Surnames M - N

 

Private 15632 Alexander MacIntosh

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in action 30th January 1916, Aged 22.

Buried Bienvillers Military Cemetery, I. A. 84. 

 

Alexander MacIntosh was born in Christchurch, Hampshire, in 1892, the son of James MacIntosh, a Scot from Ross-shire, and his Welsh wife Helen (née Tedstone) who were married in Downton, Wiltshire in 1889. Alexander had a younger brother Alfred and a younger sister Honor. Alexander's father was slightly deaf and earned his living as a gardener. In 1901 the family lived at Hordle, Hampshire, but by 1911 they had moved to Careys in Brockenhurst. Between 1911 and 1913 Alexander must have left home for Loughborough as on 7th January 1914 he married a Loughborough girl, Alice May Pidcock, at Loughborough Register Office and at the time of his marriage he was an ironmonger's assistant for Clemersons Ltd. He was also 'an energetic and much esteemed worker in connection with the Loughborough Adult School' and a member of the Baptist Church. His parents later moved to The Gardens, Wainsford, near Lymington, Hampshire, while his wife remained in Loughborough at 22 Wharncliffe Road.

Alexander enlisted on 10th October 1914 at Leicester and was posted as Private 15632 to the 7th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment. He had previously served with the Hampshire Territorials and was sent to Aldershot for further training. In April 1915 his battalion was moved to Cholderton on Salisbury Plain, and on 25th June they were inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 29th July 1915 they received orders to proceed to France. Although Alexander had been appointed a Lance Corporal on 5th March 1915 he was unfortunately deprived of his 'Lance stripe' in the field on 15th September - the reason for this remains unrecorded.

Alexander was involved in various trench warfare activities on the Western Front in the Arras area for the remainder of 1915. On 30th January 1916 the battalion had just relieved the 9th Leicesters in the trenches at Bienvillers-au-Bois to work on support lines and communications. It was a very foggy day and the German parapet could only be seen from the salient. At 'stand-to' in the evening a man was found to be missing. A patrol of four men, including Alexander who like the other three men had nobly volunteered to look for their comrade together with an N.C.O. went out to search for the missing man at about 6.00pm. About three- quarters of the way across to the German wire a very large German patrol was encountered. The Germans opened fire and the 7th Leicesters patrol retreated, but before they had gone far Alexander was shot through the heart.

Alexander was 22 when he was killed in action. He was buried in Bienvillers Military Cemetery, Grave I.A.84. His widow, Alice, was married again, in Loughborough, in 1922, to Edward Lester.

Private G/15091 Alfred Manley

 

12th Bn, Royal Sussex Regiment.

Killed in action 21st October 1916, Aged 37.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial, pier & face 7 C. 

 

Alfred Manley was born in Borrowash, Derbyshire, in 1879, the son of Alfred Manley and Elizabeth Jane Manley (née Wall). Alfred Junior's parents were married at All Saints' Church, Ockbrook, Derbyshire, on 29th June 1874. Alfred's father was a general labourer and in 1881 his mother was a cotton factory operative. Alfred Junior had six brothers Joseph, George, Edward, Edwin, Robert and Walter and four sisters Annie, Agnes, Lavinia and Violet. In 1881 Alfred's parents were living in Turnpike Road, Borrowash, with young George and Edwin while Alfred Junior and his siblings Joseph and Annie were with their grandparents Joseph and Hannah Wall in Chapel Row, Nottingham Road, Borrowash. By 1891 the children were all back with their parents at No.14 Chapel Row, Borrowash.

In 1899 Alfred Junior, who had become a general labourer like his father, married Elizabeth Agnes Brooks in Loughborough and the couple set up home at 3 Court C, 9 Pinfold Gate. By 1911 Alfred Junior had become a theatre carpenter and lived with his wife and family at 13 Rectory Place, Loughborough. They now had four children Alfred, Annie, Elizabeth and Violet Kate (known as 'Kitty'). Kitty, however, sadly died between April and June 1911. Another son John born in early 1915 died a few months later.

Alfred Junior's service papers have not survived and it is therefore impossible to establish when he enlisted with the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 4676. At some point he transferred to the 12th (Service) Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment (2nd South Down) as Private G/15091 but again the date of transfer is unknown. It is possible, however, that he was sent to France in March 1916 when the 39th Division of the Army received substantial reinforcements which included the 12th Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment. Alternatively he may have joined the 12th Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment in France on 24th July 1916 or 4th or 12th September 1916 when the battalion received drafts of extra men. One detail is certain -Alfred was not in France before 1916 as he was not awarded the 1914/15 Star Medal.

In March 1916 the 12th Battalion of the Royal Sussex Regiment, having landed at Le Havre, joined its Army division which was concentrating at Blaringhem. The battalion then moved via Morbecque, Estaires, Fleurbaix, La Gorgue, Caudescure and Riez- du-Vinage to the Givenchy sector where it went into the front line from 15th -30th April. The month of May was spent in the village line at Festubert with rest periods at Le Touret or Chocques. In June the battalion was in the village line or front line at Cuinchy and Ferme du Bois with rest periods at Le Quesnay. On 30th June the battalion attacked the enemy at Ferme du Bois near Richebourg l'Avoué and suffered heavy casualties.

July was spent in village trenches at Annequin and the front line trenches near Cuinchy with billets at Festubert and Le Hamel. On 6th August the battalion took over the village line at Givenchy. Between 14th and 22nd August training took place in Monchy-Breton following which the battalion moved to Englebelmer and reconstructed the front line in front of Hamel amid continual enemy shelling.

On 3rd September the battalion successfully attacked the enemy's position near the River Ancre but were unable to hold the position. They returned to Englebelmer for a period of training until 10th September when they took over the front line at Auchonvillers. After a break in billets at Beausart they went into the trenches at Redan where they were heavily shelled.

They remained in the Auchonvillers area in October and moved to the Schwaben Redoubt on 15th where a heavy enemy barrage caused many casualties. On 17th October the enemy began a particularly heavy bombardment of the Redoubt with 28 inch shells. The casualty figures were 5 officers and 156 other ranks. October the battalion was in billets at Aveluy. On 21st October 1916 the battalion marched to the Schwaben Redoubt to take part in an attack on the enemy and Alfred, aged 37, was killed in action. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 7C, on the memorial at All Saints' Church, Ockbrook, on the war memorial in Victoria Avenue, Ockbrook, on the memorial at All Saints' Church, Loughborough, and on the Carillon.




Memorial All Saints' Church, Ockbrook

Corporal 235365 Horace Manley

 

8th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Formerly 255764 Leicestershire Yeomanry.

Killed in action 27th May 1918,  Aged 24.

Commemorated Soissons Memorial, Aisne.

 

Horace was the son of Mrs Hoult of Southfield Road Loughborough, Husband of Mary E. Manley of 103 Haddenham Road, Leicester.

Sergeant 2147 Reginald Frank Manning

 

5th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died at Home 6th January 1919,  Aged 20.

Buried Loughborough  Cemetery, 6-257

(his brother William Manning  also fell see below) 

Reginald was the son of William & Beatrice Manning of 24 Clarence Street, Loughborough.

MILITARY FUNERAL

Military honours accompanied the funeral of Sergeant Reginald Frank Manning, of the Leicestershire Regiment, a firing party attending and the "Last Post" being sounded at the close of the service at the Loughborough Cemetery. Deceased was 20 years old, and was the youngest son of Mr. W. Manning, of 24 Clarence Street who has now lost two sons through the war, his eldest son having died in France last August. Two other sons joined the Army, one of who has been discharged and the other is with the Coldstream guards on the Rhine.

Private 204287 William Manning

 

9th Bn, Norfolk  Regiment.

Died of Wounds 9th August 1918, Aged 27.

Buried Esquelbecq  Military Cemetery, II. F. 4. 

(his brother Reginald Manning  also fell see above) 

William was the son of William & Beatrice Manning of 24 Clarence Street, Loughborough.

 

Corporal 1229 Edward Manton

 

1/5th Bn, Leicestershire  Regiment.

Died of Wounds 26th March 1916, Aged 23.

Buried Aubigny Communal Cemetery, I. A. 10. 

 

Edward Manton was born in 1893 in Loughborough, the only son of Richard Manton and Emma Manton (née Spray) who were married in Loughborough in 1892. Edward's father, who originally came from Holbeach, Lincolnshire, was a hot water fitter. Edward had five sisters: Harriett, Lucy, Florence, Edith and Sarah. In 1901 the family lived at 25 Old King Street, Loughborough but by 1911 had moved to 95 Station Street and by then Emma Manton's widowed father had joined the household.

Edward, who in 1911 was an iron moulder's apprentice at the Empress Works, Loughborough, enlisted at Loughborough with the 1/5th Leicestershire Regiment (Territorials) on 21st November in that year. As Private 1229 he underwent training at Aberystwyth. When war broke out in 1914 Edward's battalion was mobilised as part of the North Midland Division, Lincoln and Leicester Brigade. The battalion moved to Luton for further training in marching and night work and by November 1914 was based in Bishops Stortford. On 25th February 1915 they were ordered to entrain at Harlow for Southampton and sailed for France the following day in very rough seas.

