad Street Loughborough. He was employed at the N.M.C. as a trimmer at the time of enlistment, Feb. 26th1917, and had been there over four years. He had been in France four months when he met his death.

Private 9829 John Henry Gibbins

 

2nd Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action Mesopotamia 7th January 1916, Aged 21.

Commemorated Basra Memorial panel 12.

 

 

John Henry Gibbins was born in Loughborough in 1894, the third son of William and Annie Gibbins who were married in Loughborough in 1886. John had five brothers Philip, Bernard, Francis, Cecil and Reginald and two sisters Nellie and Lucy. John's father was a farm labourer in 1891, become a groom by 1901, and progressed to being a farm foreman by 1911. The family initially lived in Forest Road, Nanpantan, but by 1911 had moved to Bawdon Lodge, Charley Cross Roads, Loughborough.

John became a farm labourer and attested for the Leicestershire Regiment in the autumn of 1913. In September 1914 he was posted as Private 9829 to the 3rd Leicesters at Portsmouth. On 7th December 1914 he was sent to France to join the 2nd Leicesters who had arrived in France from India.

In 1915 John took part in the Battles of Neuve Chapelle (10th-13th March), but missed fighting with his battalion at Aubers Ridge (9th May), the first day of the Battle of Festubert, as he was in hospital. The 2nd Leicesters spent the next couple of months alternately in the trenches or in billets while war training, in the area of Calonne and Vieille Chapelle north-east of Bethune. On 17th July John was once again hospitalised with German measles. He rejoined his battalion just over two weeks later which at the time was being rested in a quiet sector before being deployed for the Battle of Loos.

The initial attack at Loos was made by three divisions, with the Meerut Division leading the attack on the Indian Front. Blackader's brigade, with two Gurkha battalions and the 2nd Leicesters was on its right flank. Whilst the attack successfully crossed no-man's land under cover of the barrage, the right flank of the brigade was caught up in defensive wire and only one battalion successfully made its way into the German trenches. Gas also affected some of the men and the smoke caused a dense fog, making direction difficult. John was fortunate to survive the initial attack at the Battle of Loos on 25th September 1915 - from his battalion 72 men were killed, 217 were wounded, 42 were gassed and 96 were recorded as missing.

The 2nd Battalion was rather depleted after the Battle of Loos, but was ordered to the Persian Gulf where Britain was fighting Turkish forces allied to the Germans. On 10th November 1915 John embarked at Marseilles and arrived at Basra on 8th December 1915. From there he travelled by boat up the River Tigris to Ali Gharbi, 150 miles south-east of Baghdad.

In Mesopotamia General Townshend and his troops were under siege at Kut. On January 4th 1916 General Aylmer's leading troops, under Major General Younghusband, began to advance from Ali Gharbi towards Sheikh Sa'ad, with the intention of relieving General Townshend at Kut.

The Turkish commander Nur-Ur-Din had, however, effectively blocked any progress by placing approximately 22,500 troops and 72 guns on both banks of the Tigris at Sheikh Sa'ad, about 16 miles downstream from Kut. General Aylmer therefore ordered an attack on the enemy and very heavy fighting ensued on 7th January at the Battle of Sheikh Sa'ad, during which John was killed. He was just 21.

John is commemorated on the Basra Memorial, Iraq, Panel 12. He is also remembered on St. Mary's in Charnwood Churchyard Memorial, Nanpantan, and on the memorials at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, and St Peters Church, Copt Oak, as well as on the Carillon.

Gunner 83903 George Giles

 

Coast Defences (Tee Garrison) Royal Garrison Artillery.

Died at Normanhurst Hospital 7th April 1918, Aged 28.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery, 44/302. 

 

George was the son of Mrs. S. E. Giles, of Fern Cottage, Nottingham Road, Loughborough.

 

Corporal 568012 Sidney Lewis Gilks

 

Base Signal Depot, Royal Engineers.

Died of Pneumonia Egypt 2nd November 1918,  Aged 24.

Buried Jerusalem War Cemetery, W. 15. 

 

Sidney was the son of Joseph & Harriett Ann Gilks of 12 Arthur Street, Loughborough.

Private 40902 John Henry Gimson

 

8th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 6th October 1917, Aged 38.

Commemorated Tyne Cot Memorial panel 50 - 51.

 

John was the son of Mr. John & Sarah Gimson of 31 Hasting Street, Loughborough, His wife lived in the Dog & Gunyard. He was formerly a Stonemason.

Captain Walter Stanley Gimson M.C.

 

Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry.

Killed in Action 16th August 1917, Aged 32.

Buried Bard Cottage  Cemetery, Ieper. IV. B. 48. 

 

Walter Stanley Gimson was born in Leicester on 3rd March 1885. He was the son of William Gimson, a timber merchant, and his wife Martha (née Williams) who were married at St. Peter's Church, North Rauceby, Lincolnshire, on 11th April 1876. Walter had four brothers William, Henry, Edward and Albert, and four sisters Emily, Annie, Mary and Margery. In 1891 the family was living at 110 Regent Road, Leicester, but by 1901 had moved to Rothesay, Victoria Road (now University Road), Leicester.

Walter became a cabinet maker and for some years was a principal in the firm Gimson and Slater, cabinet makers of Nottingham. Walter became well-known in Nottingham and was a prominent playing member of the Notts Rugby Club as well as a keen cricketer and golfer. In Nottingham he boarded with the Slater family at Hawthorns, Dagmar Grove, Alexandra Park. He subsequently moved to 9 Forest Road, Loughborough, and joined the Longcliffe Golf Club.

At the outbreak of war Walter enlisted with the Nottingham athletes in the Sherwood Foresters and joined the 10th (Service) Battalion as Private 17286. He was soon promoted to the rank of Corporal and then Sergeant. The precise dates of his enlistment and promotions, however, are unknown.

The 10th Battalion was formed at Derby in September 1914 and came under orders of 51st Brigade in 17th (Northern) Division of the Army. The battalion moved to Wool, Dorset, and on to West Lulworth in October 1914, returning to Wool in December. In June 1915 the battalion moved to Winchester for final training. On 14th July 1915 the battalion travelled to Folkestone and on 15th July landed at Boulogne.

From St. Omer the battalion moved to Reninghelst and went into the trenches near Hooge on 27th July. Further trench tours followed in August with a break at Ouderdom. By September the battalion was in Sanctuary Wood repairing trenches and was heavily shelled by the enemy on several occasions. On 25th September the enemy began a particularly fierce attack on Sanctuary Wood and two counter-attacks failed. On October 6th the battalion was withdrawn to Eecke and Caestre for two weeks rest but was back in the trenches at Sanctuary Wood by 21st October. November began with working parties for the Royal Engineers, followed by trench tours at Ypres. On the 22nd November 1915 Walter was admitted to hospital suffering from influenza. He was discharged on the 25th November and returned to duty.

On 14th December enemy shelling cut all wires on the Allied front, blew in all dugouts on the front and support line. This was followed by a phosgene gas attack and an assault by German raiding parties. Walter admitted to hospital again on 14th December, this time with a shrapnel wound in his side. He was transferred to the Divisional Rest Station three days later.

It seems likely that Walter returned to his battalion sometime in early January 1916 while they were undergoing reorganisation and training at Houlle. The battalion left Houlle by rail for Poperinghe on 5th February and marched to Ouderdom before going into the trenches north of the Ypres-Comines canal in an area known as the Bluff. Here on the night of the 14th/15th February the Germans began an extensive shelling operation before invading the front and support lines of the Allies. Counter-attacks were again unsuccessful and the 10th Sherwood Foresters suffered heavy casualties. A further counter-attack on 2nd March, however, achieved better results. From 7th-18th March the battalion was in training at La Crèche.

On 15th March 1916 Walter received a commission as a Temporary 2nd Lieutenant in the King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry). On 23rd May 1916 he was transferred to the General List for duty with Trench Mortar Batteries and on 30th July 1916 he was promoted to Acting Captain while commanding the 61st Trench Mortar Battery, part of the 61st Brigade of the 20th (Light) Division. Walter joined the 61st Trench Mortar Battery in the line in the Ypres area. Front-line trench mortars, known in the British Army as 'flying pigs' played an important role in any attack as they were always certain to draw enemy fire.

In the New Year's Honours List on the 1st January 1917 Walter was awarded the Military Cross 'for an act or acts of exemplary gallantry during active operations against the enemy'.

Between April and June 1917 while on leave from the front Walter married Isabel Beatrice Soher (née Moss) at Fulham Register Office, London. Isabel was the daughter of Edwin Moss of Loughborough and in 1914 was divorced from her first husband Le Roy Soher, an American car mechanic with Straker and Squire. Walter and Isabel had only been married for a few months when Walter, aged 32, was killed in action on 16th August 1917, the first day of the Battle of Langemarck.

Communicating the news of his death to his wife a fellow officer said: 'Gimson was one of the most popular officers in the Division and when killed in the advance towards Langemarck was acting like a hero'.

Walter is buried in Bard Cottage Cemetery, near Ypres, Grave IV. B. 48. A group of members of the Longcliffe Golf Club visited his grave and placed a wreath on behalf of the members of the golf club. Walter's name was also added to his parents' headstone in Welford Road Cemetery, Leicester.

Walter's widow died in County Armagh, Northern Ireland, in 1927.
 

Corporal 8608 John Marshall Glover

 

2nd Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in action 25th September 1915, Aged 23.

Commemorated Loos Memorial panel 42 - 44.

 

John Marshall Glover was born Barton in Fabis, Nottinghamshire, in 1891. He was the only son of James Glover and Ellen Glover (née Marshall) who were married in 1889 in Barton in Fabis. John's father was a farm labourer who subsequently became a labourer in a limestone quarry and his mother was a hosiery seamer. John had three sisters Kate, Edith and Jane and between 1891 and 1901 the family moved from Barton to Loughborough Road, East Leake. After John's father died sometime between 1901 and 1911 his widowed mother moved to 5 Steeple Row, Loughborough, with her youngest daughter Jane.

On 4th January 1909 John, a labourer, attested at Loughborough and on 9th January joined the 1st Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 8608. He was stationed at Shorncliffe, near Cheriton, Kent, for a year and then sent to Aldershot. On 15th August 1911 he was found fit for service in India and subsequently posted to the 2nd Leicesters. On 27th November 1911 he sailed for India on the HMT Dongola, arriving there on 2nd January 1912. He remained in India until October 1914 and served in various locations including Madras, Wellington, Bareilly and Ranikhet.

When war broke out the 2nd Leicesters were brought from India to France as the British Battalion of the Garhwal Brigade of the 7th Indian Division. They arrived in Marseilles on 11th October 1914 and travelled north to the war zone. They were one of the units chosen to spearhead the allied assault at Neuve Chapelle (10th-13th March 1915).

Along with their Indian comrades the 2nd Leicesters attacked the German position known as Port Arthur, near La Bombe crossroads. The Garhwal Brigade's Indian battalions were held up by uncut wire, but the 2nd Battalion of the Tigers led the attack on the right and smashed a way through or over all obstacles and quickly overwhelmed the enemy holding the trenches covering the village and woods at Neuve Chapelle. John, who had been appointed a Lance Corporal at the beginning of the year, was unfortunately wounded in the thigh and hand in this battle. From No. 19 field ambulance he was sent to No. 2 Hospital in Boulogne and from there to England. He remained in England until late May when he rejoined the 2nd Leicesters in France where the corps was being rested in a quiet sector until it was deployed for the Battle of Loos.

John had been promoted to the rank of Corporal in August 1915, but this new position was short-lived. He died on the 25th September, the first day of the Battle of Loos.

Private 241814 (Stretcher Bearer) John William Godber

 

2/5th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 16th April 1917, Aged 21.

Buried Roisel Communal Cemetery SP. Memorial 10.

 

 

John William Godber, known as 'Billy' to his family, was born on 22nd January 1896 in East Leake, Nottinghamshire and baptised at St. Mary's Church, East Leake, on 31st October 1897. He was the eldest son of John Thomas Godber and his wife Henrietta (née Smith) who were married in Loughborough in 1895. Billy had three brothers Sidney, Morton and Harold and four sisters Beatrice, Doris, Sarah and Hilda. Billy never knew his brother Harold who was born about the time he was killed in France in 1917. Billy's father was a basket maker but in later life he was an engineering works stores labourer. For much of his youth Billy's family lived at Loughborough Road, East Leake, but they later moved to 10 Thomas Street and then to 98 Wharncliffe Road both in Loughborough. In 1911 Billy was a grocer's assistant at the Maypole Dairy in Market Place, Loughborough.

According to Billy's youngest sister Hilda (the late Mrs. Onions) who was only seven when Billy died his parents were extremely upset when Billy joined up to serve in the First World War. Billy's date of enlistment is not known as his service records have not survived but he joined the 2/5th (Territorial) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 4881 (later renumbered as Private 241814).

The 2/5th Battalion had its HQ in Loughborough as part of the Lincoln and Leicester Brigade, North Midland Division and was mobilised in September 1914. In January 1915 the battalion moved to Luton being billeted in private homes, and in February and March they were in Epping digging practice trenches. In July they moved to the St. Albans area, under canvas at Briton Camp for training and route marches. In August 1915, the Brigade was retitled 177th Brigade, 59th Division (2nd North Midland) and in October they were moved back to billets in Harpenden. Throughout 1915 some members of the 2/5th Leicesters also provided guards for the prisoner of war camp at Donington Hall.

In January 1916 parties of Officers were sent to France on tours of instruction in the trenches and in March, the long awaited orders to proceed overseas were received. On Easter Monday, however, the rebellion in Ireland forced a rapid change of plans.

The 177th Brigade was recalled from leave, ordered to Liverpool, and sailed for Ireland on the SS Ulster, a fast mailboat, escorted by a Royal Navy destroyer. Their first taste of action was not in the trenches of the Western Front, but in the streets of Dublin. By the end of the month the main uprising was over and the 2/5th Battalion were employed as search parties in Ballsbridge and guarded railways, bridges and other key infrastructure. On the 10th May they moved out of the city to tackle pockets of resistance in Co. Kerry. In June the Battalion told they would be moving to France and training resumed with long route marches through Ireland. In August they marched from Tralee to Fermoy Barracks, where they remained until January 1917, engaged in live fire training in trench warfare. The return trip from Ireland was made aboard the SS Ulster and they arrived at Fovant Camp in Wiltshire by train on 6th January 1917.

After embarkation leave they proceeded to France via Southampton, arriving at Le Havre on 24th February 1917. They were sent to the Somme area of Fouencamps and Morcourt where the enemy was retreating to the Hindenburg line. They made their first attack on the villages of Hesbecourt and Hervilly on 31st March 1917, capturing both villages and suffering a number of casualties.

In a letter to his fiancée, Maud, on 8th April 1917, Billy thanked her for the parcel she had sent him containing a copy of the Loughborough Echo, some bread, butter and eggs. He wrote: 'I am looking forward to coming back soon, I've had quite enough'.

Billy's battalion remained in the area of Hesbecourt and Hervilly and on 16th April, at Brosse Woods, the enemy opened a heavy barrage. Eight men were killed or died of wounds and Billy who was a stretcher bearer and carrying an injured comrade was killed by a sniper's bullet. He was 21 years old.

Billy was buried at Roisel Communal Cemetery Extension Sp. Memorial 10 and is remembered on the memorial from Holy Trinity Church, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon.

Billy's mother shared the honour with General Lord Home of laying the foundation stone of the Carillon.
William's last letter
 
 
Letter translated
 

Lance Corporal 12857 Walter Gould M.M

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 28th April 1918, Aged 27.

Buried Boulogne Eastern Cemetery IX. A. 51. 

 

Walter was the son of James & Fanny Gould of Loughborough, he lived with his Wife & Brother at 13 Wards End, Loughborough. Walter died in Hospital at Boulogne, from shell gas poisoning, He was employed at Messrs, Tuckers Ltd, prior to enlistment in 1914, and and was also an old Emmanuel boy. Lance. Corp. Gould was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the Somme battle of July 1916.

Ordinary Signalman J/26716(PO) Herbert Goulden

 

Silver Cross of the Order of St George 4th Class (Russia) 

H.M. Submarine E. 13. Royal Navy.

Killed in Action Saltholm 19th August 1915, Aged 18.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery 42-256 

 

 

Herbert Goulden was born on the 24thJune 1897, at 38 Blackwell Street, Stockport. He was the son of Joseph Goulden, a labourer and bricklayer, and his Dunedin-born wife Florence Isabella (née Genever). In 1901 Joseph's family was living at 19 Borron Street, Stockport, Cheshire. By 1909 the Gouldens and their children Florence, Herbert, Harry and William had moved to Loughborough where their relations lived and another daughter Mabel was born in 1909. When Joseph suddenly died in 1910, Florence supported herself and her children by working as a charwoman. She initially lived at 43 Mill Street in Loughborough but then moved to 33 Station Street. In 1923 Florence was remarried to George E.V. Woods in Loughborough.

In 1913, at the age of sixteen, he enlisted in the Royal Navy, and on the 23rdof August 1913, he joined H.M.S. Ganges. On his eighteenth birthday he signed on for a further twelve years service. He joined the crew of the submarine E.13 on the 11thJanuary 1915.

 Officer and crew of HMS/m 'E13' (E-class) April 1915

Front row, Left to Right: Stoker PO. ERA Staples. ERA Lukey, Lt. Eddis, Lt. Layton, Lt. Armstrong RNR, ERA Abrams (?) ERA Varcoe (?), PO LTO Bowden (?) or Lincoln. Middle row: Includes Ord. Sig. Goulden, Ord. Tel. Holt (?). Back row: Includes Stoker Yeardsley, Stoker Wilson.

On the 13th August 1915, after 3 days leave at Loughborough, Ordinary Signalman Goulden returned to Harwich to resume his duties. On the 15th August E13 sailed from Harwich at 1800 with E8 for the Baltic. On August 18th at 2300, due to compass failure, E13 ran aground on Saltholm Island, Denmark. Saltholm, an island about five miles long, is in the sound, six miles E.S.E. of Copenhagen and W.N.W. of Malmo in Sweden.

A Danish Torpedo boat appeared on the scene and communicated to E13, that she would be allowed a day to get herself refloated. At the same time a German Torpedo Destroyer arrived and remained close to E13, until two more Danish boats came close. The German boat then withdrew. While three Danish Torpedo boats were anchored close to E13, two German Torpedo boat Destroyers approached from the south. When about half a mile away one of these destroyers hoisted a commercial flag signal, but before the commanding officer Layton had time to read it the German Destroyer fired a Torpedo at her from a distance of about 300 yards, which exploded on hitting the bottom close to her.

At the same moment the German Destroyer fired with all her guns, and Lieutenant Commander Layton seeing that his Submarine was on fire, and unable to defend himself owing to being aground, gave orders for the crew to abandon her. While the men were in the water they were fired on by machine guns, and with shrapnel. One of the Danish torpedo boats immediately lowered her boats and steamed between the submarine and the German Destroyers, who therefore had to cease-fire and withdraw.
 

Casualties:

Discharged Dead from E13 on 19 August 1915

PO. W.G. Warren Sto. W.A. Yearsley Ord. Sig. H. Goulden Ord. Tel. B.S.C. Holt (aka E. S. Holt)
AB. H. Joyner AB. A.J. Payne AB. R.T. Smart LS. H.T. Pedder
ERA. H. Staples C. Sto. B. Pink Sto. T.C. Greenwood Sto. A. Long
L. Stc. W.H. Thomas Sto. W.T. Wilcox Sto. F. Wilson

 

 
E13 being towed into Copenhagen.
 

 

E13 alongside at Copenhagen, damaged.

 

E13 alongside at Copenhagen, August 1915, Note damage caused by German gunfire.

Herbert Goulden was awarded the Silver Cross Of St George 4th Class (Russia), for bravery in the face of the enemy. 

The British government accepted the offer of the Danish Admiralty to carry the fourteen bodies back to England. The mail steamer Vidar had been specially fitted out for this purpose. The Vidar's Salon was transformed into a temporary chapel, and before the departure a funeral service was held, alongside the Maritime Wharf. There was an affecting scene when the British sailors arrived, and many were moved to tears. The ceremony…was short, but impressive, the coffins were covered with hundreds of wreaths in Danish and British colours. Flags were flying at half-mast over the whole of Copenhagen.