Having landed at Le Havre the battalion travelled by train via Rouen, Abbeville and St. Omer to Arneke where they detrained for Hardifort. The battalion was then held in reserve for, but did not take part in the Battle of Neuve Chapelle. For the whole of April 1915 they were in trenches near Wulverghem and subjected to continual sniping by the enemy before being moved to Zillebeke in the Ypres Salient, followed by a tour in the area of Mount Kemmel. Edward was promoted to an unpaid Lance Corporal on 8th August 1915.

At the beginning of October 1915 the 1/5th Leicesters were ordered to move towards Loos. On 13th October during the attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt, part of the final stages of the Battle of Loos, they went 'over the top' just after midday and came under intense machine gun fire. After the Battle of Loos, which Edward was fortunate to have survived, he went into the trenches between Festubert and Neuve Chapelle and in mid-December moved to the area between Haverskerque and Thiennes. On 4th December Edward was promoted to Corporal.

In early January 1916 the Battalion was sent to Marseilles to await transport to Egypt. They had only just embarked on H.M.T. Andania when orders came that they were to disembark and travel back to the Somme area of Picardy. In mid-February orders came for the battalion to take over the line north of the River Ancre opposite Beaumont Hamel. On 29th February the battalion moved to the area of Doullens where the men worked on improving the trenches despite being subjected to a considerable bombardment from the enemy with mines and craters being blown.

On 24th March 1916 Edward, wounded and suffering from concussion, was admitted to the 1st North Midlands Field Ambulance, from where he was transferred to No. 30 Casualty Clearing Station at Gezaincourt and admitted to hospital. He died on 26th March, aged 23, and is buried in Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension, north-west of Arras, Grave 1.A.10.

 

Private 15465  Edward Revell Marriott

 

6th Bn, Leicestershire  Regiment.

Killed in Action 16th March 1916,  Aged 24.

Buried Bienvillers Military Cemetery, I. A. 91. 

 

Edward Revell Marriott was born in 1892 in Loughborough, the son of Charles Samuel Marriott and Jane Elizabeth Marriott (née Clarkson). His parents were married in Loughborough in 1881 and his father was an ironmonger and coal dealer. Edward had one older brother Charles Ernest and three sisters Mabel, Evelyn and Ellen. Until 1901 the family lived at 1 Dead Lane, Loughborough, but by 1911 had moved to Churchgate and Edward was now assisting his father in the business. Edward's mother Jane died at the end of 1911.

Edward enlisted at Loughborough on 23rd September 1914. He was almost 23 years old and now a motor lorry driver. He was sent to the Leicestershire Regiment Depot and a month later was posted to the 6th (Service) Battalion which was attached to the 9th (Scottish) Division of the Army. The troops trained in Bordon, Hampshire, and gradually arms and equipment were obtained. In April 1915 they were transferred to the Army's 37th Division at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain and shortly afterwards judged to be ready for war. King George V inspected the Division at Sidbury Hill on 25th June.

Edward's battalion entered France on 29th July 1915 and joined the rest of the 37th Division which was concentrating at Tilques, near St. Omer in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais. In September the battalion was in Berles-au-Bois, south-west of Arras. The battalion remained in the Amiens/Doullens area for the following six months and were engaged in localised operations seeking a tactical advantage. Edward was killed near Bienvillers on 16th March 1916, aged 24. He is buried in Bienvillers Military Cemetery, Grave I.A.91.

Edward is remembered on the All Saints with Holy Trinity Memorial, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon.

 

Private 1027387 Henry Marriott

 

3rd Bn, Canadian Infantry (Central Ontario Regt.)

Killed in Action 30th August 1918,  Aged 42.

Buried Valley Cemetery Vis-En Artois,  A. 10. 

 

Henry was the son of John & Hannah Marriott of Loughborough, Husband of Emma Marriott of Campbellford Ontario.

 

Private 8882 Joseph Marriott

 

1st Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 27th October 1915, Aged 24.

Buried Potijze Burial Ground, Ypres, EI. 2. 

 

Joseph Marriott, known as 'Joe', was born in Whitwick, Leicestershire in 1891, the son of James Walter Marriott and Emma Elizabeth Marriott (née Bowley and sometimes known as Emmeline) who were married in Loughborough in 1885. Joe was one of ten children in the family, but two died young. He had one surviving brother George and six surviving sisters Theresa, Alice, Winifred, Jane Ann, Mary and Eva. By 1901 the family had moved from Whitwick to Forest Street, Shepshed. In 1911 they were still in Shepshed, but at Mary's Place, Charnwood Road. They later moved to 17 Falcon Street, Loughborough. Joe's father was an agricultural labourer.

Joe attested at Leicester on 3rd March 1910 and joined the 1st Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 8882. In August 1911 he was sentenced to 42 days detention 'for stealing goods belonging to a Regiment'. At the end of November 1911 he was moved to the 2nd Battalion and sent to India on the SS Dongola. He remained in India until 19th September 1914 and was stationed in Bareilly, Madras, Delhi and Ranikhet. Between 1910 and 1914 he was hospitalised seven times suffering variously from scabies, gonorrhoea, and dengue fever.

In August 1914 Joe's battalion was in Ranikhet with the Indian Corps (Gharwal Brigade) in the Meerut Division and was ordered to proceed to France. The troops arrived at Marseilles on 12th October 1914. Having travelled north, Joe went into the trenches at Calonne, near Bethune in the Pas-de-Calais, on 28th October. In mid-November Joe became ill with dysentery, was transferred to a hospital ship and brought home. He returned to France to join the 1st Battalion at Armentières on 19th May 1915 and went into the trenches at Rue du Bois, Fleurbaix, on 20th May. A few days later, however, he was again admitted to hospital. He convalesced at Le Havre and rejoined his battalion near Ypres where the men were often subjected to shelling, whizz-bangs and gas attacks. On 19th, 20th and 31st July they fought in the action at Hooge and were part of the first division to be attacked by flamethrowers or 'liquid fire'. The British retook Hooge on 9th August. From mid-August, and during September and October Joe's battalion was variously in the Weltje Line, at Vlamertinghe, at the Ypres-Yser Canal Bank, 'Frascati' (Ypres), La Brique (NE of Ypres), Morteledge Farm near Ypres and in the Potije Line. Joe was killed in action on the Potije Line on 27th October 1915, aged 24, and was buried at Potijze Burial Ground, near Ypres, Grave El.2.

 

Private 10183 Thomas Marshall

 

6th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 8th October 1915,  Aged 20.

Buried Berles-Au-Bois Churchyard Extension, S.11. 

 

 

Thomas Marshall, known as 'Tom', was born at 60 Woodgate, Loughborough in 1894. He was the son of Albert Marshall, a boiler maker, and his wife Sarah Ann Marshall (née Gould) a runner in a hosiery factory, who were married in Loughborough in 1889. Tom was one of eleven children in the Marshall family, but only five of his siblings survived, like him, to adulthood: Ethel, Florence, Edith, Alice and Albert. By 1911 the family had moved from Woodgate to 4 Albert Place, Loughborough.

When war broke out Tom was a boiler riveter and aged almost twenty. He enlisted at Loughborough on 15th August 1914 and joined the 6th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 10183. This Battalion was attached as army troops to the 9th (Scottish) Division of the Army. Initial training was at Salisbury in August 1914, and continued at Bordon, Hampshire, from September 1914. In April 1915 the battalion was transferred to the 37th Division of the Army at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain and by the end of May was considered to be ready to join the British Expeditionary Force in France. On 25th June the 37th Division was inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill and on 28th July Tom embarked for France. By 2nd August Tom was near Tilques.

Tom was killed near Berles-au-Bois, Pas de Calais, on 8th October 1915, aged 20.
 

The War Diary records, '6.15pm Battalion relieved in the trenches by 8th Bn. Leicestershire Regt. and returned to billets at Berles au Bois for the night 8/9th Oct. casualties 8th Oct. 1 man killed, Lt. M. C. Hill wounded in knee by rifle bullet late in the evening.'

The Loughborough Echo reported:

'News has been received from the front of the death whilst in action of Private Tom Marshall, 6th Leicesters and Private J. Ireland, 2nd Leicesters, both Loughborough lads and associated with the Church Lads Brigade'.

Tom's medals and ID disc are displayed in the Carillon War Memorial Museum.

 

Thomas's medals and ID Disc are displayed in the Carillon War Memorial Museum.

 

Major William Francis Martin

 

C, Squadron Leicestershire Yeomanry.

Killed in Action 13th May 1915, Aged 39.                                                         

Buried Oosttaverne Wood Cemetery VI. H. 23.

 

William Francis Martin was the younger son of Robert Frewen Martin JP, a prominent local engineer and the managing partner of the nearby Mountsorrel granite quarry, and Henrietta Susan Martin of The Brand, Woodhouse, Leicestershire. William was born in 1876 at Whitehaven, Cumberland, and educated at Harrow and Trinity College, Cambridge. He joined the Leicestershire Yeomanry in 1897 and was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in September 1898. He served in South Africa with the 7th Company of the Imperial Yeomanry in the Second Boer War, receiving the Queen's Medal with four clasps. In July 1901 he was made Honorary Lieutenant, in 1904 a Captain, and in 1911 became a Major in command of C (Loughborough) Squadron. He, with his whole regiment, undertook Imperial Service obligations on the outbreak of the First World War, and he was mentioned in Sir John French's despatches.