The Vidar left for Hull, escorted by the Danish Torpedo boats, Springeren and Storen. Only fourteen bodies left Copenhagen on board SS Vidar (1 victim missing was later recovered and brought to England). SS Vidar arrived at Riverside Quay at 7.pm on August 27th. On Saturday morning at 10.00am, the fourteen coffins were transferred to fourteen horse drawn hearses, which were drawn to the Paragon Station. On entering the large gateway to the Station yard, the coffins were arranged in a row. A shooting party fired a volley over the bodies and the "Last Post" was sounded.

 

Reception of E13 victims in Hull

 

Reception of E13 victim in Hull, Floral tributes.

Funeral procession in Hull of submarine E13 heroes.

The coffins of Herbert Goulden and his fellow blue jackets were placed on a train, and sent to the following places: Seven to Gosport, one each to York, Pembroke, Loughborough, Wimbourne, London and Verwood. Herbert Goulden's body, enclosed in a massive coffin on which was a plate bearing the name of the young blue jacket, arrived in Loughborough by the Great Central Railway on Saturday and was removed to the lad's home in Station Street. With the remains also came no less than 72 floral tributes, including the beautiful wreath inscribed "In memory of the brave blue jackets who gave up their lives for King and Country from Alexandra". There were tributes from Russia, Belgium, Denmark, France, and the members of the Hull exchange. Another wreath bore the inscription "We salute you Crew of E13, your immortal example can but encourage Briton's sons to deeds of similar valour for the honour of old England".

Ordinary Signalman Herbert Goulden's funeral took place on Monday 30th August 1915. A strong detachment of the 3/5th Leicestershire Regiment attended the funeral. The Parade lined up in Station Street as a bodyguard and escorted the funeral party to St. Peter's Church. The coffin was covered with the Navel Ensign, on which were two wreaths, and the deceased Sailor's cap. A service was held at the church; afterwards the body was conveyed to Loughborough cemetery for interment in plot 42, section 256. Sailors on leave followed the coffin to the graveside. The 3/5th Leicesters provided the bearers and a detachment of the same battalion fired volleys over the grave after the interment.

On the 26th May 1916 Mrs. Henshaw [sic. or rather Woods] (formerly Goulden) 33 Station Street Loughborough, received her son's award of the silver Cross of St George; enclosed with the order was a diploma from the Chapter of the Russian Imperial and Royal Orders, printed in the Russian language.

'E13's' bell is currently on display at the RN Submarine Museum, Gosport. A section of HP airline from 'E13', pierced by German machine-gun bullets when she was stranded on Saltholm Island, is currently on display at the RN Submarine Museum. It was presented to the museum by Admiral Layton, her CO at the time. Lt. Cdr. Layton later rose to become Vice Admiral Sir Geoffrey Layton. Lt. Cdr. Eddis was in charge of L24 when she was sunk with all hands after collision with the battleship Resolution on 10 Jan 1924.
 

 

 
Herbert Goulden's final resting-place, Loughborough cemetery.

Private 203861 Ernest Albert Grant

 

7th Bn, Lincolnshire Regiment.

Killed in Action 21st March 1918, Aged 31.

Commemorated Arras Memorial, bay 3 & 4.

 

Ernest was the son of John and Kate Grant of Quorn. After Ernest's father died in 1908 his mother moved the family to 128 Howard Road, Leicester, and Ernest was employed as a shoe stockroom hand. Ernest married in 1914 and left a wife Florence and two young daughters, Gertrude and Phyllis, who lived at 1 Church Lane, Quorn.

Corporal 10554 Fred William Grant

 

2nd Bn, Leicestershire Regiment

Killed in Action 15th May 1915, Aged 23.

Commemorated Le Touret Memorial, panel 11.

 

Fred William Grant was born in Enderby, Leicestershire, in 1891, the oldest son of Edward Grant and Mary Jane Grant (née Follows). Fred had two younger brothers Sidney and Harold, and two younger sisters Elsie and Ivy. By 1901 the family had moved to Stone Quarry Lodge, Stanton and Fred's father was an engine driver in the quarry. By 1911 the family had moved again and were living at 24 Grange Street, Loughborough, Fred's father having secured an engine driving job with the Borough Council. Fred had begun an apprenticeship as an iron founder (moulder).

On 29th December 1909, however, Fred had attested at Leicester and joined the 3rd Leicestershire Regiment Territorial Force. In the summer of 1910 he had been specially trained in musketry and he was promoted from Private to Corporal on 8th August 1914. He embarked for France on 19th March 1915 and joined the 2nd Leicesters in the field. Less than two months later he was wounded in action, reported missing on 15th May 1915 after a military operation north-east of Bethune 'and was regarded for official purposes as having died'.

Private 31270 Samuel David Grant

 

7th Bn, South Lancashire Regiment.

Formerly 28264 Leicestershire Regiment.

Died at Home 11th December 1916, Aged 32.

Buried Horninglow (St. John) Churchyard, Staffordshire, Grave 242.

 

Samuel David Grant was born in Shepshed in 1884. He was the son of David Grant and his wife Emma (née Driver) who were married in the Barrow on Soar registration area in 1877. The Grants had eleven children, only seven of whom survived infancy. Samuel had two brothers William and Ernest and four sisters Eliza, Lucy, Ethel and Gladys. Samuel's father was a traction driver. In 1891 the family lived in Warner Street, Loughborough. By 1901 they had moved to 5 Granville Street and by 1911 to 54 Station Road. In 1911 Samuel was a general labourer.

In the late spring of 1916 Samuel married Annie Newman from Horninglow, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire, in Loughborough. The couple were not together for long, however, as Samuel enlisted with the Leicestershire Regiment in May 1916 as Private 28264. From the Leicestershire Regiment Samuel was almost immediately transferred to the 7th (Service) Battalion of the Prince of Wales's Volunteers (South Lancashire Regiment) as Private 31270 and sent to France in late August 1916.

Samuel joined the 7th Battalion in the field near Locre, West Flanders. On 3rd September the battalion moved to billets in the Romerin area of De Seule before moving to provide support in Ploegsteert Wood the following day. After the enemy shelled the wood they moved to nearby billets and then to camp at De Seule before proceeding to Outtersteene, France, and the training camp at St. Omer. At this point Samuel was sent to hospital for one day with dental problems. On 5th October the battalion entrained at Bailleul for Doullens and marched to billets at St. Léger-lés-Authie.

From 7th-11th October the battalion was in the front line trenches near Hébuterne where they were on the receiving end of shelling and Minenwerfer. From 11th-16th they were in shelters at Coigneux for training and attack rehearsals after which they marched to Contay on 18th. On 22nd they moved to the front line trenches north of Albert and during the move 7 ordinary ranks were killed and 28 ordinary ranks and 4 officers were wounded. After two days they went to billets in Aveluy before relieving troops at Wood Post and Leipzig Redoubt and then transferring to the front line on 30th October for two days.

When they were relieved on 1st November the transfer process was the most difficult they had so far experienced. The relief battalion was three hours late arriving; the enemy was shelling the communication trenches and the rain was torrential. After a beak at Aveluy they were back in the trenches on 5th November and amidst continuous enemy shelling.

Zero day for a planned attack had finally been settled as 13th November, and on 12th the battalion moved to Ovillers to stand ready. By the end of the Battle of the Ancre on 18th November 6 officers in the battalion had been killed and 6 wounded and of the ordinary ranks 14 had been killed, 80 wounded and 26 were missing. It is likely that Samuel was wounded in this battle and brought back to England. He died in hospital in Sheffield on 11th December 1916, aged 32.

Samuel is remembered on the memorial at the Church of St. John the Divine, Horninglow, on the memorial in the former St, Peter's Church building, Loughborough, and on the Carillon.

Samuel's wife Annie gave birth to their only daughter Elsie in late 1916; whether Samuel ever saw her is not known. In 1916 Annie had lost not only her first husband but also two of her brothers William and Arthur Newman who were killed within four days of each other in July on the Somme. Annie had another daughter Phyllis in 1918 in Burton-on-Trent and married a widower John Cheadle in 1919. With John Cheadle she had at least six more children
need photo

Corporal 297435 Thomas Bertie Graves

 

157th Heavy Bty, Royal Garrison Artillery.

Died Persian Gulf 21st August 1917, Aged 33.

Buried Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Iraq, VI. D. 10.

 

Thomas Bertie Graves was born at 30 East Laith Gate, Doncaster, Yorkshire in 1884 and baptised at Christ Church, Doncaster, on 21st September 1884. His parents were George Graves, a blacksmith, and Susan Graves (née Robson) who were married on 28th October 1876 at St. George's Church, Doncaster. Thomas had three brothers George, Henry and Richard and two sisters Lillie and Helen. Two other sisters Alice and Annie died young. By 1891 the family had moved to Britannia Terrace, 6 East Laith Gate and by 1901 to the Horse and Groom, 15, East Laith Gate. In 1901 Thomas was a burcher's apprentice. Thomas's parents later moved to 40 Rockwood Road, Wheatley, Doncaster.

On 4th September 1905 Thomas, now a butcher at Ranmoor, Sheffield, married Martha Ann Corbett at the Church of St. John the Baptist, Chapeltown, near Ecclesfield, Yorkshire. By 1911 the young couple had moved to 5 Meadow Lane, Loughborough, and Thomas was manager of a butcher's shop, working in the service of the British and Argentine Meat Company. Thomas and Martha later moved to 5 Albert Promenade. They had two daughters Edna and Jessie but Edna sadly died aged one.

Thomas probably enlisted in late 1915. The exact date of his enlistment at Leicester is unknown as his service papers have not survived. He had previously been a member of the Volunteer Training Corps in Loughborough, and was quickly promoted to the rank of Corporal. He joined 157 Heavy Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery.

Heavy Batteries were equipped with heavy guns, sending large calibre high explosive shells in fairly flat trajectory fire. The usual armaments were 60 pounder (5 inch) guns, although some had obsolescent 5 inch howitzers. As British artillery tactics developed, the Heavy Batteries were most often employed in destroying or neutralising the enemy artillery, as well as putting destructive fire down on strongpoints, dumps, store, roads and railways behind enemy lines.

In early April 1916 Thomas's battery was at Hornsea, Lincolnshire. On 20th April the battery moved to Winchester on 29th May, to Bordon, Hampshire, for mobilization and then to Larkhill, Wiltshire, for firing practice. After returning to Bordon at the beginning of July the battery went to Devonport and on 11th July sailed on HMT Nestor for Bombay. The battery arrived in Bombay on 4th August and had two days for acclimitisation at Kinkee before embarking on HMT Janus for Basra.

The war diary for 157 Heavy Battery for 9th August to 31st October 1916 has been lost, but the record resumes on 1st November when the battery was at Makina, Basra. In Mesopotamia, under General Maude's reorganisation, the battery was now in the 3rd Corps, 14th Division.

On 23rd November the battery embarked on Steamer P24 for Sheikh Saad. From Sheikh Saad the battery marched via Serin Banks and Shafi to Kurna at the confluence of the Rivers Tigris and Euphrates, arriving on 7th December to take part in an offensive operation with the purpose of dislodging the enemy from the right (or western) bank position of the Tigris and severing the enemy's communication channels.

From Kurna the battery's route was via Sakricha, Ezra's Tomb, Abu Rubah, Qulat Salah and Abu Sidrah to Amara, reached on 14th December. By 18th December General Maude's Tigris Corps had extended their grip on the Turkish defences and had cut in opposite Kut between the outer Turkish defences and the west of the Hai, while simultaneously bombarding Sannaiyat and by Christmas Eve 157 Heavy Battery had returned to Sheikh Saad.

General Maude now directed his force in a steady advance up the Tigris, winning the Battles of Mohammed Abdul Hassan, Hai Salient, and Dahra B in January 1917, recapturing Kut in February 1917, and taking Baghdad on 11th March 1917.

After Baghdad fell there were still 10,000 Ottoman troops north of the city, led by Khalil Pasha, who could represent a threat to Anglo-Indian forces. Furthermore, another 15,000 Ottomans under Ali Ihsan Bey were being driven out of Persia by the Russians, and were attempting to join Khalil's forces. General Maude decided that, in order to avert these threats, he had to take control of the Samarrah railroad north of Baghdad.

Operations began on March 13th with 45,000 British troops. On March 19th they conquered Fallujah, a crucial step toward the offensive's goal. The British continued their attacks until April 23rd when the town of Samarrah and its railroad fell into their hands.

The summer of 1917 in Mesopotamia was extraordinarily hot. In Baghdad the British Army set up a special hospital in July 1917 on the Tigris at the Hinaidie Bend primarily to deal with the large numbers of heat stroke cases. Some of these were fatal in older soldiers whose temperatures rose to 110 degrees, resulting in heart failure. Thomas died of heat stroke in Baghdad on 21st August 1917, aged 33. He was one of 613 fatalities due to heat stroke in Mesopotamia in the summer of 1917.

He was buried in Baghdad (North Gate) War Cemetery, Iraq, Grave VI. D. 10.

Private 20467 Thomas Gray

 

D Coy. 6th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 17th July 1916,  Aged 38.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial, Somme, pier & face 2 c & 3 a.

 

Thomas Gray was born in Loughborough in 1878, the son of James Gray and Elizabeth Gray (née Hunt) who were married in Loughborough in 1869. Thomas never knew his mother as she died about the same time as Thomas was born. In 1881 Thomas's widowed father, a dyer's labourer, was living with his own parents Patrick and Annie Gray at 14 Bridge Street, Loughborough. Thomas's older siblings Charles, James, and Bridget were also at 14 Bridge Street with their father and grandparents while Thomas, aged two, was two doors away at 18 Bridge Street being looked after by James Pratt, an elderly shoemaker, and his wife Mary. After both Thomas's grandparents died in 1887 the Gray family moved to 16 Shakespeare Street and the household included Thomas, his brother James and sister Bridget, his father, Thomas's uncle Thomas Gray and his aunt Maggie Gray. Thomas's father James died in 1892. Thomas next appears in 1911 as an unemployed labourer lodging in premises run by John Hueck at 5 Green Close Lane.

Thomas enlisted at Leicester in August 1914 and joined D Company of the 6th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment, part of Kitchener's First New Army, as Private 20467. Thomas was then sent to Bordon, near Aldershot, Hampshire where the emphasis was on individual training, squadron and platoon drill. In March 1915 the battalion went into billets in Liphook.

In April 1915 the 6th Battalion became part of the 37th Division of the Army and concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the 37th Division was inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July 1915 most of the Division began to cross the English Channel but Thomas remained in England until December 29th 1915 when he was sent to France. At this point Thomas's battalion was near the front line south-west of Arras. In the months that followed the 6th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 8th Leicesters who relieved them. The battalion was engaged in localised operations seeking a tactical advantage and remained in the area around Bienvillers and Bailleulmont until July 1916.

On 1st July 1916 the 6th Battalion moved from Saulty to Humbercamps, where it was held in reserve for the Somme Offensive which had just begun. On 6th July the battalion marched to Talmas to join the Army's 21st Division. From 7th to 10th July the battalion was in Hengest-sur-Somme, and from there on 10th marched to Ailly, entrained for Méricourt, took buses to Méaulte, and then proceeded to Fricourt. Between 14th and 17th July the battalion took part in an attack on and successfully captured Bazentin-le-Petit Wood and village. Thomas, aged 38, was killed in action in this battle.

Thomas is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 2C and 3A.

Thomas's brother James lived at 18 Station Road, Loughborough, and his sister Bridget (Mrs.Hunt) at 8 Lower Cambridge Street.

Able Seaman Bristol Z/4431 Albert Charles Green

 

Howe Bn, R.N. Div, Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve.

Killed in Action 17th February 1917, Aged 19.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial,  pier & face 1 a.

 

 

Albert Charles Green, known to his family as 'Chas', was born in Loughborough on 29th May 1897, the son of Richard Green and his wife Topsy (née Redding). Both parents originally came from Buckinghamshire and Chas's father was a navvy's excavator. Chas had two brothers Richard and Frederick and three sisters Alice, Susan and Gladys. In 1901 the Green family lived at 2 Court C, Baxter Gate, Loughborough, but by 1911 had moved to 1 Canal Bank, Bridge Street. In 1911 Chas's mother was now working as a charwoman and his father, although still working as a labourer, was in poor health. Chas himself was working as an assistant to a brushmaker. Chas's father died, aged 49, in 1913 and after this the family moved to 21 Edward Street. Chas now gained employment as a woodworking machine hand for the Brush Electrical Engineering Company.

Chas joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) as Ordinary Seaman Z/4431 on 11th October 1915. He was attached to the 6th Battalion and sent to the training depot HMS Victory VI at Crystal Palace. He gave his religion as Church of England and stated that he was unable to swim. On 9th December 1915 he was put on the list of Royal Naval Division Reserves at HMS Victory IX and posted to the 7th Reserve Battalion at Blandford, Dorset, being rated as an Able Seaman. He spent eight days in Portland Hospital in February 1916 and on 10th May 1916 was transferred from 7th Reserve Battalion to the 2nd Anson Battalion at Blandford where he remained for almost one month before being transferred to the 2nd Reserve Battalion. On 9th September 1916 he was transferred again, this time to A Reserve Battalion. On 15th December 1916 Chas was lent to the Woolwich Recruiting Office for a trade test and not long afterwards, on 2nd January 1917 he was drafted to the Howe Battalion of the British Expeditionary Force.

Howe Battalion was one of eight battalions of the 63rd (Royal Naval) Division which, from July 1916, came under the aegis of the War Office rather than the Admiralty. Chas embarked at Folkestone for Calais on 3rd January 1917. On disembarking he was sent to the base depot at Calais and on 24th January he joined Howe Battalion which was taking part in the winter operations around the River Ancre in Picardy. The battalion was relieved from the trenches on 25th, marching to Engelbelmer on the following day. The battalion was back in the trenches on 1st February amid heavy snow and remained there until 8th, on the receiving end of enemy shelling and night firing. They nevertheless managed to capture 200 enemy prisoners. On being relieved the battalion moved to Engelbelmer and dugouts at Thiepval. On 10th February they moved to Forceville where three days training took place. On 14th the battalion proceeded to the area of Beaucourt in order to relieve the 7th Royal Fusiliers as a support battalion. On 16th February they moved up to the front line and occupied a position over 400 yards at Puisieux.

On 17th February an attack on the enemy began, with a preliminary barrage before Howe Battalion advanced. The attack was successful and the battalion captured 40 prisoners. The enemy nevertheless kept up hostile fire and there were about 180 casualties. Chas was killed in action, aged 19. He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 1A. He is also commemorated on the memorial at Emmanuel Church, on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building, both in Loughborough, and on the Brush Company Memorial (in the Carillon Museum) as well as on the Carillon.

 

      Albert's Medals

Private 255519 Alfred William Green

 

Leicestershire Yeomanry.

Died of Wounds 22nd June 1917, Aged 22.

Buried Villers-Faucon Communal Cemetery C 36.

(his brother Richard Green also fell see below) 

 

Alfred William Green was born on 25th November 1894 in Lichfield, Staffordshire, and baptised on 2nd January 1895 at Christ Church, Lichfield. He was the son of George Green and Annie Beatrice Green (née Gough) who were married at St. Paul's Church, Burton on Trent on 5th May 1884. George Green, formerly a Quartermaster in the Queen's Own Staffs Yeomanry, was a butcher and meat contractor with a shop in Lichfield and in the 1890s the Green family lived at Boston House, Walshall Road, Leomansley, Lichfield. Alfred had two brothers George and Richard and two sisters Nellie and Queenie. Two other siblings had died young.

After Alfred's father died, aged 40, in February 1900 Alfred's mother moved to 6 Bird Street, Lichfield, and carried on running her husband's butchers shop. By 1911, however, she had moved to 49 Toothill Road, Loughborough, and was running a boarding house. In 1911 Alfred, aged 16. Was a packer in the hosiery trade in Loughborough. Alfred's mother later moved to 33 Clarence Street, Loughborough.

Alfred joined the 1/1 Leicestershire Yeomanry initially as Private 2587, but later renumbered as Private 255519. The Leicestershire Yeomanry had been formed on the creation of the Territorial Force in April 1908 and placed under orders of the North Midland Mounted Brigade. It was headquartered in Leicester and C Squadron was based in Loughborough.

Alfred was sent to France on 27th May 1915. He was in a draft of 200 ordinary Ranks who joined the Yeomanry in billets at Wittes, Ypres, on 31st May. Throughout June and July 1915 the Yeomanry remained in Wittes, providing working parties for digging trenches at Neuve Eglise, Sailly-sur-la-Lys and Elverdinghe. On 6th August they moved to new billets in villages near Hervarre while they dug trenches at Armentières, and on 29th September moved on again to Le Nieppe. In mid-October they moved to Noordpeene and then Fruges. Early November was spent digging trenches at Lynde, Ouderdom, Zillebeeke lake and north of Bielen. From there they moved to Wicquinghem on November 16th and dug trenches at Ebblinghem and Lynde. The regiment remained at Wicquinghem until 14th March 1916.