Major Martin was killed at the Battle of Frezenberg. Killed in the same trench as Major Martin were Major Leibert, Lt. Brooks, Troopers Hickling and Adams and Sgt. Burton.

Major Martin is also commemorated on the Woodhouse Eaves War Memorial.

Major Martin was a Director of the Mountsorrel Granite Company, his father having died in 1912, and he took an active part in public life in Leicestershire. He was also a member of the Cavalry Club and enjoyed hunting and shooting. He married Violet Anne Philippa, elder daughter of Colonel Walter Wynter of Woodhouse Eaves, Leicestershire, on 13th June 1912 and the couple lived at The Holt, Woodhouse. Besides his widow he left a son Robert Andrew St. George Martin (born 1914) and a daughter Diana Violet Anne (born 1913).

Major Martin's older brother, Lieutenant Colonel Robert Edmund Martin, who was with the 1/4th Leicestershire Regiment, was wounded twelve days after his brother was killed but survived the war and in 1925 married the widow of Captain Lawrence Peel. Both brothers were Freemen of the City of Leicester.

Major W. F. Martin is seen here leading off C, Squadron,
in the Market Place Loughborough, on mobilization in 1914.

Private 15905 John William Mason

 

Depot, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died at Home of Wounds 4th February 1916,  Aged 25.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery 11/312

 

John William Mason was born in Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, in 1891. He was the son of John Henry Mason and Clara Mason (née Smith). His parents were married in Loughborough in 1888. John had three brothers Albert, Thomas and Herbert and three sisters Ivy, Edith and Mabel. In 1901 the family lived at 55 Ashby Square, Loughborough and John William's father was a hosiery trimmer at a dye works. By 1911 the family had moved to 23 Granville Street and John William worked as a fitter's labourer.

John William enlisted on 9th November 1914 and was posted as Private 15905 to the 10th Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment. Eight days later he was reposted to the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion which was in training at Portsmouth. He remained with the 3rd Battalion until 8th April 1915 when he was posted to join the 1st Battalion of the Leicesters and sent to France. He joined the 1st Battalion which was in Divisional Reserve in billets at Armentières, not far from Lille and went into the trenches at Rue du Bois, Fleurbaix. At the end of April the battalion marched to Bailleul, where the men were inspected by Mr. Asquith. They then marched to Poperinghe and went into trenches in the Wieltje-Ypres area. Here, for most of June and July, they were often subjected to shelling, whizz-bangs and gas attacks. On 16th July, just before the action at Hooge, John William received a gunshot wound to the neck. He was treated in France until 12th September when he was sent back to England. His wound unfortunately turned gangrenous and John William died at the 4th London General Hospital (King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, SE5) on 4th February 1916, aged 25.

John William is buried at Loughborough Cemetery, Grave 11/312. He is remembered on the Emmanuel Church War Memorial as well as on the Carillon.

Private 18600 George Harry Matthews

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 15th July 1916,  Aged 38.

Buried Heilly Station Cemetery II. B. 46. 

 

George Harry Matthews (or Mathews) was born in Loughborough in 1878, the son of Henry Matthews (or Mathews) and his wife Mary (née Willett) who were married in Loughborough in 1873. George's father Henry was a butcher and he had learnt his trade from his uncle William who was a master butcher with a shop at 34 Market Place, Loughborough. By 1875 Henry was a butcher in Church Gate and by 1887, the year before George was born, he had taken over his uncle William's premises in Market Place. Unfortunately George's father died on 22nd October 1881 but the business was subsequently run by George's mother Mary for many years. George had two sisters Mary Ellen and Annie Maria and as soon as he was old enough he assisted his mother in the butcher's shop. Away from the premises the family lived in School Street and Pinfold Gate at various times in the 1880s and 1890s. In 1901 George, his mother and sister Mary Ellen were living at 17 Rectory Road. By 1911 they were at 14 Cobden Street with the butcher's shop in Market Place still in the name of Mrs. Mary Matthews. George's mother retired by 1916 and died in Loughborough in 1922.

The exact date of George's enlistment is unknown but it seems likely to have been sometime in the spring of 1915 when the 7th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment, which George joined as Private 18600, became part of the 37th Division of the Army. George went to France on 5th November 1915 where his battalion was in the area of Berles-au-Bois, south-west of Arras. The battalion remained in this area around Bienvillers and Bailleulmont until April 1916 and was engaged in localised operations seeking a tactical advantage. When not in the trenches being subjected to enemy shelling the 7th Leicesters received intensive training in bombing, Lewis gunnery, visual signalling and a host of other activities. In April 1916 they were moved to the Doullens area and formed working parties to cut down trees and prepare brushwood for the front line as well as preparing the support trenches in the area. In May they worked on building a new railway line between Le Bret and Bienvillers-au-Bois. Towards the end of May the battalion returned to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont area.

At the beginning of July the 7th Battalion moved on to the Somme, leaving Bailleulmont for Souastre on 1st July. Between 4th and 9th July the battalion was held in reserve at Wallincourt, Talmas and Hangest-sur-Somme. On 10th July they left Hangest for Méricourt and went from there by bus to Méaulte. On the following day they relieved the 7th Battalion of the Yorkshire Regiment in the trenches where they were subjected to a slow enemy bombardment. On 13th July they were relieved and marched to Fricourt for a day's rest. On 14th July they were at Mametz Wood and in the attack on Bazentin Wood and Bazentin Le Petit. At some point during this period George was wounded. He died from his wounds on 15th July, aged 38.

George is buried at Heilly Station Cemetery Grave II.B.46. He is commemorated on the war memorial of Holy Trinity Church, Loughborough, and on the Carillon.

Private 11263 Robert Mayson

 

2nd Bn, Kings Own Scottish Borderers.

Killed in Action 16th September 1914,  Aged 21.

Commemorated La Ferte-Sous-Jouarre Memorial.

 

Robert, a needlemaker, was the son of Harry and Elizabeth Mayson of 19 Gladstone Avenue, Loughborough. He served with the British Expeditionary Force at the First Battle of Mons and the Battle of Le Cateau and was killed at the Battle of the Aisne. His battalion had successfully crossed the river and reached Missy-sur-Aisne in spite of the increased severity of the fighting. The Germans had entrenched themselves and for the next few days continued to pound the Allied trenches with heavy artillery. At some point between 13th and 16th September Robert Mayson was reported missing. The official notice stated that his death took place in Germany on or before 16th September and it would seem, therefore, that Robert was either killed in action or severely wounded and taken to a German Field Hospital where he died.

Robert had three brothers and four sisters. All his brothers enlisted who all, unlike Robert, survived the war. Harry served with the Lincolnshire Regiment, and Bertie and Lawrence, and his brother-in-law  Pte. J. Hopewell were all with the Leicestershire Regiment.

Private 15169 Bernard Albert Mee

 

9th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 17th October 1916,  Aged 22.

Buried Chocques Military Cemetery I. J. 118.  

(his brother Frederick Mee  also fell see below)  

Bernard Albert Mee, known as 'Albert' to his family and friends, was born in Loughborough in 1894. He was the son of Charles Mee, a machine turner, and his wife Ann Mee (née Stretton) who were married in Loughborough in 1873. In 1891 the Mee family lived at 17 Falcon Street, Loughborough and in 1901 in Ratcliffe Road. Albert had five brothers John, Charles, Ernest, Fred and Clarence and three sisters Sarah, Rosetta and Mary. Albert's mother died in 1909 and in 1911 Albert, who was an engineer at the Brush Works, and his brothers Fred and Clarence were living with their widowed father at 2 Canal Bank, Bridge Street, Loughborough. Albert later moved to 33 Ratcliffe Road.

Albert enlisted soon after war broke out and joined the 9th Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 15169. The 9th (Service) Battalion was raised at Leicester in September 1914 as part of Kitchener's Third New Army and joined 23rd Division as Divisional Troops. The units of the Division began to assemble at Bullswater and Frensham in Hampshire from September 1914 and the King, Queen and Princess Mary visited the fledgling Division on 29 September. In early December, as the weather worsened, the Division moved into Aldershot and then, at the end of February 1915, to Shorncliffe in Kent. In April 1915 Albert's battalion became part of the newly established 37th Division of Kitchener's 2nd New Army and the Division began to concentrate on Salisbury Plain. Albert was encamped on Perham Down.

On 29th July 1915 Albert was sent to France, travelling from Folkestone to Boulogne on the SS St. Seiriol.

Initially the 37th Division concentrated near Tilques. The 9th Battalion then moved via Watten, Houlie, St. Omer, Eecke and Dranoutre to Wulverghem and Bienvillers-au-Bois, a short distance from the front line. In the months that followed the 9th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 7th Leicesters who relieved them. They were Involved in operations in Bailleul, Le Bizet, Armentières, Mondicourt, Beauval and Berles-au-Bois. In April 1916 the 9th Leicesters moved to the Doullens area for six weeks for cleaning up, resting and training. In mid-May they returned once more to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont sector. In June there was a series of nightly excursions into No-Man's Land with patrols attempting to gather information on the enemy's dispositions. On other occasions there were working parties out repairing the British barbed wire entanglements. The situation became increasingly hazardous as the month wore on when the Germans began to use a new and more accurate type of trench mortar. At some point Albert was wounded in the leg, but he recovered and returned to his battalion.