From then until 6th May 1916 the Leicestershire Yeomanry was in billets at Herly and Rollez before moving to Bourthes. From 15th to 20th May they were in training at Neuilly l'Hôpital, returning afterwards to Bourthes until 24th June. Between 24th June and 4th July the regiment transferred via Crécy en Ponthieu, Berteaucourt-les-Dames and Corbie to Fontaine-sur-Somme, where on 5th July they were sent to clear the battlefield. From 8th July to 1st August and back at Corbie they provided working parties to mend the roads at Henencourt and to clear the battlefield at Bécourt. The first five days of August were spent moving back to Bourthes where they remained until 11th September, providing working parties and sniping parties. From 11th September the regiment was continually on the march, which ended when squadrons moved into billets at Lebiez, Torcy and Rimboval in the Pas de Calais on 24th September. Here a group of 8 Officers and 256 Ordinary Ranks proceeded to form part of the 7th Cavalry Pioneer Battalion.

They did not move again until 1st February 1917 when they went into new billets at Merlimont Plage, on the Channel coast south-west of Etaples, where they spent until the beginning of April training men and horses and trialling the comparative effects of rifle and Hotchkiss machine gun fire. Between 4th and 19th April they marched to Arras and then on to Estruval (Somme). Between 12th and 24th May they proceeded to the area east of Epehy. At the beginning of June, at Buire, they provided trench parties in the outpost and support lines of the front.

On 22nd June 1917 the Germans attempted a raid. Three soldiers of the Yeomanry were brought in wounded and all died. Alfred was one of them. He was 22 when he died. Alfred was buried in Villers-Faucon Communal Cemetery, north-east of Peronne, Grave C 36. He is commemorated on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building, Loughborough, and on the Carillon.

Alfred's brother Richard who served with the Grenadier Guards, died of wounds received in action in 1914.

Sapper WR/282461 D. Green

 

23rd Light Railway, Royal Engineers.

Died 5th December 1918.

Buried St Pol British Cemetery, St Pol Sur Ternoise, D 13.

 

D was the husband of Mrs M. Green of The Bulls Head Hotel, Loughborough.

Lance Corporal 8499 John Henry Green

 

2nd Bn. Hampshire Regiment.

Died of Wounds Gallipoli 8th August 1915, Aged 21.

Buried Lancashire Landing Cemetery, Turkey, G 27.

 

John Henry Green was born in 1894 in Derby, the son of William Henry Edward Green, a cooper working with ale barrels, and his wife Minnie Marianne (née Taylor) who were married at St. James the Greater Church in Derby in 1882. William and Minnie had a large family of at least ten children, although not all seem to have survived to adulthood. The family initially lived at 4 Charlotte Street, Derby, but by 1901 had moved to 53 St. Helen's Street. It is clear that family life was not easy for the parents as one of their daughters, Alma, was in Bristol Industrial School for Girls in 1901. Life became even more difficult when the children's father William Green died in 1907 and their mother Minnie died five years later in 1912. It is possible that young John was also sent away from home or simply left Derby as he attested for the military in Bristol before 1911. In 1911 he is listed, aged 17, as a Private with the 1st Battalion of the Hampshire Regiment, occupation musician, in Badajos Barracks, Wellington Lines, Aldershot, Surrey.

In August 1914 the 1st Battalion was in Colchester as part of the 11th Brigade of the 4th Division. Shortly after moving to Harrow they went to France, landing at Le Havre on 23rd August 1914. From August to November 1914 they were in action at the Battles of Le Cateau, the Marne, the Aisne, Messines and Armentieres.

At some point between November 1914 and March 1915 John Green was promoted to Lance-Corporal in the 2nd Battalion of the Hampshires. The 2nd Battalion was in Warwick and training for France when orders arrived to depart for Gallipoli. They embarked from Avonmouth on the 20th and 21st March 1915 sailing via Malta, Alexandria, Egypt, and Lemnos, Greece, then on to Mudros , Turkey. The battalion joined the Gallipoli landings on the morning of 25th April on 'V' Beach and suffered many casualties while wading ashore in deep water.

The battalion continued to have a difficult time at Gallipoli, and lost a lot of men on one particular day - 6 Aug 1915. On that day they attacked two trenches at 1550 hrs in four waves, and all went well until they reached a low crest. They were then raked by Turkish machine gun fire, and only a few men reached the trenches. The casualties for that one attack were 18 officers and 224 other ranks killed or missing, with two officers and 210 other ranks wounded. Many of the wounded had to stay out in the open until it got dark, whereupon they crawled back to their own lines or were brought back. John Green was one of those wounded and he died two days later.

John was the brother of Mrs Gertrude M. Chell of 40 Station Street, Loughborough.
 
John's Memorial Plaque

Private 12758 Richard Green

 

2nd Bn, Grenadier Guards.

Died of Wounds 14th September 1914, Aged 26.

Commemorated La Ferte - Sous  - Jouarre Memorial, Seine Et Marne. 

(his brother Alfred Green also fell see above)

Richard Green was born in Lichfield in 1888 and baptised on 21st April 1888 at Christ Church, Lichfield. He was the son of George Green and Annie Beatrice Green (née Gough) who were married at St. Paul's Church, Burton on Trent on 5th May 1884. George Green, formerly a Quartermaster in the Queen's Own Staffs Yeomanry, was a butcher and meat contractor with a shop in Lichfield and in the 1890s the Green family lived at Boston House, Walshall Road, Leomansley, Lichfield. Richard had two brothers George and Alfred and two sisters Nellie and Queenie. Two other siblings had died young.

After Richard's father died, aged 40, in February 1900 Richard's mother moved to 6 Bird Street, Lichfield, and carried on running her husband's butchers shop. By 1911, however, she had moved to 49 Toothill Road, Loughborough, and was running a boarding house. She subsequently moved to 33 Clarence Street, Loughborough.

In 1911 Richard, aged 23, was a van driver. He was later employed at the Working Men's Industrial Trading Society in Loughborough. On 26th November 1912 Richard married Florence Annie Allen at St. Peter's Church, Loughborough, and the couple set up home at 22 Paget Street. Their son George was born early in 1913 and their son George in early 1915.

When war broke out Richard, a Reservist with the Grenadier Guards, left Loughborough to re-join his regiment at Wellington Barracks on August 4th 1914. A fortnight later, as Private 20467, he left Southampton for the front and was in active service at the Battle of Mons, the First Battle of the Marne, and the First Battle of the Aisne where he was severely wounded. Suffering from gunshot wounds he was being sent to England on the hospital ship Carisbrooke Castle when he died at sea on 14th September 1914. He was buried at sea.

Richard is remembered on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building in Loughborough as well as on the Carillon.

His brother Alfred who was with the Leicestershire Yeomanry was killed in 1917.

Richard's widow Florence was remarried in 1920 in Loughborough to George Pepper.

Private 12181 Charles Matthew Grimbley

 

8th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 25th September 1916, Aged 26.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial,  pier & face 2c & 3a.

 

 

Charles Matthew Grimbley was born in Loughborough in late 1889 or early 1890. He was the son of Charles Grimbley, a boiler maker, and his wife Hannah (formerly Percival, née Smith) who were married in Loughborough in 1883. Charles's mother had been previously married in 1875 to Andrew Percival who had died, aged 26, in 1882. Her three children by Andrew Percival -Clara, Emma and Thomas-were in the Grimbley household at 15 Cross Street, Loughborough, in 1891. Hannah had five more children with Charles Grimbley but only two lived to adulthood, Charles Matthew and his sister Beatrice. In 1901 the Grimbley/Percival household was still in Cross Street, but at house no. 3. Charles Matthew's mother died in 1906 and by 1911 Charles Matthew was a puncher and shearer for a boilermaker. His father died in 1913 having moved from Cross Street to 51 Morley Street.

Charles enlisted in early September 1914 and joined the 8th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 12181. From the Depot he was sent firstly to Aldershot for training. He moved to Shorncliffe in Kent at the end of February 1915. In April 1915 Charles's battalion became part of the newly established 37th Division of Kitchener's 2nd New Army and the Division began to concentrate on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the units were inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July the Division began to cross the English Channel and Charles travelled to France on 29th July 1915. Initially the 37th Division concentrated near Tilques.

The 8th Battalion then moved via Watten, Houlie, St. Omer, Eecke and Dranoutre to Wulverghem and Berles-au-Bois, a short distance from the front line. In the months that followed the 8th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 6th Leicesters who relieved them. They were Involved in operations in Bailleul, Le Bizet, Armentières, Mondicourt, Beauval and Berles-au-Bois.

In April 1916 Charles had moved with the 8th Leicesters to the Doullens area for six weeks cleaning up, resting and training. In mid-May they returned once more to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont sector, but nearer Gommecourt. In June there was a series of nightly excursions into No-Man's Land with patrols attempting to gather information on the enemy's dispositions. On other occasions there were working parties out repairing the British barbed wire entanglements. The situation became increasingly hazardous as the month wore on when the Germans began to use a new and more accurate type of trench mortar.

The 8th Battalion did not participate in the first days of the Somme Offensive but was held in reserve. On 6th July Charles's battalion left billets at Humbercamps and marched to Talmas, continuing on the following day to billets in Soues. On 10th July the battalion marched to Ailly-sur-Somme, entrained for Méricourt and travelled from there by lorry to bivouacs in Méaulte. Between 10th and 13th July the battalion was in the trenches near Fricourt and subjected to fairly continuous enemy fire.

On the 14th July the battalion was in action at the Battle of Bazentin Ridge. After the battle the battalion withdrew to Ribemont and then to Méricourt, and having entrained for Saleux, marched to Soues. From Soues the battalion moved to Longeau, Gouy-en-Ternois, Lattre St. Quentin and then to Arras where they went into the trenches on 29th July. Casualty figures for the battalion in July had been high: 17 officers and 415 other ranks had been killed, wounded or were missing.

The battalion went into Divisional Reserve at Agnez-les-Ouisans on 8th August but went back into the trenches at Arras on 18th August where they were on the receiving end of trench mortar bombs and heavy shells until 2nd September. They were relieved on 2nd September and marched to Duisans and on the following day proceeded to Lignereuil. On 13th September they marched to Frevent and entrained for Dernancourt. On 15th they reached a point between Fricourt and Méaulte before proceeding to Trônes Wood on 16th.

From 17th-23rd September the battalion was in reserve and supporting the troops in the front line by providing carrying parties. In the evening of 24th September the battalion marched up to take their position ready for an attack but before they reached this point the men were heavily shelled by the enemy. Just after midday on 25th September the 8th Leicesters launched a successful attack in waves on the right of Flers and then pressed on to Gueudecourt, Considerable losses, however, were suffered in this action.

Charles was killed in action on 25th September, aged 26. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 2C and 3A, and on the memorial at All Saints Church, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon. His effects were divided equally between his sister Beatrice Grimbley and his half-sister Clara Housley (née Percival).

Private 1754 Henry Archer Grudgings

 

Leicestershire Yeomanry.

Killed in Action 13th May 1915, Aged 23.

Buried Bedford House Cemetery, Enclosure no, 4 V. F. 10.

 

Henry Archer Grudgings was one of seven children born to Daniel Grudgings (1856- 1904) and his wife Emma (née Start), five of whom survived into adulthood. In 1911 Henry had an older brother Daniel, and three sisters Bertha, Ethel and Florence. Their parents Daniel and Emma were married in Loughborough in 1874 and eventually lived at 14 Beacon Road, Loughborough. Daniel Grudgings Senior died in 1904.

Henry was the first cousin of William 'Bill' Grudgings who kept the war diary which is on Twitter. Their respective fathers Daniel and William, both sons of Daniel Grudgings (1829-1876) and his wife Ann (née Hobill), were in business together and operated the hosiery needle manufacturing company 'Daniel Grudgings and Bros.' of Albert Street, Loughborough. There was a second needle manufacturing company owned by a related branch of the Grudgings family 'J. T. and C. Grudgings', in School Street.

Henry was educated at Loughborough Grammar School and started work as an electrical engineer with a lifting gear manufacturer (probably Herbert Morris Ltd.). He enlisted at the end of January 1911, aged 19. In WW1 it is likely that he served with the 1/1st Leicestershire Yeomanry which landed in France on 3rd November 1914 and shortly after became part of 7th Cavalry Brigade of 3rd Cavalry Division. (The 2/1st Leicestershire Yeomanry was not sent overseas until October 1915 and the 3/1st was not formed until 1915 and was kept at Aldershot.)

After participating in the Battle of Nonne Bosschen on 11th November 1914 (a phase of the 1st Battle of Ypres) the Yeomanry were employed in winter operations until called to the front line on the second day of the Battle of Frezenburg Ridge. 281 men of the Leicestershire Yeomanry went into battle, 94 lost their lives, including Henry Grudgings, 93 were wounded and only 94 came through unscathed.

[Note: Henry is erroneously recorded on some official documents as 'Henry Arthur Grudgings'.]

Private 82181 Thomas Cyril Guest

 

20th Bn. Durham Light Infantry.

Killed in Action 12th September 1918, Aged 19.

Buried Grootebeek British Cemetery, G. 8.

 

Thomas was the son of David H. & Florence Guest of 73 Matlock Road, Birkdale. Born Loughborough.

Rifleman 51987 John Frederick Gutheridge

 

D Coy. 4th Bn. 3rd. N.Z. Rifle Brigade.

Killed in Action 7th January 1918, Aged 24.

Buried Oxford Road Cemetery, III. G. 10.

 

John was the son of John Thomas & Sarah Gutheridge of 72 Gladstone Street, Loughborough.
In a letter to the parents, the Chaplain says  " Your son was starting out with a working party at 3 am, when the platoon was filing round a shell hole a Boche shell burst killing your son and a corporal, and wounding others. Some of the pieces of shell struck him on the head and the body, and death was instantaneous. The funeral was attended by his C O and the remainder of the platoon," The Captain of the Company also wrote conveying his sympathy, and adding " Your son died doing his duty for his Empire and loved ones. He was respected by all his mates". Rifleman Gutteridge who served his apprenticeship as a joiner with Messrs, Messengers Ltd, went out to New Zealand at the age of 21, just before war broke out. He was working on war work up to the spring of 1917, when he joined the New Zealand Rifle Brigade, and he had been in France since October.

Private 25439 Henry (Harry) Hack

 

4th Bn, Worcestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 21st April 1916, Aged 28.

Buried Mesnil Ridge Cemetery, Somme, F. 4.

 

Henry Hack, known as 'Harry', was born on 28th September 1887 in Loughborough, the youngest son of William Hack and his wife Ann (née Clark). Harry had three older brothers William, Charles and John and three older sisters Ada, Ellen and Mary Ann. Harry's parents were married in Loughborough in 1865. In 1865 his father was a shoemaker in Leicester, but he eventually joined the Hack family's butchery business at 3 The Rushes, Loughborough and became a tripe dresser.

Harry grew up at 3 The Rushes in a household which included not only his parents and siblings but also his two maiden aunts Emma and Mary Ann Hack. Harry also joined the family business and became a tripe dresser with his father and older brother Charles. His father died in 1900 and his mother in 1904 and two years later in 1906 Harry married Sarah Elizabeth Ferrin in Loughborough. Harry and Sarah set up home just off The Rushes at 23 Shakespeare Street and by 1908 had two sons Sidney and William. Sarah Hack also had another son Frank Hack in 1917 but Frank's father was not Harry Hack.

Harry enlisted in November 1915 and joined the Worcestershire Regiment as Private 25439. He was sent to join the 4th Battalion in the Dardanelles on 6th December 1915. On the nights of 7th and 8th January 1916, the battalion was evacuated from Gallipoli and sent to Egypt where orders were received on 25th February for a move from Suez to France. Harry sailed from Alexandria on 15th March and arrived at Marseilles on 20th March.

From Marseilles the battalion travelled by train to the area east of Pont Remy in the Somme area of Picardy, arriving there on 23rd March. Various route marches took place until the beginning of April, followed by training at Louvencourt until 12th April when the battalion was ordered to proceed to Mailly-Maillet for trench work. On 18th April orders were received for the battalion to relieve the Royal Munster Fusiliers and part of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in the firing line. On 21st April, while the men were repairing the trenches, a dugout was hit by a mortar shell, killing four men instantaneously including Harry Hack.

In a letter to a relative the captain of the company said that it was a most unfortunate occurrence, but such was the fortune of war. The letter concluded with a note that the battalion regretted the loss of such good soldiers greatly.

Harry Hack was buried at Mesnil Ridge Cemetery, Somme, Grave F. 4.

 

Henry Hack Medals & Death Plaque

 

Private 2669 Frederick Arthur William Hague

 

7th Bn, Australian Infantry, A.I.F.

Died of Wounds 19th August 1916, Aged 25.

Buried Becourt Military Cemetery, Somme, I. T. 6.

(his brother Leonard Hague also fell see below) 

 

Frederick Arthur William Hague was born in Loughborough in 1890. He was the eldest son of William Goodacre Hague and his wife Emma (née Gibson) who were married in Loughborough in 1879. William, a hosiery machine fitter, and Emma had nine children, eight of whom survived to adulthood. Frederick had five sisters Edith, Carrie, Gertrude, Florence and Hilda and two brothers Leonard and Everard. In 1891 and 1901 the family lived at 3 Cobden Street, Loughborough, but by 1911 had moved to 1 Forest Road. Frederick attended Holy Trinity Church in Loughborough.

Frederick, who in 1911 was a clerk in the timber trade in the offices of Messrs, J. Griggs and Co., in Loughborough went to Australia in 1913 to take up farming. By 1915 he was living at 145 Blythe Street, Brunswick, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia and was employed as a farm labourer. He also had connections with Vectis East, near Horsham, Victoria.

Frederick enlisted in Melbourne on 4th August 1915. As Private 2669 he embarked in Melbourne, Australia on H.M.A.T. Ulysses on the 27th October 1915 with the 6th Reinforcements, 24th Battalion, of the 6th Australian Infantry Brigade (Australian Imperial Force). In Egypt he was initially sent to the 6th Training Battalion at Zeitoun but was taken on the strength of D Company of the 7th Battalion of the Australian Infantry at Serapeum, Egypt, on the 24th February 1916. Frederick embarked in Alexandria, Egypt, to join the British Expeditionary Force on the 26th March 1916, disembarking in Marseilles on 31st March. Upon arrival, his battalion was sent to Morbecque, west of Armentières and it was in this area that the men entered the front line trenches for the first time on 3rd May. The battalion's first major action in France was at Pozières in the Somme valley where it fought between 23rd-27th July and 15th-21st August 1916.

Frederick was wounded in action on 17th August 1916. He was admitted to the 1st Australian Field Ambulance suffering from a gunshot wound to the neck on 19th August 1916. He died from his wound on the same day, aged 25, and was buried in Becourt Military Cemetery, Becordel-Becourt, near Albert, by the Officer Commanding the 1st Australian Field Ambulance on the 19th August 1916. A package of personal effects was forwarded to his father and included a religious book, 8 coins, 2 photos, a stud, 2 pieces of ribbon and a linen bag.

Frederick is remembered on the Memorial from Holy Trinity Church, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon. His brother Leonard who was with the 8th Leicesters was killed in 1917. His brother Everard who served with the London Territorial Engineers survived the war.

Sergeant 241432 George Hague

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 8th October 1918.

Commemorated Vis-En Artios Memorial, panel 5.                        

 

George is believed to have been a regular in the army. He married Charlotte Solomon 1st June 1903 at that time he was a labourer and living at 4 Irlam Street South Wigston, although born in Loughborough. They went on to have 11 children so Charlotte was widowed and left to bring all these children up on her own. They were then living in Morley Street Loughborough. His father also George Hague was a fitter at the Iron Foundry. He was born in Belper Derbys but lived in Mill Street, Loughborough. His father was William Hague born Dublin 1822  

Private 24943 Leonard Gibson Hague

 

8th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 21st october 1917,  Aged 24.

Commemorated Tyne Cot  Memorial, Zonnebeke, panel 50 - 51.

 

(his brother Frederick Hague also fell see above)

STRUCK BY A SHELL

News was received by Mr. and Mrs. William Hague 1 Forest road, Loughborough, of the death in action of their second son, Signaler Leonard Hague, Leicestershire Regiment, which took place on October 21st. He was unmarried and prior to enlisting was employed in the warehouse of the Nottingham Manufacturing Co. The letter conveying the sad news was sent by an officer, who says that Signaler Hague was struck by a shell. He was a good soldier and well liked by the company for his cheerful disposition. Mr. and Mrs. Hague have a younger son Everard serving abroad with the London Territorial Engineers, and their eldest son, Fred was killed in action last year.