On 1st July 1916 the 9th Leicesters moved into position at Souastre in readiness to reinforce the troops attacking at Gommecourt. No orders came, however, and the men marched back to Humbercamps. Training continued on the 4th and 5th July. On 6th and 7th July they marched via Talmas to Crouy and on 8th and 9th July they rested and were addressed by the Divisional Commander on the forthcoming battle. On 10th July they moved to Ailly-sur-Somme and then entrained for Méricourt before going by bus to bivouacs in Méaulte north-east of Amiens. They then took over as Quadrangle Trench and Quadrangle support. On 11th there was heavy shelling but no infantry attack. On 12th July the 9th battalion was relieved and moved back to Fricourt. On 14th July the battalion moved up to the south edge of Mametz Wood just as an intense bombardment of the German positions began, and on to Bazentin-Le-Petit Wood.

Finally relieved on 16th July the battalion, which had suffered heavy casualties, marched to Fricourt and on to Ribemont on the following day. On 18th July they entrained at Méricourt for Saleux. After nine days of marching and some motor lorry transit the battalion arrived at Arras on 27th July, where for all of August the battalion was in the trenches or resting in billets at Arras. After some days training and resting at the beginning of September the battalion marched to Frévent and entrained for 'Edgehill' station near Dernancourt. On 16th September the battalion moved to bivouac near Fricourt and after two days moved again to bivouac in front of Bernafay Wood.

On 24th September the battalion moved up to the assembly trenches in front of Gueudecourt in preparation for an attack on the following day and were heavily shelled in the process. From 25th to 28th September the battalion took part in the Battle of Morval and sustained considerable casualties - 12 officers and 274 ordinary ranks.

On 2nd October the battalion moved from Bernafay Wood to Bernancourt and on 4th October entrained at 'Edge Station' for Longpré-les-Corps-Saints and then marched to Francières. On 7th October they entrained at Pont Remy for Béthune and marched to Fouquières-lès-Béthune. On 10th October they marched to Sailly-la-Bourse and went into the support trenches in the Hohenzollern Sector where trench mortars from the enemy did considerable damage. Albert was wounded and died, aged 22, in No. 1 Casualty Clearing Station on 17th October.

The news of Albert's death came in a letter to his relatives from the Lieutenant of his company, who wrote that he was shot through the head while on sentry duty, and died a few hours afterwards without regaining consciousness. He was a competent Lewis gunner, and would be greatly missed. A letter of sympathy was also received from the chaplain.

Albert was buried in Chocques Military Cemetery, north-west of Béthune, Grave I. J. 118. His brother Fred who served with the Cheshire Regiment was killed in action in July 1916. His brother Charles who served with the 6th Worcestershire Regiment was severely wounded in 1914 and given a discharge. His brother Clarence lived in Rendell Street, Loughborough, but emigrated with his wife and daughter to the United States in 1928. His sister Mary (Mrs. Marriott) lived at 26 Cartwright Street, Loughborough.

Lance Corporal 7789 Charles Arthur Mee

 

2nd Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 14th March 1915,  Aged 26.

Buried Boulogne Eastern Cemetery III. C. 86. 

 

Brother of Mrs Houghton of 19 Falcon Street, Loughborough.

Private W/164 Frederick Arthur Mee

 

13th Bn, Cheshire Regiment.

Killed in Action 7th July 1916.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial, pier & face 3 C & 4 A. 

 (his brother Albert Mee  also fell see above)  

Frederick Arthur Mee, known as Fred to his family and friends, was born in Loughborough in 1891. He was the son of Charles Mee, a machine turner, and his wife Ann Mee (née Stretton) who were married in Loughborough in 1873. In 1891 the Mee family lived at 17 Falcon Street, Loughborough and in 1901 in Ratcliffe Road. Fred had five brothers John, Charles, Ernest, Bernard and Clarence and three sisters Sarah, Rosetta and Mary. Fred's mother died in 1909 and in 1911 Fred, who was now a brass moulder in a foundry, and his brothers Albert and Clarence were living with their widowed father at 2 Canal Bank, Bridge Street, Loughborough.

In 1912 Fred married Emma Oliver in Loughborough and the couple moved to Port Sunlight in the Wirral where Fred had obtained employment at Lever Brothers' soap factory. Fred and Emma soon had two children, Irene and Alfred.

On 1st September 1914 at a meeting convened by Gershom Stewart MP in the Gladstone Hall, Port Sunlight, 500 of Lever Brothers' employees volunteered to join up to what would become 13th (Service) Battalion of the Cheshire Regiment. By 7th September 700 employees had joined. All original members had W prefixes to their service numbers, and Fred became Private W/164. The 13th Battalion moved to Chester and joined 74th Brigade, 25th Division in Kitchener's Third New Army. The Division assembled in the area around Salisbury for training and the 13th Cheshires spent the winter in billets in Bournemouth. In May 1915 the Division moved to Aldershot for final instruction.

The Division proceeded to France on 25th September 1915 and concentrated in the area of Nieppe in the Lys Plain not far from Dunkerque. Their first action was in defence of the German attack on Vimy Ridge in May 1916. They then moved to the Somme and joined the Battle just after the main attack, with 75th Brigade making a costly attack near Thiepval on 3rd July 1916. On 5th July the 13th Cheshires marched from Bouzincourt to La Boiselle where they went into the trenches.

On 7th July 1916 the 13th Cheshires went over the top at La Boiselle into the attack at 8.05am in a square held three sides by the enemy. Zero hour was preceded by an intense half-hour bombardment which produced a heavy enemy reply. After suffering severe casualties the Cheshires reached their objective and consolidated and a number of prisoners and war material fell into their hands. Casualties on this day were very heavy, with 18 officers and 243 other ranks being killed. Fred Mee, aged 24, was one of those killed.

Fred is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 3C & 4A, and on the Lever Brothers War Memorial in Port Sunlight on the Wirral. His brother Albert who was with the 9th Leicestershire Regiment died of wounds in October 1916. His brother Charles William who served with the 6th Worcestershire Regiment was severely wounded in 1914 and given a discharge.

Fred's widow Emma was remarried in Port Sunlight in 1923 to Andrew G. King.




Memorial at Port Sunlight

Private 18112 George Walter Frederick Mee

 

10th Bn, Cameronians (Scottish Rifles).

Killed in Action 29th January 1916,  Aged 17.

Commemorated Loos  Memorial, panel 57 - 59.

 

George Walter Frederick Mee was born in Quorn on 27th February 1898. He was the son of Francis Henry Mee, a carpenter who later became a car finisher, and Elizabeth Mee (née Clarke) a machine hand. George's parents were married on Christmas Day 1889 in Loughborough. In 1901 the Mee family lived at 68 Pinfold Street, Loughborough but later moved to 23 Boyer Street. George had attended Desford Industrial School in Desford, Leicestershire and he is listed at Desford in 1911, aged 13, as a stoker and part-time schoolboy. In 1915 his family were at 55 Queen's Road, Loughborough. George had four brothers James, Fred, Jack and Frank, and three sisters Florence, Eva and Mary.

When George enlisted at Leicester on 21st February 1914 he said that he was almost 16 years old and a musician. He joined the 1st Rifle Brigade at Colchester two days later as boy soldier no. 5410. In February 1915 he was admitted to hospital in Winchester for just over two weeks with bronchitis. He was discharged on 12th March 1915 as his services 'were no longer required'.

He managed to reenlist with the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) by not giving his true age and using the alias 'George Walter Moor'. He was taken on as Private 18112 in the 10th (Service) Battalion and sent to Chisledon Camp on Salisbury Plain. He went to France in July 1915, aged just 17. George's battalion was sent from Boulogne via Audruicq, Nielles-lès-Ardres, Arques to Lozinghem where they practised bayonet fighting, route marching and trench procedure. During September 1915 they moved on to Verquin and then Mazingarbe near Loos-en-Gohelle. The battalion first saw action on 25th September 1915 at the Battle of Loos, where they made steady gains at Hill 70 but at the high cost of 255 of their soldiers being killed in action. George was wounded in the arm at Loos but was very keen to return to the front. When he rejoined the newly reinforced battalion the men were alternately in the front line trenches at Vermelles or resting at Sailly-Labourse.

Throughout January 1916 the battalion was holding a part of the front line in the area opposite the Hohenzollern Redoubt and subjected to shelling. George was killed in action on 29th January 1916, aged 17, and was the first Loughborough boy soldier to die in the war. In a letter to his parents, his company officer said: 'He was one of the most popular of the men in my company. He was always so bright and full of energy; one could not help liking him. I had the greatest confidence in his courage and intelligence'. The officer added that Mee was on patrol work when he was wounded by a bomb, and died very soon after. George is remembered on the Loos Memorial, Panel 57-59.

Private James William Mellors

 

6/7th Bn. Gordon Highlanders.

Died at Home 29th December 1921,  Aged 22.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery 20/210.

 

James lived at 15 Paget Street, Loughborough.

James William Mellors

Has no memorial on his grave.

Driver 232869 Morton Metcalfe

 

44th Res. Bty. 86th Bde. Royal Field Artillery.

Died of Wounds 30th May 1918,  Aged 26.

Buried Crouy british Cemetery II. E. 18. 