Private 12649 Edward Sidney Herbert Haigh

 

8th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 15th July 1916,  Aged 29.

Buried Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz, IV. C. 10.

 

(2 brothers also fell Joseph &  Walter Haigh see below)

 

 

Edward Sidney Herbert Haigh was born in Worsborough near Barnsley, Yorkshire, in 1887, the son of Walter Haigh and his wife Sarah Ann (née Wiggins). He was known to his family and friends as 'Ted' and always spelled his second forename as 'Sidney' even though his birth was registered as 'Edward Sydney H. Haigh'. His parents were married on 12th May 1883 at St. George's Church, Barnsley. Both Ted's parents were schoolteachers and his father was headmaster at Worsborough Common School. The Haigh family lived in the School House at 35 Highstone Road, Worsborough Common. Ted had two brothers Joseph and Walter Bertram and a sister Ida.

After Ted's mother died in 1904 all the family except Joseph stayed on for a while at Worsborough - in 1911 both Walter Bertram and Ted were assistant teachers at their father's school while Joseph was working as an elementary school teacher in Hitchin, Hertfordshire. Sometime between 1911 and 1914, however, Ted secured a teaching position at Church Gate Boys' School in Loughborough and he, his brother Walter Bertram and their father relocated to 131 Derby Road, Loughborough. Ida, meanwhile, moved to 209 Park Road, Barnsley.

Ted enlisted in Loughborough on 1st September 1914 and on enlistment declared that he had previously served with the York Dragoons (a Yeomanry regiment). He joined the 8th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 12649 and was sent to Aldershot. On 1st February1915 he was promoted to Lance Corporal (paid). He moved to Shorncliffe Camp near Cheriton in Kent at the end of February 1915. On 30th April Ted was sent to hospital in Deal for a month suffering from an inguinal hernia. On 17th May 1915 Ted requested to return to the rank of Private. His battalion had now become part of the newly established 37th Division of Kitchener's 2nd New Army and the Division began to concentrate on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the units were inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July the Division began to cross the English Channel and Ted travelled to France on 29th July 1915. Initially the 37th Division concentrated near Tilques.

The 8th Battalion then moved via Watten, Houlie, St. Omer, Eecke and Dranoutre to Wulverghem and Berles-au-Bois, a short distance from the front line. In the months that followed the 8th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 6th Leicesters who relieved them. They were Involved in operations in Bailleul, Le Bizet, Armentières, Mondicourt, Beauval and Berles-au-Bois. In April 1916 the battalion moved to the Doullens area for six weeks for cleaning up, resting and training. In mid-May they returned once more to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont sector, but nearer Gommecourt. In June there was a series of nightly excursions into No-Man's Land with patrols attempting to gather information on the enemy's dispositions. On other occasions there were working parties out repairing the British barbed wire entanglements. The situation became increasingly hazardous as the month wore on when the Germans began to use a new and more accurate type of trench mortar.

The 8th Battalion did not participate in the first days of the Somme Offensive but was held in reserve. On 6th July they left billets at Humbercamps and marched to Talmas, continuing on the following day to billets in Soues. On 10th July the battalion marched to Ailly-sur-Somme, entrained for Méricourt and travelled from there by lorry to bivouacs in Méaulte. Between 10th and 13th July the battalion was in the trenches near Fricourt and subjected to fairly continuous enemy fire. On 14th and 15th July the battalion advanced on Bazentin Le Petit Wood. During this operation Ted, aged 29, was killed in action on 15th July 1916. Ted is buried at Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz, Grave IV.C.10. He is commemorated on the memorial at the former St. Peter's Church, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon. He was mourned by his family and his fiancé Clara Edith Butler of 301 Humberstone Road, Leicester, whose family lived in Loughborough.

Ted's brother Walter Bertram was killed in action in September 1916 and his brother Joseph died of wounds in 1918. Their father died in 1917 in Loughborough.

Private 23696 Joseph R. Haigh

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 29th March 1918.

Buried St Sever Cemetery, Rouen, P. VII. L. 11A.

(2 brothers also fell Edward &  Walter Haigh see above & below)

 

Joseph parents lived at 131 Derby Road, Loughborough.

Lance Corporal 16059 Walter Bertram Haigh

 

9th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 25th September 1916,  Aged 31.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial,  pier & face 2c 3a.                                                                               

(2 brothers also fell Edward &  Joseph see above)

 

 

Walter Bertram Haigh was born in Worsborough near Barnsley, Yorkshire, in 1884, the son of Walter Haigh and his wife Sarah Ann (née Wiggins). He was baptised on 25th January 1885 at Worsbrough. He was known to his family and friends as 'Bert'. His parents were married on 12th May 1883 at St. George's Church, Barnsley. Both Bert's parents were schoolteachers and his father was headmaster at Worsborough Common School. The Haigh family lived in the School House at 35 Highstone Road, Worsborough Common. Bert had two brothers Joseph and Edward ('Ted') and a sister Ida.

After Bert's mother died in 1904 all the family except Joseph stayed on for a while at Worsborough - in 1911 both Bert and Ted were assistant teachers at their father's school while Joseph was working as an elementary school teacher in Hitchin, Hertfordshire. Sometime between 1911 and 1914, however, Ted secured a teaching position at Church Gate Boys' School in Loughborough and Bert relocated with his brother and their father to 131 Derby Road, Loughborough. Ida, meanwhile, moved to 209 Park Road, Barnsley.

Bert enlisted on 17th November 1914 at Loughborough, giving his occupation as 'musician'. He joined the 9th Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 16059. The 9th (Service) Battalion was raised at Leicester in September 1914 as part of Kitchener's Third New Army and joined 23rd Division as Divisional Troops. The units of the Division began to assemble at Bullswater and Frensham in Hampshire from September 1914 and the King, Queen and Princess Mary visited the fledgling Division on 29 September. In early December, as the weather worsened, the Division moved into Aldershot and then, at the end of February 1915, to Shorncliffe in Kent. In April 1915 Fergus' battalion became part of the newly established 37th Division of Kitchener's 2nd New Army and the Division began to concentrate on Salisbury Plain. Bert was encamped on Perham Down.

On 29th July 1915, Bert was sent to France, travelling from Folkestone to Boulogne on the SS St. Seiriol. Initially the 37th Division concentrated near Tilques. The 9th Battalion then moved via Watten, Houlie, St. Omer, Eecke and Dranoutre to Wulverghem and Bienvillers-au-Bois, a short distance from the front line. On 26th September 1915 Bert was appointed to the rank of Lance Corporal (unpaid).

In the months that followed the 9th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 7th Leicesters who relieved them. They were Involved in operations in Bailleul, Le Bizet, Armentières, Mondicourt, Beauval and Berles-au-Bois. In April 1916 the 9th Leicesters moved to the Doullens area for six weeks for cleaning up, resting and training. In mid-May they returned once more to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont sector. In June there was a series of nightly excursions into No-Man's Land with patrols attempting to gather information on the enemy's dispositions. On other occasions there were working parties out repairing the British barbed wire entanglements. The situation became increasingly hazardous as the month wore on when the Germans began to use a new and more accurate type of trench mortar.

On 1st July 1916 the 9th Leicesters moved into position at Souastre in readiness to reinforce the troops attacking at Gommecourt. No orders came, however, and the men marched back to Humbercamps. Training continued on the 4th and 5th July. On 6th and 7th July they marched via Talmas to Crouy and on 8th and 9th July they rested and were addressed by the Divisional Commander on the forthcoming battle. On 10th July they moved to Ailly-sur-Somme and then entrained for Méricourt before going by bus to bivouacs in Méaulte north-east of Amiens. They then took over as Quadrangle Trench and Quadrangle support. On 11th there was heavy shelling but no infantry attack. On 12th July the 9th battalion was relieved and moved back to Fricourt.

On 14th July the battalion moved up to the south edge of Mametz Wood just as an intense bombardment of the German positions began, and on to Bazentin-Le-Petit Wood. Finally relieved on 16th July the battalion, which had suffered heavy casualties, marched to Fricourt and on to Ribemont on the following day. On 18th July they entrained at Méricourt for Saleux. After nine days of marching and some motor lorry transit the battalion arrived at Arras on 27th July, where for all of August the battalion was in the trenches or resting in billets at Arras. After some days training and resting at the beginning of September the battalion marched to Frevent and entrained for 'Edgehill' station near Dernancourt. On 16th September the battalion moved to bivouac near Fricourt and after two days moved again to bivouac in front of Bernafay Wood.

On 24th September the battalion moved up to the assembly trenches in front of Gueudecourt in preparation for an attack on the following day. Bert was killed in action on 25th September 1916, aged 31. He is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 2C and 3A, and on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building in Loughborough as well as on the Carillon.

Bert's brother Ted was killed in action in July 1916 and his brother Joseph died of wounds in 1918. Their father died in 1917 in Loughborough.

Private 21735 Frederick Hall

 

2nd Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 29th May 1918,   Aged 30.

Buried Ramleh War Cemetery, Israel K. 46.          

 

 

His parents lived at 27 Moria Street, Loughborough & his Wife and Child lived at no 17 Cross Street, Loughborough.

Private 203349 Percy Hall

 

1st Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 22nd March 1918.

Commemorated Arras Memorial, bay 5.

 

Lance Corporal 16022 Wilfred Hall

 

9th Bn. South Staffordshire Regiment.

Killed in Action 5th July 1916, Aged 27.

Buried Bapaume Post Military Cemetery, I. C. II.

 

Wilfred Hall was born in Horncastle, Lincolnshire, in 1889, the son of Charles Hall and Mary Ann Hall (née Hutchinson) who were married in Horncastle in 1880. Wilfred's father was a shoemaker and in 1891 the Hall family was living at 25 Stourton Place, Horncastle. By 1901 they had moved to 6 Moores Yard and in 1911 were at 83 East Street. In 1911 Wilfred was employed as a labourer in the boiler industry. Wilfred had at least four brothers James, Alfred, Bertie and Allan, and at least three sisters Catherine, Maud and Lilian.

By 1913 Wilfred had moved to Loughborough. He was a member of the Dyers' Union and was well-known at the hosiery dye works of Messrs. Lacey, Godkin & Edwards in Loughborough. He married Celia Linton in Loughborough at the end of 1913 and the couple set up home at 31 Wood Gate, Loughborough. Their first child, a son called Charles, was born in 1914.

Wilfred appears to have enlisted at Loughborough Drill Hall by December 1914 and was posted to the 9th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers) of the South Staffordshire Regiment at Talavera Barracks, Aldershot. Between March and May the Pioneers were employed on the defences of London and working on trenches between Westerham and Knockholt. In addition there was hard training with inspections. On May 24th 1915 the battalion moved to Bordon, Hampshire, where the Pioneers went into camp at Oxney Farm. At the end of July all ranks were given seven days leave. On August 16th the 23rd Division of the Army, of which the Pioneers were part, formed up at Hankley Common to be inspected by the King and the following day orders were received to proceed to France. Wilfred sailed from Southampton to Le Havre on 24th August 1915.

From Le Havre the Division went by train via St. Omer to Tilques. The Division then moved to the Armentières area until April 1916 with the Pioneers occupying billets at Fort Rompu, Erquinghem-Lys. They were fully occupied building shelters, communication trenches and dug-outs and making hurdles. As winter approached the men's health began to suffer, with a number of cases of scabies reported. Between 26th January and 8th February 1916 the battalion was relieved after a lengthy five month spell in the front line. The battalion next served on the Souchez Front until June 1916 when it moved from Bouvigny to Ailly-sur-Somme, five miles west of Amiens in the Somme Department of Picardy. At some point Wilfred, who on enlistment was known as Private 16022, was promoted to Lance Corporal.

On 5th July 1916 Wilfred's battalion spent the whole day in the area of Becourt Wood, just behind the front line south-west of La Boiselle where they had been ordered to convey stores. At 5.00pm an enemy shell dropped on the transport lines killing Wilfred, six horses and four mules, and injuring a number of men.

Wilfred, who was aged 27 when he died, was buried in Bapaume Post Military Cemetery, Albert, Grave I.C.II. He is commemorated on the Memorial at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon.

Private 281123 James Hamilton

 

Queen' Own Oxfordshire Hussars.

Previously served as Trooper 2347 South Notts Hussars.

Died of Wounds 6th July 1917, Aged 20.

Buried Tincourt New British Cemetery Somme, I. A. 11.

 

James Hamilton was born in Nuneaton in 1897, the son of Peter Hamilton, a domestic groom and his wife Mary (née Lawson). James' father came from Glasgow and his mother from Ayrshire. James had one brother Andrew. The Hamilton family are slightly elusive, only appearing on one census record, that of 1901. In 1901 they were living at 3 Pool Bank Street, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, but it is known that they moved to 56 Derby Road, Loughborough, at some point between 1901 and 1914. Prior to enlisting James worked for Eastman's in Swann Street, Loughborough.

James enlisted in November 1915 at Nottingham and joined the South Notts Hussars (Nottinghamshire Yeomanry) as Trooper 2347. His service record has unfortunately not survived and there is some confusion in official records regarding his regiment and battalion. What seems to have happened, however, is that sometime after January/February 1917 James was transferred by the 2nd Reserve Regiment of Cavalry from the South Notts Hussars to the Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars (QOOH) and renumbered as Private 281123. (The 2nd Reserve Regiment of Cavalry trained both the South Notts Hussars and QOOH.)

The Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussars, in the 2nd Cavalry Division, had once been derided by the regulars as the 'agricultural cavalry' and its QOOH title used to create the nickname 'Queer Objects on Horseback'. By 1917, however, QOOH had been hardened by three years of gruelling active service and had been raised to a degree of military efficiency previously unheard of in a yeomanry regiment.

From 1st March to 7th April 1917 QOOH, part of the 4th Cavalry Brigade, was training at Vron (Somme), Picardy. On 7th April QOOH moved to Berlcourt and on 8th to Pas. On 9th April they were ordered to move south-east of Arras in readiness and between then and 11th April received several similar orders. On 11th April they relieved the 5th Cavalry Brigade before being told to move to Wailly and then Pas on 13th. At Pas and at Warlincourt from 20th April until 12th May the horses were rested. Between 12th and 16th May the Brigade moved to the new area of Hamelet. C Squadron went into trench support and QOOH relieved the infantry in the front line at Gillemont Farm. The farm was heavily shelled by the enemy on 19th May and attacked by the enemy on 20th, causing some casualties. The Regiment was relieved from Gillemont Farm on 31st May.

For the whole of June the Regiment was based at Brusle and provided working parties for the improvement of the line at Guillemont Farm despite continued enemy bombardment and attack. Raiding parties on the enemy were carried out at the beginning of July from Guillemont Farm.

On 5th July 1917 James was with C Squadron holding an advanced post, when the enemy started a heavy bombardment of trench mortars prior to an attack. It was during this that he was wounded. He was taken to the Regimental dressing station and afterwards to the casualty clearing station, where he died the next day on 6th July, aged 20.

An officer wrote to James' parents as follows: 'James was buried in the hospital cemetery [Tincourt New British Cemetery, Somme, Grave I.A.11] and the regimental carpenter fashioned the cross, which was painted and suitably inscribed. Allow me to offer you my deepest sympathy in your great loss. You know that he died nobly for his country and this may be some consolation in your grief'.

James is remembered on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building, Loughborough, and on the Carillon.

James' brother Andrew, a jockey, served in the 3rd Reserve Cavalry during the war but was discharged as unfit in 1918 after injuring his knee during drill.

Private 18312 Walter Hammond M.M.

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 14th July 1916, Aged 25.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial,  pier & face 2c & 3a.

 

 

Walter Hammond was born in 1890 in Loughborough, the son of James Hammond, a bricklayer, and his wife Annie Maria (née Mills) who were married in Loughborough in 1881. Walter had five brothers Thomas, George, Archibald, Albert and William and four sisters Kate, Florence, Frances and Dorothy. Three other siblings died in infancy. In 1891 the family lived at 36 Moira Street, Loughborough, in 1901 at 5A Fennel Street, and in 1911 at 86 Howard Street. In 1911 Walter was a printer's apprentice at the Echo Works.

In the early summer of 1914 Walter married Ethel Lucy Sutton in Loughborough and the couple lived firstly at No. 34 then at No. 9 Shakespeare Street, Loughborough. In 1915 their first child, named Walter after his father, was born.

The exact date of Walter's enlistment is unknown but he joined the 7th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 18312. On enlistment he would have been sent to Aldershot, Hampshire, for training. In April 1915 the 7th Battalion became part of the 37th Division of the Army and concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the 37th Division was inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill.

Walter went to France on 25th August 1915 where his battalion gathered with the 37th Division at Tilques, near St. Omer. In September the 7th Battalion was sent to the area of Berles-au-Bois, south-west of Arras. The battalion remained in this area around Bienvillers and Bailleulmont until April 1916 and was engaged in localised operations seeking a tactical advantage. When not in the trenches being subjected to enemy shelling the 7th Leicesters received intensive training in bombing, Lewis gunnery, visual signalling and a host of other activities. In April 1916 they were moved to the Doullens area and formed working parties to cut down trees and prepare brushwood for the front line as well as preparing the support trenches in the area. In May they worked on building a new railway line between Le Bret and Bienvillers-au-Bois. Towards the end of May the battalion returned to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont area.

At the beginning of July the 7th Battalion moved on to the Somme. They were at Fricourt on 13th July and at Mametz Wood and in the attack on Bazentin-le-Petit on 14th July. On 14th July Walter was reported missing. The news of the award of the Military Medal to Walter was conveyed in a letter from the Captain of his company who wrote in reply to enquiries regarding Private Hammond's whereabouts. The Captain wrote: 'We supplied the information to the base that your husband was wounded and I am awfully sorry to hear that you have heard nothing of him. He was wounded when we got well forward, by a bullet in the shoulder, and was dressed and sent back. He had to pass through a fair amount of shellfire on his way back, and may have been hit again, but I can get no news of this. He did wonderfully well with his gun, and has been awarded the Military Medal. Only four men in the battalion gained this glorious distinction, and he was one of them. All the men join in the wish that we shall still hear safe news of him, and we all send our many congratulations on him gaining this distinction. He was a splendid fellow. When I hear any news I will at once let you know'.

Walter's body was never found. He was 25 when he was killed and is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, pier and face 2C and 3A. He is also remembered on his mother's gravestone in Loughborough Cemetery.





Gravestone of Walter's mother

Private 44736 Albert Frederick Hancox

 

2nd Bn, Lincolnshire Regiment.

Formerly 37105 Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 13th August 1918, Aged 19.

Buried Acheux British Cemetery, Somme, I. E. 32.

 

Albert was the son of Walter & Annie Charlotte Hancox of 15 Gordon Street, Loughborough.
 

Private 40223 Arthur Handley

 

8th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 25th September 1916, Aged 19.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial,  pier & face 2c & 3a.

 

 

Arthur Handley was born in Loughborough in late 1896, the eldest child of Francis Charles William Handley, a bricklayer in the building trade, and his wife Sarah (née Thompson). Arthur's parents were married in Loughborough in 1896. Arthur had three brothers Harry, John and Harold and two sisters Nellie and Annie. He also had an older half-brother William Handley (formerly Thompson) who was born to his mother before Arthur's parents were married. In 1901 the family lived at 1 Cradock Street, Loughborough, but by 1911 had moved to 75 Gladstone Street. In 1911 Arthur, aged 14, was an office boy at John Jones and Sons' iron foundry in Meadow Lane, Loughborough, and sometime between 1911 and 1914 Arthur went to live with his maternal grandparents Joseph and Rachel Thompson at 149 Burder Street.

Arthur enlisted in early September 1914 and joined the 8th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 40223. From the Depot he was sent firstly to Aldershot for training. He moved to Shorncliffe in Kent at the end of February 1915. In April 1915 Arthur's battalion became part of the newly established 37th Division of Kitchener's 2nd New Army and the Division began to concentrate on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the units were inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July the Division began to cross the English Channel and Arthur travelled to France on 29th July 1915. Initially the 37th Division concentrated near Tilques.

The 8th Battalion then moved via Watten, Houlie, St. Omer, Eecke and Dranoutre to Wulverghem and Berles-au-Bois, a short distance from the front line. In the months that followed the 8th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 6th Leicesters who relieved them. They were Involved in operations in Bailleul, Le Bizet, Armentières, Mondicourt, Beauval and Berles-au-Bois.