 

Morton was the elder son of Mr James & Mary Metcalfe of 11. The Avenue Loughborough.He died from wounds received in action the same day. News came from the chaplain that Metcalfe had been dangerously wounded in the head by shell splinter, and did not recover consciousness. Gunner Metcalfe who was 26 years old was married. He joined up a 1917 from the Brush Works, where he had been in the offices since leaving school. Of musical abilities he had acted as deputy organist at Emmanuel Church, and when he joined the army was acting organist and choirmaster at Barrow on soar Church. In his youth he had been a member of the St. Peters Church Lads' Brigade.      

Lance Sergeant 241216 Arthur Miller 

 

2/5th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 27th September 1917,  Aged 23.

Buried Dozinghem Military Cemetery V. E. 20. 

 

 

Arthur was the son of Mr. Henry & Mrs Harriett Miller 54 Ashby Rd, Loughborough; Mr Miller was the conductor of the Borough Band. Deceased, who was 23 years of age unmarried, joined up on the 3rdNovember 1914, at which time he was employed at Messrs, Clarke's dyeworks. He was well known as a member of the Borough Band, in which he played a silver baritone.

Sergeant 865 William Kilgour Miller

 

1/5th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died at Home 9th July 1916, Aged 57.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery, 14/298. 

 

William Kilgour Miller was born in 1859 in the parish of St. Cuthbert's Church, near Princes Street, Edinburgh. He was the son of John Miller, who later lived at 9 East Montgomery Place, Edinburgh, and attended the Presbyterian Church.

William had already served with 1st Battalion of the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders) for seven years when, on 22nd September 1883 at Ballincollig, County Cork, Ireland he attested to join the 2nd Dragoons of the Royal Scots Greys. He was 25 years old and had a tattoo of a Highlander and girl on his right arm, and on his left arm a tattoo of a shield. He secured his release from the Black Watch by a payment of £14 and joined the Royal Scots Greys in Ballincollig as Private 2512. He was appointed a Bandsman in the 2nd Dragoons on 1st July 1884, a position he held until 21st September 1890.

In November 1883 he was sent to Piershill Barracks in north-east Edinburgh where he stayed for two years until October 1885 when he moved to Aldershot. On 27th November 1886 he married Kate Harrington, a farmer's daughter, in Farnham, Surrey. In August 1887 he was posted to Brighton for eleven months. In July 1888 he was sent to Ireland, firstly to Dundalk and then, in July 1890, to the Curragh.

On 22nd September 1890 William transferred to Royal Scots Greys, 1st Class A Reserve, moved with his wife and two young sons James and William Kilgour Miller to Nottingham and joined the Nottingham City Police Force. He left the Army Reserve on 29th September 1895. His military papers record the following: 'Conduct very good. Habits regular and temperate' and that he had been awarded Royal Humane Society Medal for Saving of Life.

Between 1893 and 1901 five daughters were born to William and Kate Kilgour Miller: Kate, Annie, Edith, Laura and Florrie. In 1901 the family was living at 3 Baden Terrace, Nottingham, and William was a musician with the Robin Hoods (a unit of the Volunteer Force of the British Army).

Sometime between 1901 and 1909 the family moved to 88 Cobden Street, Loughborough as William had obtained employment as a fitter and electric furnace labourer at the Brush Electrical Engineering Company. On 16th April 1909 he attested at Loughborough, this time to join the 1/5th Leicestershire Regiment (Territorials) for four years. He was appointed Private 865 and was almost 50 years old. Between 1909 and 1911 he attended annual training camps at High Tor and Aberystwyth and was subsequently re-engaged in November 1912 and in February 1914. He played a clarinet in the band.

William went to France with the 1/5th Leicesters on 28th February 1915 but two weeks later was sent to No. 11 Stationery Hospital at Rouen with bronchitis. He was transferred back to England on 22nd March 1915.

William resumed military duties in Loughborough and was attached to the administrative centre of the battalion at the Loughborough Drill Hall. He was promoted to Acting Corporal on 1st May 1915 and to Acting Sergeant on 3rd July 1915. In March 1916, however, his health deteriorated and he was in Loughborough Hospital from 30th March to 11th April suffering from mitral stenosis. He died at home (44 Leicester Road, Loughborough) on 9th July 1916 from pleurisy and pneumonia, aged 57.

A local newspaper report on William's funeral recorded that it was 'conducted by the Rev. Pitts, and deceased was accorded military honours. In addition to the family mourners there were present: Capt. Woods, Lieut. Harrison, Observation Posts, and men from the Drill Hall. At the conclusion of the service three volleys were fired over the open grave by a firing party from Glen Parva, and the bugler sounded the Last Post'.

William is buried in Loughborough Cemetery Grave 14/298. He is remembered on the memorial in All Saints Church, Loughborough as well as on the Carillon.

William's sons both had Army careers and served in WW1, James with the 2nd Dragoons of the Royal Scots Greys and William with the 1st Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters. Both survived the war. Two of William's grandchildren James Acquilla Kilgour Miller and John William Kilgour Miller served in the Royal Navy in the Second World War and both lost their lives [See Loughborough WW2 Roll of Honour ].

Driver 820657 George Henry Mills

 

46th Div. Ammunition Col., Royal Field Artillery.

Previously served as No. 399 Royal Field Artillery (T.F.)

Died of Wounds 29th May 1917,  Aged 20.

Buried Bully-Grenay Communal Cemetery II. G. 10. 

 

George Henry Mills was born in Loughborough in late 1896 or early 1897. He was the eldest son of George Mills and his wife Hannah Maria (née Glasse) who were married at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, on 10th November 1894. At the time of his marriage George Mills was a groom, but he later became a cab driver. George Henry had three brothers Wilfred, Harold and Eric and two sisters Lily and Mabel. In 1901 the Mills family lived at 1 Moor Lane, Loughborough, but they later moved to 80 Wellington Street. In 1911 George Henry, aged 14, was an iron turner at Cotton's hosiery machine works in Pinfold Gate.

George Henry's service papers have not survived but it is known that he was mobilised with the local Territorials at the outbreak of war. Initially having been given the service number of 399 he joined the Royal Field Artillery as Driver 820657. He was part of the 46th (North Midland) Divisional Ammunition Column and was sent to France on 5th March 1915. At some point, probably in 1916, he became a gunner attached to a trench mortar battery in the 46th Division.

During the Battle of Loos the 46th Division was decimated in an attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt on 13th October 1915. It was later involved in the Battle of the Somme in July 1916, where in the opening phase as part of VII Corps, the southern-most corps of the British Third Army, the Division took part in the diversionary attack at Gommecourt on the first day on the Somme, 1st July 1916. This was a catastrophic failure resulting in heavy losses. The event dogged the division afterwards with a poor reputation until 29th September 1918.

George Henry, having survived the war for over two years, died of wounds aged 20, on 29th May 1917. He was buried in Bully-Grenay Communal Cemetery, Grave II. G. 10.

His parents, who in 1917 lived at 80 Moor Lane, received a letter from a lieutenant as follows: 'I regret to have to inform you of the death in action of your son, Gunner G. H. Mills. He was going up to the guns, during an attempted enemy raid when a shell, which burst a few yards from him, mortally wounded him. Everything possible was done, but he died about ten minutes later. I can assure you that you have the sincere sympathy of the whole battery in your sad loss. He was one of the best men in the battery, popular with the officers and with his companions, and his loss is a blow to all of us. I trust that it is some consolation to you to know that he died doing his duty as a soldier'.

Private 10899 Henry (Harry) Mitchell

 

6th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 17th July 1916,  Aged 24.

Commemorated Thiepval Memorial, pier & face 2 C & 3 A. 

 

 

Henry Mitchell, known as Harry, was born in Loughborough in 1892, the son of William and Sarah Mitchell (née Clarke) who were married in Loughborough in 1881. Harry had three brothers George, William and John and four sisters Alice, Elizabeth, Florrie and Nancy. In 1891 the family lived at 12 Railway Terrace, Loughborough. Harry's father was a platelayer for the Midland Railway Company. By 1901 the family had moved to 24 Morley Street and Harry's father was now a railway foreman. By 1911 they had moved to 27 Gordon Street and Harry, now aged 19, was a car fitter for an engineering works. Harry's parents later moved to 2 Conery Terrace and then 17 Cradock Street.

Harry enlisted at Loughborough as soon as war broke out. He joined the 6th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment, part of Kitchener's First New Army, as Private 10899. Harry was then sent to Bordon, near Aldershot, Hampshire where the emphasis was on individual training, squadron and platoon drill. In March 1915 the battalion went into billets in Liphook.

In April 1915 the 6th Battalion became part of the 37th Division of the Army and concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the 37th Division was inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July 1915 the Division began to cross the English Channel and by 2nd August all units were concentrated near Tilques not far from St.Omer in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais. Harry embarked for France on 29th July 1915.

In September Harry's battalion moved via Watten, Houlie, St. Omer, Eecke and Dranoutre to Wulverghem and Berles-au-Bois, a short distance from the front line south-west of Arras. In the months that followed the 6th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 8th Leicesters who relieved them. The battalion was engaged in localised operations seeking a tactical advantage and remained in the area around Bienvillers and Bailleulmont until July 1916.