In April 1916 Arthur had moved with the 8th Leicesters to the Doullens area for six weeks cleaning up, resting and training. In mid-May they returned once more to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont sector, but nearer Gommecourt. In June there was a series of nightly excursions into No-Man's Land with patrols attempting to gather information on the enemy's dispositions. On other occasions there were working parties out repairing the British barbed wire entanglements. The situation became increasingly hazardous as the month wore on when the Germans began to use a new and more accurate type of trench mortar.

The 8th Battalion did not participate in the first days of the Somme Offensive but was held in reserve. On 6th July Arthur's battalion left billets at Humbercamps and marched to Talmas, continuing on the following day to billets in Soues. On 10th July the battalion marched to Ailly-sur-Somme, entrained for Méricourt and travelled from there by lorry to bivouacs in Méaulte. Between 10th and 13th July the battalion was in the trenches near Fricourt and subjected to fairly continuous enemy fire.

On the 14th July the battalion was in action at the Battle of Bazentin Ridge. After the battle the battalion withdrew to Ribemont and then to Méricourt, and having entrained for Saleux, marched to Soues. From Soues the battalion moved to Longeau, Gouy-en-Ternois, Lattre St. Quentin and then to Arras where they went into the trenches on 29th July. Casualty figures for the battalion in July had been high: 17 officers and 415 other ranks had been killed, wounded or were missing.

The battalion went into Divisional Reserve at Agnez-les-Ouisans on 8th August but went back into the trenches at Arras on 18th August where they were on the receiving end of trench mortar bombs and heavy shells until 2nd September. They were relieved on 2nd September and marched to Duisans and on the following day proceeded to Lignereuil. On 13th September they marched to Frevent and entrained for Dernancourt. On 15th they reached a point between Fricourt and Méaulte before proceeding to Trônes Wood on 16th.

From 17th-23rd September the battalion was in reserve and supporting the troops in the front line by providing carrying parties. In the evening of 24th September the battalion marched up to take their position ready for an attack but before they reached this point the men were heavily shelled by the enemy. Just after midday on 25th September the 8th Leicesters launched a successful attack in waves on the right of Flers and then pressed on to Gueudecourt, Considerable losses, however, were suffered in this action.

Arthur was killed in action on 25th September, aged 26. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 2C and 3A and on the memorial at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon. He left his effects to his grandmother Rachel Thompson.

Lieutenant Albert William Hanford

 

15th Bn. Cheshire Regiment.

Killed in Action 22nd April 1918, Aged 30.

Buried Varennes Military Cemetery, II. C.2.

 

Lieut. Albert William Hanford, eldest son of Mr. Joseph & Emma Hanford, Hill Crest, Fearon street, Loughborough, and nephew of Ald. W. Hanford, J.P., he joined the colours in January 1915, and had seen considerable active service. He trained for his commission with the Officers Training Corps at Nottingham University. He belonged to the scholastic profession and had taught in the Loughborough schools and just before the war had been at Quorn C. of E. School. His Lieut.-Colonel writes to Mr. Hanford: "Your son was killed by machine gun fire whilst leading his men to the attack. The unit on our left was held up by a strong point, and your boy attacked in conjunction with the other battalion. He did his utmost and by his good leadership ensured the attempt being made in the strongest and best way possible. We all called him "Gus" and he was one of the most popular officers we had. He has done his duty consistently and well always and we miss him very much. We buried him yesterday beside his Company Commander. The deepest sympathy of all officers, N.C.O.'s and men of this battalion is extended to you and I trust God may give you and your wife extra strength to bear this terrible blow" The Chaplain wrote later that Lieut. Hanford was buried with full military honours adding: "I knew your son well and had the highest esteem for him as a man and the warmest admiration for him as a soldier."

Private 308650 William D. Hanson

11th Bn, Tank Corps.

Formerly 3036 Leicestershire  Regiment.

Killed in Action 8th October 1918, Aged 19.

Buried Prospect Hill Cemetery, Gouy, III. F. 4.

 
William standing left next to his brother
William was the son of Mr E. Hanson of 2 Mills Yard, Loughborough.
 

Corporal 11268 Leslie George Hardy

 

1st Bn, Coldstream Guards.

Killed in Action 8th October 1915,  Aged 20.

Buried Quarry Cemetery, Vermelles, A. I. 

 

Leslie George Hardy was born in 1894 at 16 Orchard Street, Tamworth, Staffordshire, the youngest child of Samuel Hardy, a grocer, and his wife Susannah Lavinia Gaunt. His parents were married in Sheffield in 1879. Leslie had one older brother William and five older sisters Mary Jane, Edith, Adelaide, Beatrice and Laura. By 1901 the family had moved to Brownhill, Burslem, and by 1911, when most of the children had left home, Samuel was living with Laura and Leslie at 109 Corporation Street, Stafford. Leslie, now aged seventeen, was an electrical engineer with Siemens Bros.

When war broke out Leslie, who was then living at 11, Western Avenue, Tring, Hertfordshire, returned home to Stafford and enlisted. He was appointed as Private 11268 in the 1st Battalion of the Coldstream Guards. He was sent to Aldershot for training and to France on 8th December 1914, around the time that his mother died. He took part in the winter operations from 1914-15. On 9th May 1915 his battalion took part in the Battle of Aubers Ridge, following which Leslie was promoted to the position of Corporal. The battalion spent the summer months at Lumbres, near St. Omer, and were then moved towards the Bethune, Lens area. Leslie lost his life, aged 20, on 8th October 1915 in action at the Battle of Loos.

Leslie's father retired to Woodbrook Cottage, Forest Road, Loughborough. Leslie's older brother William Gathorne Hardy, who was a civil engineer in Montreal, fought with the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force, was mentioned in despatches and survived the war.

Private 11789 Charles Henry Harris

 

6th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 29th September 1916.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial,  pier & face 2c 3a.

 

 

Charles Henry Harris was born in Leicester in 1882, the son of Charles Henry Harris, a hosiery trimmer, and his wife Sarah (formerly Needham, née Wragg Saywell) who were married in Leicester in 1880. Charles Henry Junior's mother Sarah had previously been married to Joseph Needham who died in 1871. Charles Henry Junior had three sisters Florence, Sarah and Lily Harris and four half-brothers from his mother's first marriage - Alfred, Edward, Libbaeus and Joseph Needham. The Harris/Needham family lived at 15 Bonners Lane, Leicester, and in 1901 Charles Henry Junior, aged 17, was a shoe pressman and between 1901 and 1908 had served for six years with the 1/4th (Territorial) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment.

In 1908 Charles Henry Junior married Mary Ann Fenton, a hosiery brusher, in Leicester and the couple set up home at 18 Percy Street, Leicester. The couple had five children: two (born and died between 1908 and 1910), Dorothy (born 1911), Charles (born and died 1912) and Florence (born and died 1914). After Florence died on 1st September 1914 Mary Ann moved to 10 Morley Street, Loughborough, with her only surviving child Dorothy.

When war broke out Charles Henry Junior, as a Class 1 National Reservist, was recalled by the Army. He reenlisted at Leicester as Private 11789 on 21st August 1914 and joined 6th (Service) Battalion of the Leicesters six days later. He was sent to Bordon, near Aldershot, Hampshire where the emphasis was on individual training, squadron and platoon drill. In March 1915 the battalion went into billets in Liphook. In April 1915 the 6th Battalion became part of the 37th Division of the Army and concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the 37th Division was inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July 1915 the Division began to cross the English Channel and by 2nd August all units were concentrated near Tilques not far from St.Omer in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais. Charles Henry arrived in France on on 30th July 1915.

In September Charles's battalion was sent to the area of Berles-au-Bois, south-west of Arras and near the front line. In the months that followed the 6th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 8th Leicesters who relieved them. The battalion was engaged in localised operations seeking a tactical advantage and remained in the area around Bienvillers and Bailleulmont until July 1916.

On 1st July 1916 the 6th Battalion moved from Saulty to Humbercamps, where it was held in reserve for the Somme Offensive which had just begun. On 6th July the battalion marched to Talmas to join the Army's 21st Division. From 7th to 10th July the battalion was in Hengest-sur-Somme, and from there on 10th marched to Ailly, entrained for Méricourt, took buses to Méaulte, and then proceeded to Fricourt. Between 14th and 17th July the battalion took part in an attack on and successfully captured Bazentin-le-Petit Wood and village. On 20th July the battalion entrained at Ribemont and detrained at Saleux, after which they marched to Hengest. Travelling part of the way in lorries and part of the way on foot they reached Arras on 27th July and relieved the 8th Leicesters in the trenches on 7th August. The remainder of August was spent in the trenches and in billets in Arras.

On 4th September the battalion left Arras for Liencourt and after a week there for training moved to Fricourt and Bernafay Wood, east of Montauban-de-Picardie. Here from 19th to 24th September the men were employed in the improvement of communication and support trenches in preparation for a forthcoming attack on Gueudecourt. On 25th September the 6th Leicesters moved up to the assembly trenches in order to be ready to support the 8th and 9th Leicesters as they advanced. Progress was made north and east of Gueudecourt but as the Leicesters consolidated their position the village itself and its approaches were heavily bombarded by the enemy. This situation remained the same over the next few days and Charles was killed in action on 29th September 1916, aged 34.

Charles is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial Pier and Face 2C and 3A.

His widow Mary Ann married Reginald E. Dean in Loughborough in 1917 and they had a daughter Mabel, born in 1917. This second marriage, however, was also shortlived as Reginald died in 1924. Mary Ann herself died four years later in 1928.

Private 242494 John Joseph Harris

 

1/6th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regt.)

Previously served as no. 7703.

Killed in Action 30th May 1917, Aged 23.

Buried Fosse No. 10 Communal Cemetery Extension, Sains-en-Gohelle, I. C. 1.

 

John Joseph Harris was born in late 1893 or early 1894 in Whitwick, Leicestershire. He was the second son of John Edward Harris and his wife Eliza Mary Agnes Harris (née Muston) who were married in Whitwick in 1885. John Joseph had two brothers William and Joseph and two sisters Mary and Annie. In 1901 the Harris family lived at Green Lane, Whitwick and John Joseph's father was a journeyman carpenter. By 1911 they had moved to 46 Cartwright Street, Loughborough. John Joseph, now 17, was a weaver for an elastic web manufacturer and his father was now employed as a wood machinist at a car works.

John Joseph's service papers have not survived but it is known that he enlisted in Nottingham and joined the1/6th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). This was a unit of the Territorial Force which was mobilised for war service on 5th August 1914 and became part of the 139 (Forester) Infantry Brigade in the Army's 46th (North Midland) Division. John Joseph joined C Coy of the 1/6th Battalion as Private 242494 but the exact date he joined is unknown. He was sent to France sometime in 1916 or early 1917. The battalion received drafts of reinforcements in March, May, July and December 1916 and in January and February 1917 and John Joseph could have been in any one of these drafts.

In the months of 1916 prior to the start of the Somme Offensive on 1st July the 1/6th Leicesters moved around between the areas of Coulonvillers, Beaumetz, Puchvillers, Mont St. Eloy, Acq, and Humbercamps. By 19th June the battalion was in the line facing Fonquevillers, where on 30th June they moved at night to battle assembly positions. On 1st July the battalion went into battle at Gommecourt but all attempts at advance were met with heavy artillery and machine gun barrage.

Withdrawn from the front line the battalion marched over three days to Bienvillers. They returned to the front line trenches on 11th July at Bretencourt, and from then on until the end of October did trench tours at Bretencourt, Bellacourt and Bailleulval. From the end of October until 6th December the battalion was in training mainly at Gapennes and Sus St. Leger before going into Divisional Reserve and then doing trench tours at Souastre until 6th February 1917.

Training continued throughout February 1917 at Halloy and Beaudricourt and in early March the battalion was back in the trenches at Foncquevillers. The battalion moved to St. Amand on 19th March and finally, after twelve days in transit on foot and by bus and train, to billets in Noeux-les-Mines. Four days later they were in the trenches near Angres before making two attacks on Lievin on 20th and 23rd April. In May the battalion was in the trenches east of Cité St. Pierre, with rest periods at Petit Sains. On 30th and 31st May the enemy made several raids on the British line.

John Joseph was killed in action on 30th May 1917, aged 23. He was buried in Fosse No. 10 Communal Cemetery Extension, Sains-en-Gohelle, Grave I. C. 1.

Private 240364 Samuel Halford Hartland

 

1/5th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 15th August 1917,  Aged 35.

Buried Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe,I. U. 50.

(his brother William H. Hartland also fell see below)  

 

Samuel Halford Hartland was born in Aston, Birmingham in 1882. He was the elder son of Samuel Hartland, a bricklayer, and his wife Sarah Ann (née Halford) who were married on 2nd July 1873 at the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Aston. Samuel Junior had one brother William and one sister Martha. Between 1891 and 1901 the family lived at 52 Francis Street, Aston. After Samuel's mother died in 1908 his father moved to 'Hartville', Hewlett Road, Cheltenham. Samuel Junior, a bricklayer like his father, came to work in Loughborough and lived in the Leicester Road, Shepshed.

On 11th September 1905 Samuel Junior married Rose Hannah Price at St. Botolph's Church, Shepshed. Samuel and Rose set up home at 10 Rosebery Street, Loughborough, and soon had three daughters Esther, Edith and Beatrice. Samuel secured employment as a labourer at the Falcon Works and became well known as a pianist and humourist in the town. Between 1911 and 1914 Samuel's younger brother William obtained employment at the Empress Works and came to live with Samuel and his family in Rosebery Street.

Samuel was a member of the local Territorials and was mobilised on the outbreak of war. As Private 2026 (later renumbered as 240344) in the 1/5th Leicestershire Regiment he was sent to Bishop's Stortford and then Luton for training. On 25th February 1915 the battalion was ordered to entrain at Harlow for Southampton. They landed at Le Havre three days later, having encountered very rough seas. They went by train to Arneke, and then marched to Hardifort. The battalion spent the first few months in France in the Armentières sector, training and doing tours in the trenches. For the whole of April they were in trenches near Wulverghem and subjected to continual sniping by the enemy. In June they moved to the Salient, firstly to Locre and Kemmel and then near Zillebeke and Ouderdom, where they remained until the beginning of October when they were ordered to move to Hesdigneul. Further moves followed to La Couture in November and Merville and Thienne in December

January 1916 was taken up with a potential move of Samuel's battalion to Egypt which was aborted at Marseilles, the battalion being returned to Candas, and the area of Vimy Ridge.

In mid-February 1916 the 1/5th Battalion took over the line north of the River Ancre opposite Beaumont-Hamel. On 29th February the battalion moved to the area of Doullens where the men worked on improving the trenches despite being subjected to a considerable bombardment from the enemy with mines and craters being blown.

From 9th March 1916 the 1/5th Leicesters were in the area of Vimy Ridge, Pas de Calais, either in the front line, in support, in reserve or at rest. On 27th April the battalion was sent to the neighbourhood of Neuville St. Vaast to work with the French and English tunnellers and then to billets in Luchaux for bayonet training. This was followed by a period at Souastre digging cable trenches, and constructing bomb stores and gun pits in preparation for a 'big push'.

On 4th June 1916 the battalion was moved up to trenches near Gommecourt. This was followed by further training at Warlincourt. During this time Samuel was allowed some home leave. On 30th June the battalion assembled in a trench near Foncquevillers Church ready for the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the first day of the Somme Offensive planned for 1st July.

On 1st July 1916 the 46th Division of the Army, of which the 1/5th Leicesters were part, had 2445 casualties at Gommecourt. On 7th July they relieved the 4th Lincolnshires in the trenches opposite Essarts-lès-Bucquoy. The battalion remained in the area of Monchy-au-Bois until 29th October, either in the trenches or resting at Bienvillers or Pommier. The battalion's next move was to Millencourt for intensive battle training, returning to Halloy and then Souastre at the beginning of December.

The battalion remained at Souastre until 11th March 1917 and then moved once more up to the line taking over 2,600 yards of frontage from the La Brayelle road to the Hannescamps-Monchy road. On 17th March they moved into Gommecourt for road mending before moving to Bertrancourt, Raincheval and then Rainvillers not far from Amiens.

On 28th March the battalion marched to Saleux, entrained for Lillers in the north, and marched to Laires. Training took place until 13th April and continued for three further days at Manqueville, after which the battalion moved to the western outskirts of Lens. From there they marched to Bully-Grenay and went into the front line trenches where they were heavily shelled. On 29th April the battalion went into rest billets in cellars at Cité St. Pierre until 3rd May when they went into support trenches. On 8th they went into billets at Fosse 10 near Petit Sains for training and on 12th into reserve at Angres. Further trench tours south-west of Lens followed until 26th May when the battalion went into billets at Marqueffles Farm for training in bayonet fighting and bombardment and to practise methods of attack. On 6th June the battalion was back in the line and on 8th June went into the attack, suffering 96 casualties.

Apart from two breaks at Red Mill from 9th-13th and 18th-20th June the battalion was in the trenches until 22nd June. On 21st June C Coy was accidentally gassed by the Royal Engineers, resulting in 94 casualties of whom 22 died. Back at Marqueffles Farm from 22nd the battalion had Lewis gun and signalling classes as well as attack training over a flagged course. On 27th June the battalion moved up to the line ready to attack on the following day. As they climbed out of the trenches on 28th June they met with the inevitable machine gun fire and over the next two days 60 Ordinary Ranks were killed.

Relieved from the trenches at Lievin on 3rd July the battalion moved to Monchy-Breton for reorganisation and training until 22nd July when they moved to Vaudricourt before going into the line at Hulluch until 28th July. After respite at Noeux-les-Mines the battalion was at Fouquières until 14th August, practising for an attack. Moving to Noyelles the battalion went into the trenches on 15th August. On the way up to the trenches an enemy shell landed by one party of soldiers, killing eleven men instantly and wounding fourteen. Samuel, aged 35, was one of those wounded. He died the same day and was buried in Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, Grave I. U. 50.

Samuel had been due to come home on his second leave the day after he died. His widow first received intimation in a letter from a comrade, who sent home a photograph of his wife and three children, which Pte. Hartland was carrying at the time. The Captain of Samuel's company wrote to his wife as follows: 'It is with great distress that I have to tell you of the death of your husband, Pte. Hartland, while in action. Over a week our battalion was in action and your husband was hit. I saw him when he was being carried down to the dressing station on a stretcher, and he spoke to me. I asked him if he was badly hit, and he said no, only it was difficult to breathe freely. Later in the dressing station he held up bravely, telling the doctors not to attend to him as there were others more badly hit than he. Personally I was struck by his coolness and courage, I think he was perfectly fine. Very soon afterwards he passed away. I have known him ever since he has been in my company, and have always found him a most reliable and excellent fellow. He was one of those men that one cannot spare. Please accept my deepest sympathy in your great trouble'.

Samuel is remembered on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon. His only brother William had been killed in action four months previously.

 

Private 15138 William Herbert Hartland

 

1st Bn, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regt.)

Killed in Action 14th April 1917, Aged 23.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial,  pier & face 10c 10d & 11a.

(his brother Samuel H. Hartland also fell see above)   

William Herbert Hartland was born in Birmingham on 8th June 1893 and baptised on 23rd August 1893 at the Church of St. James the Less, Ashted, Birmingham. He was the younger son of Samuel Hartland, a bricklayer, and his wife Sarah Ann (née Halford) who were married on 2nd July 1873 at the Church of St. Peter and St. Paul, Aston. William had one brother Samuel and one sister Martha. In 1901 the family lived at 52 Francis Street, Aston. After William's mother died in 1908 his father moved to 'Hartville', Hewlett Road, Cheltenham, but later moved to Loughborough. By 1911 William was an apprentice bricklayer and lodging in South Leverton, near Lincoln. Between 1911 and 1914 he obtained employment at the Empress Works in Loughborough and came to live with his brother and family at 10 Rosebery Street, Loughborough.

When William enlisted in 1914 he joined the 1st Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters as Private 15138. Although his service record has not survived it is known that he was sent to France on 11th May 1915. At that time the 1st Battalion was in the trenches near Laventie, north-east of Béthune, with rest periods at Estaires. In mid-August the battalion moved to the Fleurbaix/Bois Grenier area. Here further trench familiarisation began and the battalion went into the front line sector in mid-September. At Bois Grenier on 25th September the battalion was in action in an attack to capture part of the German front line as an adjunct to the Battle of Loos. The battalion remained in the Bois Grenier area for a considerable time instructing inexperienced troops.