On 1st July 1916 the 6th Battalion moved from Saulty to Humbercamps, where it was held in reserve for the Somme Offensive which had just begun. On 6th July the battalion marched to Talmas to join the Army's 21st Division. From 7th to 10th July the battalion was in Hengest-sur-Somme, and from there on 10th marched to Ailly, entrained for Méricourt, took buses to Méaulte, and then proceeded to Fricourt. From 14th - 17th July the battalion took part in the attack on Bazentin Ridge and successfully captured Bazentin-le-Petit Wood and village. Harry, aged 24, was killed in action in this battle.

Harry is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Pier and Face 2C and 3A.

Harry's brothers John and George also enlisted in August 1914. John joined the 7th Battalion of the Leicesters but was discharged a month later as medically unfit. George served with the 1/5th Leicesters and was wounded in the chest in 1915 but survived the war.

Private 8913 Arthur Monk

 

2nd Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in action 25th September 1915,   Aged 26.

Commemorated Loos Memorial, panel 42 - 44.

 

Arthur Monk was born in Loughborough in 1889, the son of Arthur and Mary Elizabeth Monk (née Broster). His father was a bell hanger and his parents were married in the Wirral in 1882. Arthur had two brothers Horace and Herbert and three sisters Edith, Annie and Doris. Another sister Hursilla had died, aged 16, in 1908. In 1901 the Monk family was living at 60 Russell Street, Loughborough.

When Arthur Monk Senior died in 1909 his widow took a position as housekeeper to William Henry Young at 22 Factory Street, Loughborough. Her youngest children Edith, Annie, Doris and Herbert went with their mother to Factory Street and in 1911 are listed as boarders there. Arthur's brother Horace had married and was living at 36 Freehold Street, Loughborough. Maria Monk later moved to High Street, Quorn.

Arthur himself had joined the 2nd Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 8913 and in 1911 was with his battalion in India. He served in various locations including Madras, Wellington, Bareilly and Ranikhet.

When war broke out he 2nd Leicesters were brought from India to France as the British Battalion of the Garhwal Brigade of the 7th Indian Division. They arrived in Marseilles on 11th October 1914 and travelled north to the war zone. They were one of the units chosen to spearhead the allied assault at Neuve Chapelle (10th-13th March 1915).

Along with their Indian comrades the 2nd Leicesters attacked the German position known as Port Arthur, near La Bombe crossroads. The Garhwal Brigade's Indian battalions were held up by uncut wire, but the 2nd Battalion of the Tigers led the attack on the right and smashed a way through or over all obstacles and quickly overwhelmed the enemy holding the trenches covering the village and woods at Neuve Chapelle. On 9th May, the Garhwal Brigade was used as a second wave in the first attacks of the Battle of Aubers Ridge, without success; they saw action again on the night of 15th May at the beginning of the Battle of Festubert where the leading battalions met heavy resistance and the attack was called off.

The 2nd Leicesters spent the next couple of months alternately in the trenches or in billets while war training, in the area of Calonne and Vieille Chapelle north-east of Bethune. The corps was then rested in a quiet sector until it was deployed for the Battle of Loos.

The initial attack at Loos was to be made by three divisions, with the Meerut Division leading the attack on the Indian front; Blackader's brigade, with two Gurkha battalions and the 2nd Leicesters, was on its right flank. Whilst the attack successfully crossed no-man's land under cover of the barrage, the right flank of the brigade was caught up in defensive wire, and only one battalion successfully made its way into the German trenches. Gas also affected some of the men and the smoke caused a dense fog, making direction difficult. From the 2nd battalion 72 men were killed, 217 wounded, 42 were gassed, and 96 were recorded as missing. Arthur, aged 26, was one of the men killed.

Private 20802 George William Monk

 

10th Bn, Sherwood Foresters.

Died of Wounds 14th September 1916,   Aged 33.

Buried Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery II. G. 5.

 

George William Monk was born in Brimington, Derbyshire, in 1883. He was the son of John Monk, a bricklayer's labourer from Hathern, Leicestershire, and his wife Elizabeth (née Barson) who were married in 1867 in the Shardlow registration area. In 1891 the family lived at Sunny Hill, Duffield, Derbyshire. George had two brothers Thomas and John and three sisters Lucy, Mary and Ellen. After George's father died in 1900 the family moved to 1 Wood Lane, Milford, Derbyshire and George, now 17, was a clerk at Strutt's cotton bleach works. By 1911 George's mother had moved again, this time to 49 Rendell Street, Loughborough.

George enlisted in about January 1915 and joined the 10th (Service) Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) as Private 20802. He was sent for training at Wool, Dorset, and then to Winchester in June 1915.

As George's service record has not survived it is not known when he was sent to France. A large group of the 10th Sherwood Foresters landed at Boulogne on 14th July 1915 and concentrated with their Division (the 17th Northern) near St. Omer. For the rest of 1915, after a period of trench familiarisation, they held the front lines in the southern area of the Ypres Salient. George, however, may not have been with the battalion at this point as he married Emily Handy at St. Editha's Church, Tamworth, Staffordshire, in the late autumn of 1915.

In 1916 the 10th Sherwood Foresters were involved in fighting at the Bluff (south-east of Ypres on the Comines Canal), part of a number of engagements officially known as the Actions of Spring 1916.

By the beginning of July 1916 the battalion had moved to the Somme and were in the area of Morlancourt and Montauban-de-Picardie. They saw action from 1st-7th July during the Battle of Albert in attacks north of Fricourt (1st July), at Lozenge Wood (2nd July), Fricourt Wood (3rd July) and north-east of Fricourt (7th July). On 11th July they entrained at Meaulté for Saleux and from there marched to St. Pierre à Gouy. From there they marched to Ailly-le-Haut-Clocher and then Hangest where they entrained for Méricourt, arriving there on 23rd July.

At the beginning of August they were in the trenches near Pommiers and on 5th August relieved the Duke of Wellington's Regiment in the trenches at Longueval. Here they experienced heavy enemy shelling. The battalion was involved on 7th August in an unsuccessful attack on Delville Wood. On 14th August the battalion was ordered to entrain at Méricourt for Candas and march to Longuevillette. This was followed by a move to Neuvillette and a transfer into billets at Humbercourt on 21st August.

September began with four days in the trenches east of Fonquevillers. From 4th to 9th September the battalion provided assistance to the 181st Tunnelling Coy of the Royal Engineers. On 10th September the battalion was relieved and marched to Mondicourt and then to Halloy where they remained until 17th September.

It is not known at what point George was wounded but he died from his wounds in No. 43 Casualty Clearing Station on 14th September, aged 33. He is buried at Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, Saulty, Grave II. G. 5. He is commemorated on the memorial at All Saints Church, Loughborough, as well as on the Carillon.

George's only child, a daughter called Georgina, was born in Loughborough between October and December 1916. George's widow, Emily, was remarried in 1919 in Chesterfield to John T. Spencer and went to live at 26 Barber Lane, Killamarsh, Sheffield. 

Private 3600 John Monk

 

1/5th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 13th October 1915, Aged 23.

Commemorated Loos Memorial Panels 42-44.

 

John Monk was born in Hathern in late 1893 or early 1894, the son of Frederick Watts Monk and his wife Ellen Elizabeth (née Dexter). His parents were married in Hathern in 1887. John's father was a hosiery framework knitter for most of his life but between 1911 and 1922 he became licensed victualler of The Royal Oak in Long Whatton. In her younger days John's mother was also a framework knitter. John had two older sisters Margaretta and Clarissa and between 1891 and 1901 the Monk family lived at Wide Street, Hathern and in 1911 in Derby Road, Hathern.

 By 1911 John, aged 17, was an apprentice lace draughtsman and in the summer of 1914 he married Sarah Ann Margaret Spencer (known as Margaret) in Hathern. The couple settled in Gladstone Street, Hathern, and in late September 1914 their first child, Neville, was born. Margaret later moved to 61 Cumberland Road, Loughborough.

John attested into the Territorial Force to serve 4 years' service in the United Kingdom or abroad on the 6th January 1915 in Loughborough. He initially joined the 2/5th (Reserve) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 3600 and was sent to join the battalion at Luton for training. In July 1915 the battalion moved to St. Albans and became part of the Army's 59th Division. On 16th August 1915 John was transferred to the 1/5th Leicestershire Regiment and went to France two days later.

He joined his battalion in the Ypres Salient, near Zillebeke, where on 1st September 1915 in reply to an Allied bombardment, the Germans heavily shelled the Leicestershires' trenches causing many casualties. At the beginning of October the battalion was ordered to move towards Loos. On 12th October 1915 they travelled to the Hohenzollern Redoubt, arriving in Vermelles at 10.00pm. They spent the next eight hours in communication trenches. On 13th October 1915 during the attack on the Redoubt, part of the final stages of the Battle of Loos, the 1/5th Battalion was in reserve until just after midday, when they 'went over the top' and came under intense machine gun fire. John was killed, aged 23, during the attack.

John is remembered on the Loos Memorial Panels 42-44, on the Memorial Cross in Hathern Cemetery, on the memorial in St. Peter and St. Paul's Church, Hathern and on the memorial in the former St. Peter's Church building in Loughborough.

John never saw his daughter Madie who was born early in 1916 and who died, aged only three in 1919. John's widow Margaret was married again in 1920 in Loughborough to George W. Gilbert and moved to 22 Leopold Street.