On 3rd March 1916 orders were received to relieve the French 17th Division in the Carency sector, an area subject to severe shelling. After a break at Bruay in April the battalion moved back to the Souchez-Angres front line. In June the battalion went to Enguinegatte where intensive training commenced. On 25th June the battalion moved to Ailly-sur-Somme and in the Somme Offensive took part in the Battle of Albert from 1st to 10th July. On 11th July the battalion withdrew to Dernancourt and then to billets at Bresle. August was spent either resting in Béthune or in the trenches at Sailly-Labourse, September in the trenches or resting in the Fouquières area and the first half of October at Sandpits Camp near Albert before moving to Trônes Wood south of Longueval. In mid-November the battalion left Trônes Wood for the Château de Selincourt, near Dieppe, to undergo further training. On 29th December the battalion left Selincourt and entrained for Albert.

From 26th January to 4th March 1917 the battalion was operating in the Bouchevesnes sector, after which they moved via Moislains and Nurlu to Heudicourt. The Germans were retreating to the Hindenburg Line and the Allies were planning an attack on the enemy at nearby Gouzeaucourt. This attack began on the night of the 12th April and during this operation on 14th April 1917 William, aged 23, was killed in action.

William is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 10C, 10D and 11A.

Private 419325 Everard Clarence Harvey

 

2/2 (North Midland) Field Ambulance, Royal Army Medical Corps.

Killed in Action 26th September 1917, Aged 24.

Buried Bridge House Cemetery, Langemark-Poelkapelle, A. 19.

Everard Clarence Harvey was born in Loughborough in 1893 and baptised on 6th August 1893 at All Saints Church, Loughborough. He was the son of Benjamin Harvey and his wife Eliza (née Tabb) who were married at St. Botolph's Church, Shepshed, on 28th December 1895. Everard's father was a framework knitter and in 1891 the Harvey family lived at 12 Oxford Street, Loughborough. Everard had two brothers John and Albert and two sisters Elizabeth and Jane.

After Everard's father died in 1898, aged 40, Everard's mother moved to 44 Derby Road, Loughborough, with her three youngest children and became a beer house keeper. Everard's sister Jane acted as barmaid. By 1911 Everard, now 18, had secured employment at the Empress Works as an electrical pattern maker.

Everard enlisted at Leicester on 20th January 1915, giving his address as 124 Ratcliffe Road, Loughborough. As Private 2566 (later re-numbered as Private 419325) he was posted to the 2/2 (Reserve) North Midlands Field Ambulance of the Royal Army Medical Corps and sent to Watford for training. In April 1916 he was sent with his Field Ambulance to Dublin during the Easter Rising. On 6th June, in Dublin, he was given 168 hours detention for neglect of duty. Not long after this Everard must have been granted leave as he married Nellie Adcock in Loughborough in the summer of 1916.

After the end of the fighting in Dublin the 2/2 Field Ambulance had been sent to the Curragh for further training until the end of the year. In January 1917 they returned to England and after a brief stay in Gillingham, Kent, left Southampton for France on 23rd February 1917 on the SS Southwestern Miller cargo ship.

From the Gare des Marchandises, Le Havre, the 2/2 Field Ambulance travelled by train to Bayonvillers, Somme. From there, on 8th March, they marched to Proyart, south of Albert, and took over the Divisional Main Dressing Station and the Divisional Rest Station from the 1/3 Northumbrian 1st Field Ambulance.

When away from the trenches a field ambulance's role was to keep the fighting men fit and healthy. This was achieved by setting up Divisional Rest Stations [DRS] and baths (usually sited in a brewery where up to 50 men could be bathed at a time in the large vats). They were also allocated special tasks such as providing treatment for scabies, trench foot, and other ailments. When in the trenches the field ambulance's role was similar to modern day emergency ambulance services: to collect and transport patients to someone with specialised knowledge or to specialist equipment, whilst monitoring them, and treating them if necessary to ensure their condition remained stable. Before transport the casualties were usually seen at an Advanced Dressing Station (ADS) or Post (ADP) for bandaging and morphine injections as appropriate.

By 17th March the 2/2 Field Ambulance had extended the accommodation available at Proyart to 7 Adrian huts, 2 houses, 1 store tent, 2 marquees and 2 Indian tents allowing room for 650 lying cases and 1000 patients if sufficient staff were available. The numbers of casualties passing through the 2/2nd Field Ambulance were often quite high. During the period 23rd-29th March, for example, 468 casualties (sick and wounded) were admitted. After treatment 136 were discharged to duty while 334 were transferred to Casualty Clearing Stations for evacuation to Base Hospitals.

On 10th April the 2/2 Field Ambulance took over the Advanced Dressing Station in the church at Bouvincourt from the 2/1 North Midland Field Ambulance and also took over the Advanced Dressing Posts at Hancourt and Roisel. On 14th April the right Advanced Dressing Post was moved from Hancourt to Bernes. On 24th May the 2/2 Field Ambulance was instructed to prepare for a move to Léchelle. The site at Léchelle about five miles from the front line was prepared and the move took place on 30th May. On 24th August there was another move to the Royal Engineers Camp on the Bouzincourt-Aveluy road.

On 1st September the unit left the camp for Beaucourt, entrained for Godevaersvelde, marched to Watou and took over the hospital and billets there. On 15th September they moved from Watou to Hilhoek and took over the V Corps Rest Station. On the following day many sick were admitted and at 6.00pm there were 998 patients in the hospital.

Everard was killed in action, aged 24, on 26th September 1917, in the Battle of Polygon Wood (a phase of the 3rd Battle of Ypres, or Passchendaele) He was one of three members of the 2/2 Field Ambulance killed that day. Several others were wounded and gassed. Everard was buried in Bridge House Cemetery, Langemark-Poelkapelle, Grave A. 19. He is remembered on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building, Loughborough, and on the Carillon.

Everard's widow was married again in 1920 to John Thomas Brooksby and their daughter Betty was born in 1927.
 

Private 32733 John Albert Harvey

 7th Bn, South Staffordshire Regiment.

Formerly 47377 Notts & Derby Regiment.

Killed in Action 5th October 1917, Aged 24.

Commemorated Tyne Cot, panel 90-92 162-a.

 
 
John was the son of Mrs. Harvey 29 Rendell Street, Loughborough. John joined up in May 1916, in the Notts and Derby Regt, afterwards being transferred. At the time of enlistment he was a hosiery foreman at Messrs, Rowley's Derby, having been apprenticed with Messrs, Cartwright and Warners Loughborough. He was a former member of Stanford on Soar and Loughborough Emmanuel choirs, and of the "Squirrel" football club. The news of his death was conveyed in a letter from the Lieutenant of his company, who wrote:- "I regret having to inform you of the death of your son, Signaller John A. Harvey. He was killed after we had made a successful attack and reached our objective. He was a very good worker and was a very brave boy; every man in his platoon and company liked him. His brother signallers speak very highly of him. You have my deepest sympathy, and I hope that you will bear your bereavement bravely." Mrs. Harvey also received a letter of condolence from her son's chum in the company.
 

 

Private 1978 Gilbert Edwin Hawker

 

Leicestershire Yeomanry.

Killed in Action 13th May 1915, Aged 22.

Commemorated Ypres (Menin Gate)   Panel 5.

 

Gilbert was born in Darlington, Co. Durham, in 1893. He was the eldest son of Frank William Charles Hawker and his wife Winifred Florence (née Powell) who were married in Gloucester in 1887. Gilbert had two older sisters Evelyn and Marion and younger twin brothers Lawrence and Winfield. In 1901 the family were in Darlington where Frank Hawker had a job as a railway carriage draughtsman, but by 1911 they had moved to 65 Toothill Road, Loughborough as Frank Hawker had gained promotion to the position of estimator for a railway stock manufacturers.

Gilbert enlisted at Barrow in Furness (then in Lancashire) in 1913. He had been living there at 33 Storey Square since 1911 and he was an apprentice engineer.

Gilbert was killed in action at the Battle of Frezenberg Ridge.

Private 9385 Arthur Hayes

 

2nd Bn, Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regt.).
Previously 4th and 1st Sherwood Foresters

Killed in Action 31st July 1916,  Aged 30.

Commemorated Ypres (Menin Gate)   Panel 39 & 41.

 

Arthur Hayes was born in Sneinton, Nottingham, in 1886, the son of Robert Hayes and his wife Hannah (née Moore) who were married at Radford St. Peter on 13th February 1886. Arthur's father was a framework knitter and his mother a hosiery worker who subsequently became a lace hand. Arthur had a younger brother Robert and a younger sister Thirza. In 1891 the family lived at 8 Regent Hill, Nottingham, and in 1893 at 3 Florence Terrace, Nottingham.

By 1901, however, life had changed dramatically for the Hayes family: Arthur's father and his brother Robert had both died, and his sister Thirza was at St. Joseph's Catholic Home and Reformatory for Girls at Nether Hallam, Sheffield. Arthur and his mother, meanwhile, were boarding at 108 Red Lion Street, Nottingham, in the household of Samuel Greenwood, a widower with two young sons Arthur and Robert Greenwood and Arthur was working as a labourer on a potato farm. In 1903 Arthur's mother married Samuel Greenwood, a wooden box maker, and Arthur soon had twin step-brothers, Samuel and Harold. The family then moved to 29 Brassey Street, New Radford, Notts.

On 27th May 1904 Arthur, who had served with the militia in the 4th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (the Notts and Derby Regiment) since 17th June 1903, attested at Nottingham to join the Sherwood Foresters for a period of three years with the Colours and nine years in the Reserve. He was immediately posted to the Depot as Private 9385. On 24th November he was sent to Aldershot until 4th November 1905 when he was posted to join the 1st Battalion in Singapore and the Straits Settlements. In May 1906 he was hospitalised in Singapore for an inflamed abscess caused by an ill-fitting boot. In the same month he was awarded a Good Conduct badge. He then moved with his battalion to Bangalore, south India. On 26th May 1907 Arthur was transferred to the Army Reserve and returned to England.

In 1911 Arthur was employed as an underground collier and living at 69 Selhurst Street, Nottingham, with his mother, step-father, and twin half-brothers Samuel and Harold. In the summer of 1914 Arthur's step-father died and Arthur himself was recalled by his regiment. He rejoined the regiment at Derby on 5th August 1914 and moved on mobilisation to Cambridge. Arthur went to France on 10th October to join the 2nd Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters. On 18th-20th October the 2nd Battalion fought a major battle at Ennetières en Weppes on the way to Ypres, holding a vastly superior German force for 48 hours and losing in the process 16 officers and 710 other ranks. This action was followed by participation in the First Battle of Ypres (19th October - 22nd November 1914). On 11th November 1914 Arthur received ten days field punishment for drunkenness.

Following winter operations and extended trench warfare the 2nd Battalion was again in action on July 30th 1915 at Hooge where the enemy used 'liquid fire'. Arthur was present at Hooge although his health during the first half of 1915 had not been so good. He was wounded in the hand in February and then admitted to the Convalescent Home Base at St. Maur. In late March a septic abrasion caused him to be admitted to No. 4 Stationery Hospital at St. Omer. In June he was admitted to No. 16 Field Ambulance with facial inflammation. He returned to duty on 10th July in time for Hooge.

The battalion remained in the Ypres Salient trenches at St. Jean, Elverdinghe and Yser Canal Bank, with rest and training periods at Poperinghe until 18th March 1916 when they left Poperinghe for Herzeele and Wormhoudt. On 27th March they returned to Camp 'N' at Poperinghe for further training until 6th April when they entrained at Houpotre for Calais. Training continued at Beau Maris Camp, near Calais, until 15th April when they returned to Camp 'G' at Poperinghe and more tours in the trenches near Ypres.

On 6th May 1916 Arthur went to No. 50 Casualty Clearing Station in the field and was diagnosed as having bronchitis. He was sent by No. 17 Ambulance Train to No. 11 General Hospital at Camiers until 2nd June when he was moved to No. 6 Convalescent Depot at Etaples. By 9th July he had recovered and was attached to the 7th Battalion of the King's Own Royal (Lancaster) Regiment. Arthur joined them in the front line trenches north-east of Bazentin-le-Petit on the Somme on 30th July. He was killed in action, aged 30, the following day.

Arthur was reported to have been buried on the Somme but is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, Panel 39 and 41. His mother, who originally came from Leicestershire, moved to 7 Cradock Street in Loughborough after her second husband died in 1914. She later moved to 12 Providence Square and then to 1 King William Yard.

Private 14058 Herbert Haywood

 

8th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died a Prisoner of War 9th November 1918, Aged 23.

Buried Hautrage Military Cemetery, Belgium,  IV. A. 19.

 

Herbert was taken prisoner 27 May 1918.

Rifleman 322331 George Walter Hemstock

 

6th Bn, London Regt. (City of London Rifles.)

Killed in Action 3rd June 1917, Aged 23.

Buried H.A.C. Cemetery Ecoust-St. Mein. III. C. 12.

 

 

George Walter Hemstock was born in Loughborough in 1894 and baptised on 9th May 1894 at Emmanuel Church. He was the second son of George Hemstock and Ada Holwell Hemstock (née Wye) who were married at St. Mary's Church, Wymeswold, on 10th June 1890. George Junior had three brothers John, Arthur and Charles and two sisters Ada and Ellen. Two other brothers Alfred and Frank died young. George Junior's father was a milk seller and the family lived in Bedford Street, Loughborough, firstly at No. 7 and then at No, 22.

In 1911 George Junior was an office boy for Herbert Morris Ltd, lifting gear manufacturers, at the Empress Works in Moor Lane, Loughborough. He also worked at Beeston, Nottinghamshire, and later for a London firm. He was a member of the Emmanuel Church choir and the Church Lads Brigade.

In January 1916 he enlisted in Fulham, London and joined 1/6th Battalion (City of London Rifles) of the London Regiment, a Territorial Force. The London Regiment was the largest infantry regiment in the army with 26 battalions in peacetime, eventually increasing to 88 battalions over the course of the First World War. It was also the only regiment in the army that did not have a regimental badge - each battalion having its own individual cap badge. The 1/6th Battalion had its headquarters in the Farringdon Road, EC1, and was nicknamed as 'The Cast Iron Sixth'.

George became Rifleman 322331. The date on which he was sent to France is unknown as his service papers have not survived but it is likely to have been toward the end of 1916 as in the autumn of 1916 George married Ada Henson, a hosiery factory worker, in Loughborough. On 28th November 1916 the 1/6th Battalion received a draft of reinforcements while they were at Scottish Wood Camp, south-west of Ypres, and another on 24th December. (Scottish Wood Camp was used as a rest and training area between Dickenbusch and the front line area at Vormezeele.) A further draft of men arrived in March 1917. George could have been in any of these drafts.

On 8th December 1916 the battalion went into the front line trenches at the Bluff, Zillebeke, where they experienced machine gun fire and sniping from the enemy as well as enemy aircraft surveillance. They moved to the support trenches on 21st December and provided working parties for draining, clearing and repairing the trenches. Relieved on 28th December the battalion marched to Ypres Station and entrained for Dominion Camp, proceeding to Scottish Camp on the 29th. They remained at Scottish Camp until 8th January 1917, practising a new signalling scheme and on wiring drill. The battalion then returned to the support trenches at Hill 60 before moving to the front line on January 14th. Breaks followed at Halifax and Scottish Camps, and at Dickenbusch Huts and Canal Reserve Camp for training until 20th February when the battalion returned to the Bluff. Here a successful attack on the enemy took place, but not without more than a few casualties.

At the end of March the battalion was back in the Canal Sector of the Bluff, either in dugouts or in the line. They remained there for the first two weeks of April, the rest of the month being spent at Dominion Camp before a return to the trenches in the Spoil Bank sub-sector, west of Ypres, on 27th April where they were heavily shelled. Relieved on 3rd May the battalion moved to Canal Reserve Camp, Dickenbusch, until 12th May when they transferred to Ontario Camp, Rehinghelst, before moving to Acquin for training until 31st May. The battalion's next move was to Ouderdom.

On 3rd June George, aged 23, was killed by a shell at Ouderdom, death being instantaneous. He was buried at the Honourable Artillery Company (H.A.C.) Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Mein, Grave III. C. 12. He is remembered on the memorials in Emmanuel Church and in the former St. Peter's Church building, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon.

George's brother John served with the 7th Auckland Mounted Rifles of the New Zealand Forces and his brother Arthur with the Sherwood Foresters. Both survived the war. George's widow was remarried in 1927 to Frank G. Pinchien and moved to Manchester.

Driver T/260721 Reginald Henman

 

2nd Reserve Park, Army Service Corps.

Killed in Action 29th January 1918, Aged 19.

Buried Brandhoek New Military Cemetery, II. O. 1.

 

Reginald was the son of Philip & Ruth Henman of 8 Glebe Street, Loughborough. He had been on active service four months, having joined up from the Empress Works. News received by the parents stated that driver Henman was taking food up to the front line trenches when he was killed by a shell.

Private 77957 Frank Henson

 

15th Bn, Durham Light Infantry.

Formerly 37553 Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 31st March 1918, Aged 19.

Commemorated Poziers Memorial, Somme, panel 68 - 72.

 

Frank was the son of Edward Stevenson & Clara Henson of 15 Falcon Street, Loughborough.
 

Private 7290 Leonard Henson

 

2nd Bn, Coldstream Guards.

Died of Wounds 25th September 1914, Aged 25.

Buried City of Paris Cemetery 6. 21. 28. 

 

Leonard Henson was born on 7th August 1889 in Loughborough. He was the son of Frank Henson, a wood labourer, and Ann Henson (née Hopkins) who were married in Loughborough in 1875. Leonard had five older brothers John, Edward, William, Harry and George and two younger sisters Mary and Lilian. In 1891 the family lived at 56 Lower Cambridge Street, Loughborough. By the time Leonard was 10 years old he had sadly lost both his parents, his mother having died in 1898 and his father in 1899.

Leonard was educated at Emmanuel Boys School in Loughborough and at the age of 17, on 11th June 1907, he enlisted, joining the Coldstream Guards as Private 7290. In 1911 he was living at Ramillies Barracks, Aldershot. Sometime between 1911 and 1914 he left the Guards to join the Leicestershire Constabulary, and was stationed at New Swannington. When World War One broke out Leonard joined his old regiment the Coldstream Guards and served with them in the 2nd Battalion, landing at Le Havre, France on 13th August 1914.

Leonard was wounded by a shell on 23rd September 1914 during the Battle of Aisne, tragically dying from his injuries two days later in Claridges Hotel, Paris. Having been brought in on the night of September 23rd the doctor wrote that after being "very brave and patient, he passed away quietly at half-past four on Friday 25th".

Private Leonard Henson is buried in the City of Paris Cemetery, Pantin (at the N.E of the city, on the road to Le Bourget), with the grave reference 6.21.28. He is commemorated on the Carillon and at Loughborough Emmanuel Church.

Able Seaman Bristol Z/4430 Randall Henson

 

188th Bde, Machine Gun Coy. R.N. Reserve.

Killed in Action 9th April 1918,  Aged 19.

Buried Englebelmer Communal Cemetery Ext. B. 17. 

 

Randall was the son of James & Ellen Henson of 65 Cambridge Street, Loughborough.

Able Seaman Bristol Z/4047 Cyril Norman Hicklin

 

Drake Bn, R.N. Div, Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve.

Killed in Action 21st August 1918.

Commemorated Vis-En-Artois Memorial,  panel 1 & 2.

 

 

Cyril's Mother lived at Woodgate, Loughborough.

Private 40405 Arnold Hickling

2/5th Bn, North Staffordshire Regiment.

Formerly 65899 Notts & Derby Regiment.

Killed in Action 21st March 1918.

Commemorated Arras Memorial, bay 7 & 8.               

 

Gunner 113326 John Thomas Hickling

 

60th Siege Bty, Royal Garrison Artillery.

Died of Wounds 4th June 1917,  Aged 34.

Buried Noeux-Les-Mines Communal  Cemetery, I. T. 15.

 

John Thomas Hickling was born in Wymeswold in 1882. He was the son of William Hickling and his wife Caroline (née Bishop and known as 'Carrie') who were married at St. Mary's Church, Wymeswold, on 27th November 1873. John's father was initially a labourer but by 1891 he had become a framework knitter and had moved his wife and family to 36 Russell Street, Loughborough. He then progressed to being a hosiery machine moulder and caster framesmith. John had one sister Sarah and one brother George; another sister Hannah had died under the age of one. John's parents later moved to 45 Cobden Street.

By 1901 John, aged 18, was working as a printer compositor for the Loughborough Echo printing works. By 1911 he had left Loughborough and was working as a printer in Stamford, Lincolnshire, and lodging at the home of Agnes Shaw Swanson, a widowed music teacher, in 17 Recreation Road, Stamford. On 26th December 1914 he married Clara Yates at St. Michael's Church, Stamford. John and Clara set up home at 19 Vine Street, Stamford, later moving to 6 Conduit Street.

John attested at Stamford on 10th December 1915. He was mobilised on 8th August 1916 and joined the Royal Garrison Artillery as Gunner 13326. He was undergoing training at No. 2 heavy and Siege Depot at Gosport, Hampshire, when his daughter Irene was born in Stamford on 10th November 1916.

John was posted to France on 8th March 1917 and from the base there was sent to join the 60th Siege Battery on 18th March. Siege Batteries were equipped with heavy howitzers, sending large calibre high explosive shells in high trajectory, plunging fire. The usual armaments were 6 inch, 8 inch and 9.2 inch howitzers, although some had huge railway- or road-mounted 12 inch howitzers. As British artillery tactics developed, the Siege Batteries were most often employed in destroying or neutralising the enemy artillery, as well as putting destructive fire down on strongpoints, dumps, store, roads and railways behind enemy lines.

Just under three months later on 4th June 1917 John died of wounds received in action in the area of Sailly-Labourse, south of Béthune. He was aged 34. His Major, writing to John's wife said: 'Gunner Hickling was a good soldier, much liked by all of us, and he is worthily numbered among the heroes who died for their country's service'.

John was buried in Noeux-Les-Mines Communal Cemetery, Grave I. T. 15.

Sergeant 11450 John Henry (Harry) Hill

 

2nd Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 13th January 1916, Aged 33.

Commemorated Basra  Memorial Iraq, panel 12.

 

Registered at birth as Henry Hill but usually known as Harry, he was born in Loughborough in 1883, the youngest child and only son of John Henry Hill, an iron moulder and his wife Ellen (née Sewell). Harry's parents were married in Leicester in 1871.

Harry had four older sisters: Mary Ann, Christiana, Elizabeth and Caroline. In 1881 the family lived at 12 Rectory Place, Loughborough, but by 1891 they had moved to 33 Canal Bank, Bridge Street. His mother was widowed by 1901 but she stayed living at 33 Canal Bank with her two youngest daughters Elizabeth and Caroline and worked as a charwoman. She later moved to 7 Holland Street, Loughborough.

Harry Hill, who was a general labourer, married Emma Fallows at Loughborough Parish Church on 25th August 1906, but there do not appear to have been any children from this marriage. When war broke out in 1914 Harry and Emma were living at 4 Chapel Square, Nuneaton, Warwickshire, but after Harry enlisted his wife moved to 17 Derby Square, Loughborough.

In 1914 Harry was 32 years old and his army medical records reveal that he was just over 5ft 9in tall, and had blue eyes and brown hair. He had already been with the 3rd Leicestershire Territorial Battalion for a year and, as an Army Special Reservist, had received call-up papers at the start of the war. He reenlisted at Leicester on 7th August 1914 under his father's name of 'John Henry Hill' rather than his own official name of 'Henry Hill' and was sent immediately with the rank of Private 11450 to the regiment's Leicester Depot for recruits' training. On 12th August 1914 he was appointed a paid Lance Corporal with the 3rd Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment and was posted on the following day to Portsmouth. On 14th September 1914 he was promoted to Corporal and appointed Acting Sergeant. On 9th November 1914 he was promoted to Sergeant and posted to the 1st Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment which was already in Flanders. He joined the battalion which was fighting at the 1st Battle of Ypres.

On 13th February 1915 Harry was reposted to the 2nd Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment. In 1915 the 2nd Battalion of the Leicesters, part of an Indian Army formation led by Major General Charles Blackader, took part in the Battles of Neuve Chapelle (10th-13th March) and Aubers Ridge (9th May), the first day of the Battle of Festubert. The 2nd Leicesters spent the next couple of months alternately in the trenches or in billets while war training, in the area of Calonne and Vieille Chapelle north-east of Bethune. The corps was then rested in a quiet sector before being deployed for the Battle of Loos.

The initial attack at Loos was made by three divisions, with the Meerut Division leading the attack on the Indian Front. Blackader's brigade, with two Gurkha battalions and the 2nd Leicesters was on its right flank. Whilst the attack successfully crossed no-man's land under cover of the barrage, the right flank of the brigade was caught up in defensive wire and only one battalion successfully made its way into the German trenches. Gas also affected some of the men and the smoke caused a dense fog, making direction difficult. Harry was fortunate to survive the initial attack at the Battle of Loos on 25th September 1915 - from his battalion 72 men were killed, 217 were wounded, 42 were gassed and 96 were recorded as missing.

The 2nd Battalion was rather depleted after the Battle of Loos, but was ordered to the Persian Gulf where Britain was fighting Turkish forces allied to the Germans. On 5th December 1915 Harry embarked at Marseilles and arrived at Basra on 31st December 1915. From there he travelled by boat up the River Tigris to Ali Gharbi, 150 miles south-east of Baghdad.

In Mesopotamia General Townshend and his troops were under siege at Kut. On January 4th 1916 General Aylmer's leading troops, under Major General Younghusband, began to advance from Ali Gharbi towards Sheikh Sa'ad, with the intention of relieving General Townshend at Kut.

The Turkish commander Nur-Ur-Din had, however, effectively blocked any progress by placing approximately 22,500 troops and 72 guns on both banks of the Tigris at Sheikh Sa'ad, about 16 miles downstream from Kut. General Aylmer therefore ordered an attack on the enemy and very heavy fighting ensued on 7th January at the Battle of Sheikh Sa'ad.

On January 9th, the Turks were forced to abandon their remaining positions and retired upstream, followed by Major General Younghusband's force. Heavy rain now fell, however, making the alluvial soil of the roads almost impassable, and prevented active operations for the next two days.

The enemy fell back about ten miles, to the Wadi - a tributary which joins the Tigris on the left bank. They took up a new position behind the Wadi and on the right bank of the Tigris, opposite the mouth of the Wadi. General Aylmer concentrated his whole force on the left bank and attacked the Wadi position on the 13th. Harry had only just joined his battalion in the field on 11th January 1916. Two days later he was killed in action.

Harry was awarded the 15 Star, British War and Victory Medals. He is remembered on the Basra War Memorial, Iraq, Panel 12 and on the Holy Trinity Church War Memorial, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon.
 

Private 13421 John Samuel Hill

 

13th Bn., Canadian Mounted Rifles.

Died of appendicitis 19th March 1915, Aged 41.

Buried Lethbridge (St Augustine's) Cemetery, Canada, 17. 13 . G. 3.

 

John was the son of Edward Henry and Mary Ann Hill of 41 Leopold Street, Loughborough. John, a joiner, and his wife Kate and their two children emigrated to Canada in 1912 (the year that John's mother died) and settled at 619, 6th Street, Lethbridge, Alberta. After her husband's death John's widow Kate moved to Suite 8, Logan Block Corner, Logan & Sherbrooke Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba. 
need photo

Private 46441 Harold Hipkins

 

15th Bn, Durham Light Infantry.

Killed in Action 15th August 1918.

Commemorated Vis-En Artios Memorial, panel 9.

 

Private 14061 Ernest (Dick) Hitherley

 

10th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died at Home 2nd March 1916, Aged 42.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery Grave 14/236

(Ernest Hitherley's nephew John Albert Hitherley also fell See below)

 

Ernest Hitherley (or Hitherly) was born in 1873, the youngest of thirteen children of John Hitherley (or Hitherly), a bricklayer's labourer, and his wife Eliza (née North) of Wellington Street, Loughborough. His parents were married in Loughborough in 1846. Ernest seems to have been known to his family and friends as 'Dick Hitherley'.

When he was five Dick had an unfortunate accident, which was reported in the Nottingham Evening Post (16th January 1879) as follows:

'Accident to a child at Loughborough - On Tuesday last an accident of a serious nature occurred to a child aged five years, named Ernest Hitherley. The child's parents live in Wellington Street and on the morning named he went downstairs unknown to his mother and went and stood against the fire with nothing on but his night shirt. The result was that a piece of burning wood fell out of the grate and set the shirt on fire. The child at once cried out and the mother immediately ran down and with difficulty extinguished the flames. Not, however, before the unfortunate little fellow had received severe injuries in the right thigh and hand and he had to be conveyed to the Dispensary, where he now lies.'

Dick fortunately recovered apart from some scarring and grew up to become a labourer. When he was nineteen and living at 77 Pinfold Gate he was fined at Loughborough Police Court for being drunk and disorderly in Pinfold Gate. After that date there is no record of him until September 1914. When war broke out he enlisted and joined the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 14061. Ernest did not give his official forename when he enlisted but gave his name as 'Dick Hitherley'. He also concealed his true age at the time (he was 40, not 33 as he stated).

On 5th September 1914 Dick was sent to the Leicestershire Regiment Depot, and on 24th September he joined the 8th Service Battalion at Bramley, near Leeds. He was transferred to the 10th Leicestershire Regiment at Castle Barnard, County Durham, on 12th June 1915. He was discharged from the Army on 28th January 1916 at Rugeley Camp, Cannock Chase, Staffordshire as 'no longer physically fit for war service'. On discharge he intended to reside at 9 Mills Yard, Loughborough. The medical report on discharge stated that he was suffering from 'tuberculosis of the lung' and was no longer able to work. He had suffered from bronchitis during the winter of 1910-11 'and the cough had never completely left him. The cough has got steadily worse since he arrived at Barnard Castle in July [sic] 1915. He is rapidly losing flesh'. His discharge papers also included a note testifying to his good character.

Dick died in Loughborough at the beginning of March. On 9th March 1916 the Loughborough Echo printed a brief report of his funeral:

'MILITARY FUNERAL,

The death took place last Thursday of Private Richard Hitherley, of the 10th Leicesters, aged 38. Deceased enlisted in September, 1914, and in January was discharged owing to ill-health. He returned to his relatives in Mills-yard, Woodgate, where he died. The funeral was on Saturday, and was attended by bearer and firing parties from Glen Parva Barracks.
'

The reporter from the Echo, having heard the deceased referred to as 'Dick' must have wrongly assumed that his official forename was 'Richard'.

Ernest Hitherley

Has no memorial on his grave.


Lance Corporal 27967 John Albert Hitherley

 

12th Bn and 2/6th Bn, Sherwood Foresters

Missing, presumed dead 21st March 1918, Aged 29.

Commemorated Arras Memorial, bay 7.

(John Albert Hitherley's uncle Ernest Hitherley also died See above)

 

John Albert Hitherley, usually known as 'Albert Hitherley' was born in Loughborough in 1889. He is likely to have been the natural son of Lizzie Bertha (otherwise known as Elizabeth or Eliza) Hitherley, a hosiery joiner. Albert had a brother or possibly half-brother, Walter Lawrence L. Hitherley (usually known as 'Lawrence Hitherley') ten years younger than himself.

In 1901 Albert and Lawrence were living with their widowed grandmother Eliza Hitherley and her unmarried daughter Elizabeth at 8 Market Street, Loughborough. Elizabeth died, aged 36, in 1902 and in 1904 Albert and Lawrence's grandmother Eliza also died.

Ten years later Albert had become a tile maker for a brick manufacturer's and was lodging at 86 Russell Street, Loughborough, while Lawrence was living with his aunt Mrs. Catherine Wakerley and her husband John and family at 62 Russell Street. In March 1914 Albert, now a labourer, confessed to police that he had set fire to a waggon containing hay at Mr. W. B. Smith's farmyard in Meadow Lane, Loughborough, and was sent for trial at the Quarter Sessions. He said that he had committed the crime because he had 'no money and nowhere to go' and did not want 'to sleep rough'.

Albert served his punishment term and on release enlisted as 'Albert Hitherley' (rather than 'John Albert Hitherley') with the 12th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) as Private 27967. He did well with the Army and he was subsequently promoted to the position of Lance Corporal with the Foresters 2/6th Battalion.

No records have survived detailing when Albert was sent to France, when he was posted from 12th Battalion to the 2/6th Battalion, or when he was promoted to Lance Corporal.

Albert was officially presumed dead on 21st March 1918. In March 1918 the 2/6th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters was in the area of Noreuil in the Arras arrondissement of the Pas de Calais. From 11th to 20th March they occupied the front line. On 21st March the battalion was subjected to a very heavy enemy barrage from 5.30am to 9.30am. This was followed by an enemy attack during which the battalion suffered very heavy casualties. Albert's body was never found.

Albert is remembered on the Arras Memorial, Bay 7, his surname being incorrectly inscribed as 'Hitherby'.


Private 270428 T. Hoe

 

54th Bn, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regiment.)

Killed in Action 30th September 1918,  Aged 35.

Buried Cantimpre Canadian Cemetery, Sally, C. 27.

 

Son of George & Mary Hoe of Walton Le Wolds Loughborough. Husband of Lucy Hoe of 8 Warners Lane Church Gate Loughborough.

Gunner 231482 Charles Sidney Holmes

 

C Bty. 82nd Bde., Royal Field Artillery.

Killed in Action 21st March 1918.

Commemorated Pozieres  Memorial, Somme, panel 7 - 10.

 

Corporal 216751 Harry Holmes M.M.

 

78th Bn, Canadian Infantry (Manitoba Regiment.)

Killed in Action 30th March 1918,  Aged 35.

Buried Villers Station Cemetery XII. B. 7. 

 

Harry was the son of Mr. H. Holmes of the Blacksmith Arms, Loughborough. He joined up in Canada, had been in France about a year and was in Loughborough on leave last Christmas 1917. At one time he was at the Loughborough Free Library, and left for a better position near Birmingham, leaving later for Canada. He had two brothers in the Canadian army in France, Fred who was wounded in 1915, and Sidney.  

Gunner 89026 Stephen Thomas Holt

 

116th Heavy Bty.  Royal Garrison Artillery.

Died of Wounds 24th February 1918,  Aged 32.

Buried Maroeuil British Cemetery IV. G.1. 

 

Stephen was the son of Walter & Frances Holt of Hall Farm Nanpantan, Husband of Sarah Lizzie Holt of Ashby Road, Loughborough.

Second Lieutenant William Leslie Holt

 

10th Bn. York & Lancaster Regiment.

Killed in Action 22nd December 1917,  Aged19.

Buried Spoilbank Cemetery, Zillebeke, II. B. 8.

 

William was the last surviving son of the Rev. Alfred and Mrs. Holt, The Oaks Vicarage, Loughborough, he was educated at the Wygeston Boys School and Loughborough Grammar School. He belonged to the School Cadet Battalion, and on leaving joined the Notts University O. T. C. He was transferred later to the York and Lancs, Regiment on March 28 1917. He was slightly wounded in July, and returned to France from home leave on November 30th.

Private 42954 Harry Hopewell

 

1st Bn, Cambridgeshire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 17th October 1918, Aged 37.

Buried Houchin British Cemetery, III. A. 9.

 

Private 12077 Ernest Hopkins

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 14th July 1916,  Aged 20.

Buried Heilly Station Cemetery  Somme, II. B. 20. 

 

 

Ernest Hopkins was born in 1896 in Loughborough, the son of William Henry Hopkins, a stonemason, and his wife Charlotte (née Condon) who were married in Loughborough in 1886. Ernest had four brothers Walter, Frederick, Thomas and William and four sisters Winifred, Lilian, Nellie and Ivy. In 1901 the family lived at 53 New King Street, Loughborough. Ernest's father died in 1903 and by 1911 his widowed mother had moved with the family to 81 King Street.

Ernest enlisted at Loughborough and joined the 7th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 12077. On enlistment he would have been sent to Aldershot, Hampshire, for training. In April 1915 the 7th Battalion became part of the 37th Division of the Army and concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the 37th Division was inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill.

Ernest went to France on 25th August 1915 where his battalion gathered with the 37th Division at Tilques, near St. Omer. In September the 7th Battalion was sent to the area of Berles-au-Bois, south-west of Arras. The battalion remained in this area around Bienvillers and Bailleulmont until April 1916 and was engaged in localised operations seeking a tactical advantage. When not in the trenches being subjected to enemy shelling the 7th Leicesters received intensive training in bombing, Lewis gunnery, visual signalling and a host of other activities. In April 1916 they were moved to the Doullens area and formed working parties to cut down trees and prepare brushwood for the front line as well as preparing the support trenches in the area. In May they worked on building a new railway line between Le Bret and Bienvillers-au-Bois. Towards the end of May the battalion returned to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont area.

At the beginning of July the 7th Battalion moved on to the Somme. They were at Fricourt on 13th July and at Mametz Wood and in the attack on Bazentin-le-Petit on the following day. Ernest was hit by a shell in the Battle of Bazentin Ridge near Albert on 14th July and lost both his legs. He died from his wounds, aged 20, and is buried in Heilly Station Cemetery, Méricourt-L'Abbé, Grave II. B. 20.

Sergeant 10 Joseph H. Hopkins

 

Canadian Artillery.

Killed in Action 29th October 1917,  Aged 32.

Buried Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, poperinge, XXI. AA. 12A.

 

A FAMILY OF FIGHTERS

Sergt. J. H. Hopkins, was the son of William & Mary Hopkins of Loughborough. He was one of six brothers serving. He had been out on Canada for ten years, prior to which time he worked with two firms of dyers in Loughborough. His brother Leonard is in hospital suffering from gas poisoning, Bert is suffering from trench fever, Ernest the eldest is in he Bedfordshire Regt., Arthur in the R.A.M.C., and Wilfred with the A.S.C. Sergt. Hopkins sister lived at 5 Dead Lane Loughborough.

 
Joseph's Memorial Plaque.
 

Private 53075 Tom Edgar Houlson

 

20th Bn, The King's (Liverpool Regiment).

Formerly 18786 Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 13th December 1916, Aged 21.

Buried Berles Position Military Cemetery. B. 3.

 

Tom Edgar Houlson was born in Openshaw, Manchester in 1895. In some records his surname is misspelt as 'Houlston'. He was the youngest son of George Houlson, a schoolmaster from Bristol, and his wife Emily (née Turl) from Rockbeare, Devon, who were married at Bath Register Office in 1879. Tom had three brothers Alfred, Vere and Cyril and one sister Emma. Two other brothers Ernest and Reginald had died young.

Tom's mother died in 1899 and in early 1901 Tom, aged six, was living with his widowed father and Alfred and Cyril at 28 Station Road, Higher Openshaw. Vere had already enlisted with the Royal Engineers and was in Chattenden Barracks, Strood, Kent and Emma's whereabouts are unknown. After Tom's father died later in 1901 the family appears to have split up. In 1911 Tom, aged 14, was in the National Children's Home, Crowthorne Road, Edgworth, near Bolton, Lancashire and working as a farm labourer. Alfred was married and living in Lincoln, Cyril, who in 1906 had been living in Hartington Street, Loughborough, was in lodgings in Lincoln, Vere was in lodgings in Gorton, Manchester and Emma was in service in Gorton.

Between 1911 and 1915 Tom left Lancashire for employment with the Brush electrical engineering company in Loughborough. He enlisted in Loughborough but his service record has not survived and his date of enlistment is unknown. He initially joined the 10th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 18786 but at some point was transferred to the 20th (Service) Battalion (4th City) of the King's (Liverpool Regiment), a Pals battalion, as Private 53075.

On 10th April 1915 the 10th Battalion of the Leicesters was converted into a Reserve Battalion, moving to Barnard Castle in June and to Rugeley Camp, Cannock Chase in November. Exactly when Tom was transferred to the King's (Liverpool Regiment) is unknown but he appears not to have gone to France before 1916 as he was not awarded the 1914/15 Star medal. Between 4th March and 24th October 1916 the 20th Battalion of the King's received substantial drafts of men as reinforcements on fourteen occasions and Tom could have been among any of these drafts.

During March 1916 the battalion was in the trenches at Maricourt and subjected to fierce enemy fire. Breaks from the trenches were at Etinhem Camp and billets at Corbie. In April the battalion assisted the Royal Engineers with construction work on the light railway, pipelines, roads and shelters at Bray and unloading barges at Froissy Quay. In early May the battalion was back in the Maricourt trenches. This was followed by work with the Royal Engineers Tunnelling Company. From 27th May until 11th June practice attacks on the enemy took place after which the battalion entrained at Ailly-sur-Somme for Heilly and Billon Wood to provide carrying and entrenching parties. By 24th June the battalion had returned to the Maricourt trenches.