Corporal 1401 Harry Wood Moore

 

2nd Bn, Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Killed in Action 25th September 1915, Aged 22.

Commemorated Loos  Memorial, panel 22 - 25. 

 

 

Harry Wood Moore was born at High Street, Barwell, Leicestershire, on 5th November 1892, the son of George Moore and Annie Moore (née Wood). His parents were married at Barwell on 25th November 1888, and at that time his father was a shoe finisher. By 1901 Harry was with the family at Long Street, Atherstone St. Mary, Warwickshire, and his father had changed occupation - George was now a coal miner (hewer).

By 1911 Harry's father had changed jobs again and was now a foreman in a shoe factory and living with his wife and three youngest children next to the Post Office in Stapleton, Hinckley. Leicestershire. Harry, meanwhile, had joined the army and was a Private with the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment.

Harry had three siblings: Amelia, Selina, and Cyril. (Six other siblings had died when young.) Harry also had four half-brothers whom he never knew by his father's second wife Mabel Holmes, an American from New Jersey. Harry's own mother had died in 1913 and his father had married again at Woodhouse, Leicestershire, in the spring of 1915. Harry's older sister Amelia, now Mrs. James Hall, lived at 6 Fox Yard, Wellington Street, Loughborough.

When war broke out Harry's battalion was stationed in Malta. The battalion returned to England on 19th September, joined the 22nd Brigade of the Army's 7th Division and moved to Lyndhurst, Hampshire. After training they proceeded to Belgium, landing at Zeebrugge on 6th October 1914. Harry had now achieved the rank of Corporal.

The 7th Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front, including the 1st Battle of Ypres and the Battles of Neuve Chapelle, Aubers, and Festubert, the 2nd action of Givenchy, and the Battle of Loos. Harry was killed in action on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

84203 Airman Mech. 3rd Class Herbert Bolton Moore

 

Royal Flying Corps.

Died at Connaught Hospital Farnborough 7th June 1917,  Aged 25.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery 6/159

 

Herbert Bolton Moore was born in 1891 in Loughborough and baptised on 25th July 1891 at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough. He was the only child of James Robert Carter Moore and his wife Annie (née Bolton) who were married at the Church of St. John the Baptist, Beeston, Nottinghamshire, on 19th March 1888. The Moore family lived at 28 Devonshire Square, Loughborough, and Herbert's father was a commercial clerk in a hosiery dyeworks. By 1901 they had moved to 28 Cattle Market but in 1902 Herbert's father died.

Herbert's mother Annie, now aged 45, was remarried on 5th August at All Saints' Church, Loughborough, to David Roberts, a hairdresser aged 26. Both gave their address as 51 Broad Street. By 1911 David and Annie Roberts and Herbert had moved to Field Street, Shepshed, and Annie was assisting her husband in the business. Herbert was now nineteen and a labourer in a bottling stores. Between 1911 and 1916 Herbert moved back to Loughborough, to 13 Garden Street.

Herbert enlisted on 2nd March 1916 but was not called up for service until 21st May 1917. He joined the Royal Flying Corps as Airman Mechanic (3rd Class) 84203 and was sent to Aldershot. Eighteen days later he died, aged 25, at the Connaught Hospital, Aldershot, from a cerebral abscess. He was buried in Loughborough Cemetery, Grave 6/159.

Private 40760 William Moore

 

1st Bn. Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 14th July 1918,  Aged 23.

Commemorated Tyne Cott Memorial panel 50 - 51.

 

saved as moorehouse check name
need photo

Second Lieutenant Frederick Walter Moss

 

8th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment. Attd. 98th Field Coy, Royal Engineers.

Killed in Action 28th May 1918,  Aged 24.

Commemorated Soissons Memorial.

 

Frederick was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Moss, of Parks Farm, Loughborough. Sec. Lieut. F. W. Moss was educated at the Loughborough Grammar School prior to entering Jesus College, Cambridge, where he graduated and took his degree. He joined the Suffolk Regt, as a private in 1916, after completing his studies at College. After obtaining his commission he was transferred to the Leicestershire Regiment, and had been in France about 12 months when the news of his death was received.

Lieutenant Gerald Alec Moss

 

19th Bn, Attd. 2nd Bn. Manchester Regiment.

Killed in Action 10th August 1918,  Aged 19.

Commemorated Vis-En-Artois Memorial. panel 9.                              

 

 

Lieut. Alec Moss, was the second son of Mr. Charles Moss, of West Bridgeford, Notts, of the firm of W. Moss and Sons, Ltd., Loughborough, and grandson of Ald. W. Moss, J.P. The deceased officer who was 19 years of age, and educated at Hulme Grammar School, was apprenticed with a firm of building contractors with a view to entering his fathers business. He joined the London Artists O.T.C., and afterwards obtained his commission with the Manchester Regiment. His elder brother, Capt. W. Moss has seen a great deal of service, and is now in hospital as a result of injuries received accidentally. The deceased officer mother was the adopted daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Harriman of Shepshed, and much sympathy will be extended to both branches of the family in their bereavement.

Second Lieutenant Howard James Harding Moss

 

A Coy. 1/5th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 13th October 1915,  Aged 19.

Buried Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery XXVII. G. 47.                                       

 

 

KILLED LEADING HIS MEN

Howard James Harding Moss was born on 20th June 1896, the eldest son of Wilfred Moss C.B.E. and Elizabeth Maud Moss (née Harding) who were married in Loughborough in 1892. Howard's father was a solicitor who had a practice at 80-81 Woodgate, Loughborough. Howard had an older sister Nora and three younger brothers Kenneth, Ewart and Malcolm. In 1901 the family lived at 3 Burton Street, Loughborough, but by 1911 had moved to the Knoll, Nanpantan, Loughborough.

Howard was educated firstly at Loughborough Grammar School and from 1906-1911 he joined his two cousins at William Hulme's Grammar School, Manchester. Thereafter he entered the business of William Moss and Sons Ltd., building contractors, of Loughborough, a firm founded by his grandfather.

For some time Howard was assistant scoutmaster of the Nanpantan Troop of Boy Scouts, in whose work he took a great interest, and with the scoutmaster was largely responsible for the high efficiency of the troop, one of the smartest in the county.

In August 1914 Howard obtained his commission in the Army in 1914 as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 1/5th Leicestershire Regiment and was attached to the 2/5th Battalion at Luton and St. Albans where he was promoted to Lieutenant.

Howard was keen for active service and, relinquishing his recent promotion, proceeded to the Front as a 2nd Lieutenant to join the 5th Leicesters. He arrived in France on 24th August 1915 and on the 31st joined "A" Company of his Regiment in the trenches near Kruisstraat in the Ypres Salient.

On 1st September 1915 in reply to an Allied bombardment, the Germans heavily shelled the Leicestershires' trenches causing many casualties. Howard and a fellow officer, 2nd Lieutenant Tomson, had two miraculous escapes when firstly a 5.9" dud passed straight through the roof of their dugout and on into the ground almost grazing Tomson's side. Immediately thereafter they went round to the dugout of Captain Hastings and the three had only just left when this too was blown in.

Lieutenant Moss was a most promising young officer, exceedingly popular with his men of the 5th Leicesters. He quickly proved his abilities as an officer, and was highly esteemed by his colleagues. On the day of the action in which he lost his life, aged 19, he was given a position and duties of a very important nature leading his men into battle at Loos. He was killed in action on 13th October 1915.

Writing to Mr. Wilfred Moss, Lieutenant Colonel C. H. Jones, commanding the 5thLeicesters said: 'You will doubtless have heard officially already of the death of your son. I am so very sorry about it. I had only just written to you to say how much I valued him. We were in attack on the 13thOctober, and your son was splendid. He did all that duty and honour could demand. He was killed leading his men in battle, and when that has been said all that can be said has been said. In all sympathy with you in your great sorrow'.

In the letter referred to, written only the day before the action, Lieutenant Colonel Jones said of the deceased officer: 'I have now been with your son for a month, and am able to judge his work. I am glad to have him. I find him sensible and steady in his duties. I have had occasion to give him special work and to consult him on more than one occasion, and he has not failed me yet. My excuse for writing is that I feel a certain amount of responsibility for these young people, and it will interest you to hear perhaps that his worth is appreciated, and I am sure he will do well'.

Howard James Harding Moss is buried at Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez, Grave XXVII. G.47. He is commemorated on memorials at St. Mary's in Charnwood Churchyard, Nanpantan, Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, Loughborough Baptist Church, Loughborough Grammar School, and William Hulme's Grammar School, Manchester. His younger brother Ewart also died in 1915, aged 11.

Howard's father, Wilfred Moss, was the original proposer of a Carillon as Loughborough's war memorial. He was also Mayor of Loughborough 1922-23, when the Carillon was opened.

Bell no. 8 in the Carillon bears the following inscription:

The gift of the Sons of William and Anne Moss, third Mayor and Mayoress of this borough, two of whose grandsons, Howard James Harding Moss (2nd Lieut., 5th Leicesters) and Gerald Alec Moss (2nd Lieut., 2nd Manchesters), fell in the Great War

Private 4351 Harry Mounteney

 

2/5th Bn. Durham Light Infantry.

Died at Home 6th April 1916, Aged 26.

Buried East Retford  Cemetery A. J. 129.