At the opening of the Somme Offensive on 1st July the battalion took part in the assault on Montauban and suffered heavy losses, compounded by further losses on the following days until ordered to move to Etinhem on 19th July. Ten days later they were in action again in an attack on Maltz Horn Ridge in the first battle for Guillemont, with further massive losses of men. For most of August the remainder of the battalion was withdrawn from the front line for training but returned to the support lines at Cuinchy on 27th August where they were heavily shelled. From 4th-18th September the battalion was in Brigade Reserve at Hingette, Le Touret and La Pierrière after which they entrained for Doullens and Gezaincourt, marched to Vignacourt and underwent further training until the end of September. On 4th October they moved to Dernancourt to await orders for the Battle of Le Transloy. On 10th October the battalion went into the support position at Bazentin Le Grand, moving up to the assembly trenches at Eaucourt l'Abbaye the next day.

On 12th October the battalion went into the attack at Gueudecourt and came under intense enemy machine gun fire. Two days later they moved away from the front line to a position between Montauban and Bazentin Le Grand. After another two days part of the battalion went into support at Flers and the rest to bivouacs near the transport lines. The whole battalion was in Mametz Wood camp by 22nd October and on 26th October entrained for Doullens to take billets in Halloy. A few days in Divisional Reserve at Pommier followed, with a return to the front line trenches at Fonquevillers on 4th November. Here they remained, with rest periods at Humbercamps and Berles until mid-December.

On 13th December, following a concentrated bombardment on the Monchy Salient by the Corps Artillery a raiding party from the battalion went forward to inspect the enemy trenches. Three men in the raiding party were killed, one of them being Tom Houlson, aged 21. Tom was buried in Berles Position Military Cemetery, Grave B. 3. He is remembered on the Brush Company memorial (in the Carillon War Memorial Museum) as well as on the Carillon.

Private 12838 Cephus Howard

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died 8th November 1918,  Aged 32.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery 38-313.

 

MILITARY FUNERAL

There have been no fewer than three Military funerals at Loughborough this week. On Wednesday the grave closed over the mortal remains of Cephus Howard, of Wellington Street, Loughborough, who had served in the Leicestershire Regiment, and had been discharged on August 27thafter four years service with the colours. He had been a fitter at the Empress Works. Son of William & Eliza Howard.

Private G/15074 Harry Howard

 

12th Bn, Royal Sussex Regiment.

Killed in Action 17th October 1916, Aged 28.

Commemorated Thiepval  Memorial, Somme, pier & face 7 C.

 

Harry Howard was born in 1888 in Loughborough, the son of Henry Howard and his wife Elizabeth (née Mills) who were married at All Saints Church, Loughborough, on 15th November 1879. In 1881 Harry's father was a labourer in an iron foundry but ten years later he was a joiner's labourer, later becoming a sawyer and then a filler's labourer. His mother was a hosiery seamer. Harry had an older brother Arthur and an older sister Alice. In 1891 the Howard family lived at 18 Queen Street, Loughborough, but by 1901 had moved to 26 Union Street.

Harry's mother unfortunately died in 1903, aged 47, and in the following year Harry's father married a widow Alice Pollard, who brought three of her younger children Arthur, Elizabeth and Ernest Pollard into the household which was now at 26 Havelock Street, Loughborough. By 1911 Harry's brother Arthur and sister Alice were living with relations elsewhere in Loughborough, but where Harry was at this time is unknown.

Harry's service papers have not survived and it is therefore impossible to establish when he enlisted with the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 4607. At some point he transferred to the 12th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment (2nd South Down) as Private G/15074 but again the date of transfer is unknown. It is possible, however, that he was sent to France in March 1916 when the 39th Division of the Army received substantial reinforcements which included the 12th Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment. Alternatively he may have joined the 12th Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment in France on 24th July 1916 or 4th or 12th September 1916 when the battalion received drafts of extra men. One detail is certain - Harry was not in France before 1916 as he was not awarded the 1914/15 Star Medal.

In March 1916 the 12th Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment, having landed at Le Havre, joined its Army division which was concentrating at Blaringhem. The battalion then moved via Morbecque, Estaires, Fleurbaix, La Gorgue, Caudescure and Riez- du-Vinage to the Givenchy sector where it went into the front line from 15th -30th April. The month of May was spent in the village line at Festubert with rest periods at Le Touret or Chocques. In June the battalion was in the village line or front line at Cuinchy and Ferme du Bois with rest periods at Le Quesnay. On 30th June the battalion attacked the enemy at Ferme du Bois near Richebourg l'Avoué and suffered heavy casualties.

July was spent in village trenches at Annequin and the front line trenches near Cuinchy with billets at Festubert and Le Hamel. On 6th August the battalion took over the village line at Givenchy. Between 14th and 22nd August training took place in Monchy-Breton following which the battalion moved to Englebelmer and reconstructed the front line in front of Hamel amid continual enemy shelling.

On 3rd September the battalion successfully attacked the enemy's position near the River Ancre but were unable to hold the position. They returned to Englebelmer for a period of training until 10th September when they took over the front line at Auchonvillers. After a break in billets at Beausart they went into the trenches at Redan where they were heavily shelled.

They remained in the Auchonvillers area in October and moved to the Schwaben Redoubt on 15th where a heavy enemy barrage caused many casualties. On 17th October the enemy began a particularly heavy bombardment of the Redoubt with 28 inch shells. The casualty figures were 5 officers and 156 other ranks. Harry Howard, aged 28, was one of those killed in action. Harry is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 7C

Private 8/11942 Thomas Hudson

 

8th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 16th May 1916,  Aged 21.

Buried Bienvillers Military Cemetery, I. A. 89.

 

Thomas Hudson was born in Loughborough in 1894 and registered at birth as 'Tom Hudson'. He was the son of Thomas Hudson, an engine fitter in the hosiery business, and his wife Fanny Hudson (née Hunt) who were married in Loughborough in 1893.

Tom had one younger brother George and three younger sisters Elizabeth, Doris and Nellie. In 1901 the family lived at 50 Cobden Street, Loughborough, but by 1911 they had moved to 20 Queen's Road. In 1911 Tom was an assistant in Hurst's boot shop, Church Gate.

Tom enlisted at Loughborough in 1914 as 'Thomas Hudson' and joined the 8th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 11942. He was initially sent to Aldershot for training and then to Shorncliffe in Kent at the end of February 1915. In April 1915 Tom's battalion became part of the newly established 37th Division of the Second New Army and the Division began to concentrate on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the units were inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July 1915 the Division began to cross the English Channel and Tom travelled to France on 29th July 1915. The 8th Battalion then moved via Watten, Houlle, St. Omer, Eecke and Dranoutre to Wulverghem and Berles-au-Bois, a short distance from the front line. In the months that followed the 8th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 6th Leicesters who relieved them.

In April 1916 the 8th Leicesters moved to the Doullens area for six weeks for cleaning up, resting and training. In mid-May the 8th Leicesters returned once more to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont sector. It was here that Tom was killed in action by the explosion of an enemy trench mortar bomb on 16th May 1916, aged 21. He is buried at Bienvillers Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, Grave I. A. 89. The same bomb also caused the death of Tom's friend and comrade, Private Albert Wilkinson of Chapman Street, from the Empress Works. Tom and Albert were buried in adjacent graves.

At the time Tom died his younger brother George was in the King George Military Hospital, Stamford Street, London. He was recovering from wounds in the head caused by shrapnel (sustained three months previously) and was not immediately told of his brother's death. George survived the war.

Corporal 46699 Frank Hueck

 

8th Bn, Northumberland Fusiliers.

Formerly 12058 Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 19th June 1917, Aged 19.

Buried Bailleul Communal Cemetery III. D. 66.

 

Frank Hueck was born in Burton on Trent, Staffordshire, on 15th August 1897 and baptised at St. Paul's Church, Burton on Trent on 11th July 1898. He was the son of Jean (or John) Baptiste Hueck (or Heuck, or Husek, or Hughes) and his partner Jane Coates. Evidence suggests that Frank's father Jean Baptiste Hueck was born in Charlotte Amalie, St. Thomas, Virgin Islands, and that he was the son of Charles Hueck, an unmarried cigar maker of Dutch origin, and Janey Bagagoine, a former black slave. Frank's parents had met when his father, who had come to England, was lodging at Mount Pleasant Inn, Canal Side, Burton on Trent. Jane Coates was the publican's stepdaughter.

Frank had three brothers John William, Albert and Edwin and three sisters Jane, Annie and Margaret. Jean Baptise Hueck was a builders' labourer and the Hueck family moved around from Burton on Trent, to London and to Loughborough. In 1891 they lived at 5 Greenclose Lane, Loughborough, in 1901 at 8 Hallam's Row, Albert Street, Horninglow, and by 1911 had returned to 5 Greenclose Lane. Frank became a member of the Emmanuel Church Lads Brigade.

Frank enlisted in Loughborough in August 1914 when he was 17 years old and joined the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 12058. He later transferred as Private 46699 to the 8th (Service) Battalion of the Northumberland Fusiliers and was subsequently promoted to Acting Corporal. His service records have not survived and his date of transfer and promotion are unknown but at the time he enlisted he was employed by the Nottingham Manufacturing Company Ltd. in Loughborough.

It is likely that Frank joined the Northumberland Fusiliers which was part of the Army's 11th (Northern) Division sometime after July 1916. In late July 1916 the 8th Battalion was centred at Flesselles, Somme and In August the battalion was doing trench tours in the area of Wailly, south-west of Arras. In the evening of 14th September they took part in the storming and capture of German trenches including the Wundt-Werk (Wonder Work). They were also in action at the Battle of Flers-Courcelette on 15th-22nd September, and the Battle of Thiepval Ridge on 26th-28th September. In the latter battle they suffered heavy casualties in operations at Zollern Redoubt and Stuff Redoubt on 27th September. At the end of September the battalion returned to trench tours in the area of Acheux. From January to March 1917 the Division was involved in the Operations on the Ancre and from 7th to 14th June in the Battle of Messines.

Frank was wounded in June 1917 while his battalion was holding the line near Bailleul. He was taken to No. 2 Casualty Clearing Station at Bailleul where he died of his wounds on 19th June 1917. He was only 19 years old. He was buried in Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension, Grave III. D. 66.

Frank is remembered on the memorial in Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, and on the Carillon. His name also appears on a bell in the Carillon, the gift of the Nottinghamshire Manufacturing Company Ltd, in memory of their employees lost in the war. Frank is also listed on the war memorial in St. Luke's Church, Parliament Street, Derby, possibly because his brother Albert lived in Derby. Albert Hueck served with the Leicestershire Regiment and survived the war.

Private 15774 William Caleb Hulin

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 6th October 1917,  Aged 34.

Commemorated Tyne Cot Memorial, panel 50 - 51.

 

William was the youngest son of Mr. S. J. Hulin, coachbuilder, High street Loughborough.

His Lieut. Writes - I am a poor hand at sympathy, but I can tell you one thing. Out yonder the regiment and myself have lost a splendid fellow. We are more companions than anything else. He was killed instantly by a bullet, which went just below the heart. Although I had to leave the line that night I gave strict instructions that he was to be properly buried. He was well loved by all the boys. He was unmarried, and joined up in 1914 in Kitchener's battalion, and had seen considerable active service. He held the position of secretary to the Station Hotel Bowling Club.

 

 

 

 William's Memorial Plaque.

Trooper 423 Walter Hutt

 

3rd Australian Light Horse

Died from an aneurysm of the aorta and cardiac failure 13th June 1915 at Base Hospital, St. Kilda Road, Melbourne, Australia.

Buried Coburg Pine Ridge Cemetery, Coburg, Victoria, Australia, Grave C.E.D. 442.

 

Walter Hutt (occasionally called Walter Hutt Perkins) was born on 21st September 1868 in Loughborough. He was brought up by his grandmother Elizabeth Hutt (née Collins) and her husband Thomas Hutt, a hosiery framework knitter of 29 Union Street, Loughborough. Walter's mother is likely to have been Elizabeth Hutt's own daughter Elizabeth, latterly of 4 Court B, Baxtergate, Loughborough. His grandmother, her husband and Walter's probable mother had all died by 1910.

Walter attested on 22nd November 1885 and joined the 3rd Leicestershire (Militia) Regiment, aged 17 years 2 months, as Private No. 956. At the time he was a hosiery worker for a Mr. Morley and was living at 29 Union St, Loughborough. He then served for a number of years with the 7th Hussars, in Secunderabad and Mhow, India.

On 20th August 1895 Walter made a declaration for the Civil Service as a Candidate for the position of Prison Officer and in the same year he married Fanny Wardle in Loughborough. Walter and Fanny went to live in Leicester where their children Walter, Doris, Arthur, Cecil and Dorothy were all born. In 1901 Walter was living with his family and was a gaoler.

In 1914 Walter was working as a prison gaoler in Tasmania and living at 46 Bathurst Street, Hobart. On 18th August 1914 he attested at Pontville, Tasmania, and was appointed as Private No. 423 in C Squadron of the Third Australian Light Horse Regiment. He stated that his wife lived at 9 Dover Street, Leicester, England and also that he had worked for 10 years in the Colonial Foreign Office and had served for 16 years with the 7th Hussars.

The Third Australian Light Horse C Squadron embarked from Hobart, Tasmania, on board HMAT A2 Geelong on 20th October 1914 for Egypt.

On 18th February 1915 at the 1st Australian General Hospital in Heliopolis Walter was diagnosed as having a heart problem. He said that he had first noticed something wrong when he was at Albany Encampment, Victoria, Australia, in 1913.

He was given two months leave and the Medical Board recommended that he be discharged from service. He left from Suez for Australia on the Ulysses on 22nd March 1915. On 13th June 1915 he died at the Base Hospital, St. Kilda Road, Melbourne from an aneurysm of the aorta and cardiac failure. Walter Hutt is commemorated on the Australian War Memorial at Canberra as well as on the Carillon.



Front row, second from the left - Walter Hutt serving with the 7th Hussars in India

Private 7121 Thomas Hutton

 

2nd Bn, Royal Scots.

Killed in Action 26th September 1917,  Aged 39.

Buried La Brique Military Cemetery no 2,  I. M. 29.

 

Thomas Hutton was born in Quorn in 1881, the son of James Hutton and his wife Emma (née Scotney) who were married in Quorn in 1877. He was baptised on 20th April 1888 at St. Bartholomew's Church, Quorn. Thomas's father was a carpenter and joiner and in 1891 the family lived in New Quorn, moving later to a cottage in Loughborough Road, Quorn. Thomas had one brother James and four sisters Clara, Eliza, Edith and Ethel. Two other brothers Albert and Harry and two other sisters Alice and Mary had died young.

Thomas enlisted with the Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) in 1900. He was sent as Private 7121 to join the 1st Battalion of the Regiment in South Africa for service in the 2nd Boer War and remained there until 1903. The battalion was placed in the 3rd Division under the command of Sir William Gatacre and much of the time was spent on mobile column work, patrolling and raiding expeditions rather than being engaged in any major battles. They provided support in the relief of Wepener in April 1900, cleared the enemy from Zwaggershoch in September 1900 and from the autumn of 1900 to the close of the war operated in the Eastern Transvaal, some doing garrison work around Balmoral and Middleburg and some companies trekking. Thomas was awarded the King's South Africa Medal.

In 1906 Thomas was transferred to the Army Reserve, became a brickyard labourer and came to live at 6 Park Row, Loughborough. On 3rd July 1909 he married Mary Ann Page (known as 'Polly') at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough. In 1911 Thomas and Polly were living with Polly's parents at 120 Belvoir Road, Coalville. With them was Polly's son Thomas Charles who was born in March 1909 not long before Thomas and Polly were married and whose father has never been disclosed. They subsequently moved to 19 Chapel Terrace, Southfield Road, Loughborough.

When war broke out in 1914 Thomas, as a Reservist, was recalled. Posted to the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Scots he was sent to France with a batch of reinforcements on 7th September 1914 and joined the battalion at Chauffry on the advance towards the River Aisne. Having crossed the river but unable to penetrate the German defensive position on the heights and after suffering from much German artillery fire the battalion withdrew back across the Aisne on 25th September and marched to Courcelles.

In early October 1914 the battalion was moved to Cornet Malo, north of Béthune, with orders to advance north-east to secure the Pont du Hem - Neuve Chapelle road. Following action in the Battles of La Bassée and Messines the battalion moved into reserve at Aubers and La Pluiche. Trench tours in the area of Chapigny-Fauquissart road ensued. In early November the battalion was in support near Le Tournay and Richebourg St. Vaast and in the front line trenches at Neuve Chapelle with breaks at La Couture and Bailleul. After a move to Neuve Eglise in mid-November the battalion was in the trenches at Messines and Wulverghem before moving to Westoutre and then Locre. From the trenches at Kemmel the battalion attacked the enemy on 14th December incurring more than a few casualties.

1915 began with training at Scherpenberg followed by trench tours at Kemmel, Wyschaete, and Vierstraat with breaks at La Clytte until 12th May, The battalion next moved to trenches north of Hill 60 in the Zillebeke sector. On 16th June the battalion was in action at the 1st Battle of Bellewaarde before moving to bivouac near Poperinghe for several weeks training. On 12th July they were ordered to take over trenches south of Hooge where they remained, apart from one break at Brandhoek, until 7th August. The remainder of August and first part of September were spent at Dickenbusch resting, route marching and practising attacks. On 12th September the battalion returned to the trenches at Hooge before a break at huts on the Ouderdom road. By 24th September the battalion was in the trenches at Sanctuary Wood and took part in an attack on 25th September in which casualties were very high. A further attempt to drive the enemy out of the Salient was made on 30th September. Trench tours in the Sanctuary Wood area continued until 23rd October when the battalion moved to Steenvoorde for rest, parades and sporting activities.

From 29th November 1915 to 5th February 1916 the battalion did trench tours at St. Eloi, with breaks at Reninghelst camp, after which they moved via Bayenghem and Poperinghe to Dickenbusch. From 27th March to 16th April they took part in the actions of the Bluff and St. Eloi Craters, where large explosive charges were blown under the German defences. May included trench tours at Vierstraat. On 21st June they left the Ypres Salient, entraining at Hopoutre for Moulle in the Pas de Calais. After instruction at Moulle they entrained at Wizernes for Candas, Somme, on 1st July and marched to billets in Berneuil.

Over the summer and autumn of the Somme Offensive they were in action at the Battles of Albert, Bazentin (where they helped to capture Longueval), Delville Wood and the Ancre (where they met stiff resistance). At the end of August the battalion moved by train and march to Mazingarbe and the trenches in the Hulluch sector to hold the line near the Hohenzollern Redoubt. After training in Coyecque at the end of September they moved again to Acheux for further instruction and working parties until 18th October. A further move for trench tours in the Serre sector took place on 23rd October, where they were heavily shelled, with breaks at Vauchelles.

On 29th November 1916 until 28th January 1917 the battalion did trench tours at Hébuterne, with rest and training at Berteaucourt. Training continued at La Thieuloye until 9th February, followed by trench digging at Beaufort and Liencourt and working parties at Arras, with breaks at Magnicourt and Liencourt, until 4th April. In April the battalion was in action in three battles of the Arras Offensive - the 1st and 2nd Battles of the Scarpe and the Battle of Arleux, after which there was a short period when they provided working parties at Tilloy. Much of May was spent in training at Izel-lès-Hameau prior to a return to the trenches at Arras and Monchy for repair work, followed by instruction at Estrée-Wamin in June. By 1st July the battalion had moved to the Louverval sector for trench tours, with breaks at a camp near Vélu, north-west of Haplincourt. On 28th August the battalion transferred to huts in the area of Ytres-Léchelle for attack practice and tactical exercises and on 19th September marched via Proven to a camp near Poperinghe. Having transferred to a camp south of Ypres on 23rd September the battalion went into the support line trenches on either side of the Ypres-Zonnebeke road.

On 26th September 1917 the Battle of Polygon Wood (a phase in the 3rd Battle of Ypres or Passchendaele) began. Thomas, aged 39, was killed in this action. He was buried in La Brique Military Cemetery No. 2, St. Jean-Les-Ypres, Grave I. M. 29. Thomas is commemorated on the Carillon Memorial in Loughborough and on two war memorials in Quorn (the War Memorial at The Cross and the memorial at St. Bartholomew's Church) near where members of his mother's family lived.

Thomas's brother James who served with the Royal Field Artillery was killed in action only ten days after Thomas and is remembered on the Tyne Cot Memorial. Thomas's widow Polly was remarried to William Mellors in 1920 in Loughborough and she and William had a daughter Violet that same year.