 

Harry Mounteney (or Mountney) was born in Loughborough in 1890, the eldest son of Thomas Mounteney (or Mountney) a general labourer, and his wife Mary (née Simpkin). Harry's parents were married in Loughborough in 1888. Harry had four brothers Herbert, Arthur, George and Walter and three sisters Emma, Ada and Clara. In 1890 the family home was at 2 Court B, Baxter Gate, Loughborough, in 1901 at 16 Bridge Street, and in 1911 at 29 Falcon Street. The family later moved to 5 Falcon Street. In 1911 Harry was a basket maker.

Harry enlisted and joined the 2/5th Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry as Private 4351. This battalion was a Reserve unit in the 63rd (2nd Northumbrian) Division of the Army. Divisional HQ was set up at Newcastle upon Tyne and took responsibility for coastal defences of the sector Seaham Harbour - Sunderland - Newcastle. Harry was based at Cramlington Camp, nine miles north of Newcastle upon Tyne and King George V inspected the Division at Newcastle on 20 May 1915. In November 1915 Harry was posted with his battalion to Retford, Nottinghamshire.

Harry died at Retford Hospital on 6th April 1916, aged 26, and is buried in East Retford Cemetery, Grave A.J. 129. Harry's Company paraded at full strength at the funeral and followed the gun carriage which was also accompanied by the Battalion band, to the grave. The service was conducted by Major Lomax (Chaplain) and after volleys had been fired the Last Post was sounded over the grave. In addition to the family floral tributes, others were sent by Colonel Williams-Till and Officers, and the N.C.Os and men of the Company.

Private 12823 Charles Henry Mowbray

 

8th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 26th July 1916, Aged 21.

Buried Wimereux Communal  Cemetery I. O. 24A.

 

Charles Henry Mowbray was born in Loughborough in 1894, the son of Edward Mowbray, a general labourer, and Emily Mowbray (née Tapp) who were married in Loughborough in 1884. He had one brother John (known as Jack) and two sisters Edith and Ethel. In 1901 the family lived at 48 Wood Gate, and in 1911 at 47 Cumberland Rd, Loughborough. In 1911 Charles was a brickyard labourer.

Charles enlisted on 1st September 1914 in Loughborough. He joined the 8th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 12823. sent firstly to Aldershot for training. He moved to Shorncliffe in Kent at the end of February 1915. In April 1915 Charles's battalion became part of the newly established 37th Division of Kitchener's 2nd New Army and the Division began to concentrate on Salisbury Plain. Charles was billeted at Perham Down. On 25th June the units were inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July the Division began to cross the English Channel and Charles travelled to France on 29th July 1915. Initially the 37th Division concentrated near Tilques.

The 8th Battalion then moved via Watten, Houlie, St. Omer, Eecke and Dranoutre to Wulverghem and Berles-au-Bois, a short distance from the front line. On 28th October 1915 Charles was admitted to No. 49 Field Ambulance with scabies. He rejoined his battalion a week later.

In the months that followed the 8th Battalion did tours in the trenches, alternating with the 6th Leicesters who relieved them. They were Involved in operations in Bailleul, Le Bizet, Armentières, Mondicourt, Beauval and Berles-au-Bois.

In April 1916 the 8th Leicesters moved to the Doullens area for six weeks for cleaning up, resting and training. In mid-May they returned once more to the trenches in the Bienvillers-Bailleulmont sector, but nearer Gommecourt. In June there was a series of nightly excursions into No-Man's Land with patrols attempting to gather information on the enemy's dispositions. On other occasions there were working parties out repairing the British barbed wire entanglements. The situation became increasingly hazardous as the month wore on when the Germans began to use a new and more accurate type of trench mortar.

The 8th Battalion did not participate in the first days of the Somme Offensive but was held in reserve. On 6th July they left billets at Humbercamps and marched to Talmas, continuing on the following day to billets in Soues. On 10th July the battalion marched to Ailly-sur-Somme, entrained for Méricourt and travelled from there by lorry to bivouacs in Méaulte. Between 10th and 13th July the battalion was in the trenches near Fricourt and subjected to fairly continuous enemy fire.

On 14th July the battalion advanced on Bazentin Le Petit Wood and Charles received gunshot wounds to his back and chest. He was taken to No. 64 Field Ambulance. Five days later he was admitted to No. 14 Stationary Hospital at Wimereux near Boulogne where he died, aged 21, on 26th July. He was buried in Wimereux Communal Cemetery, Grave Reference 1.0.24A.

Charles's brother Jack served with the Royal Garrison Artillery and survived the war.

Private John Mullholland

 

4th Bn, Worcestershire Regiment.

Died at the General Hospital 22nd December 1920,  Aged 42.

Buried Loughborough Cemetery 11/186

 

John was an Iron Monger

John Mullholland

Has no memorial on his grave.

Private 5962 Walter Murdoch

 

1st Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 20th July 1915, Aged 35.

Buried La Brique Military Cemetery I. O. 30.                                   

 

 

Walter Murdoch was born in Nottingham in 1884, the son of Walter Nathaniel Murdoch, a warehouseman, and his second wife Mary Jane Hallam, who were married in Nottingham in 1876.

Walter was already involved with the 1st Volunteer Battalion of the Robin Hood Rifles when he attested for the Militia on 19th September 1900 at Leicester. He subsequently enlisted at Curragh Camp, Ireland, on 14th November 1900. On attesting he falsified his age, stating that he was 18 rather than 16. He was appointed as Private 5962 in the 3rd Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment on 22nd January 1901, with his surname erroneously spelt as Murdock. In February 1901 he was posted to Egypt for almost two years. Following this, and after a ten-month break in England, he was sent to India for five years in October 1903.

After his return to England in December 1908 Walter became a Reservist, and was employed as a hosiery counterman at the Nottingham Manufacturing Company. He married Elizabeth Watson in Loughborough in 1910 and they set up home at 15 Ratcliffe Road, later moving to 36 Freehold Street. Walter and Elizabeth had two children: Walter (born 1911) and Eric (born 1914).

When war broke out in 1914 Walter was recalled to the colours. He was sent to France on 9th November 1914 where he joined the 1st Leicesters who were fighting at the First Battle of Ypres. In June and July 1915 the 1st Leicesters were fighting again at Hooge and it was here that Walter lost his life on 20th July, aged 35. His wife heard of his death from a comrade in the same regiment before she was officially informed.

Private CH/1427(S) Leonard Musson

 

1st R.M. Bn, R.N. Div. Royal Marine Light Infantry. 

Killed in Action 28th April 1917,  Aged 21.

Commemorated Arras Memorial bay 1               

 

 

Leonard Musson was born on 15th December 1895 in Loughborough, and baptised at All Saints' Church, Loughborough, on 4th January 1898. He was the son of Lawrence Musson, a plasterer, and his wife Nellie (née West) who were married at All Saints' Church on 28th June 1894. Leonard had one brother Lawrence and five sisters Elsie, Millie, Nellie, Hilda and Bessie. In 1898 the family lived at 40 Paget Street but by 1901 they had moved to 10 Havelock Street. By 1911 Leonard, aged 15, had joined his father as an apprentice plasterer.

Leonard enlisted at Nottingham on 27th January 1916. He joined the Royal Marines and was posted to the Recruit Depot at Deal, Kent, as Private CH/1427/S. For a regular marine the training took a year and included artillery training for sea service and infantry training for land service, but this training was shortened due to the war. Leonard's character was assessed as 'Very Good' and his ability as 'Satisfactory'. On 15th April 1916 he was transferred to his Divisional Depot of Chatham Dockyard as part of E Coy to await posting to a Royal Navy ship or Royal Marine battalion in the 63rd (Royal Naval) Division.

On 26th July 1916 he was registered as Royal Marine Brigade at the shore base HMS Victory V. On 25th September 1916 he was drafted to the British Expeditionary Force and joined the 4th Entrenching Battalion, a temporary unit from which drafts of men could be drawn.

On 10th November 1916 he joined the 1st Battalion of the Royal Marine Light Infantry (known as the Red Marines). At the time the battalion was holding the Varennes line in the Hamel sector. Two days later the battalion moved up to battle positions and went into the attack on 13th November in the Battle of the Ancre. St. Pierre Divion and Beaumont-Hamel were captured and nearly 4,000 prisoners taken. Casualties overall, however, were high and on 15th November the battalion was withdrawn to Puchvillers. From there over six days the battalion marched to Morlay.

Leonard now unfortunately developed an abscess in his right shoulder, was hospitalised and did not rejoin his battalion from the Base depot until 14th February 1917. His battalion had just relieved the 10th Royal Dublin Fusiliers in the River Trench sector, north of Grandcourt. On 16th February the battalion lined up for an attack in the area of the Ancre. This attack once again produced heavy casualties.

On 19th they moved to the old German lines south-east of Beaumont-Hamel and from there to Engelbelmer where a battalion reorganisation took place. On 28th February they moved to the Bruce Huts near Aveluy where they remained until 19th March working on road repairs, undergoing instruction and drill.

On 19th March the battalion began a nine days march to Labourse where, after further training, they moved into the line in the Angres II sector and found that the enemy had retreated. From 16th to 23rd April the battalion cleaned up and repaired roads in the area of Maroeuil before working on trench improvement near Gavrelle. On 28th April the battalion, now in the front line trenches, was ordered to attack the Oppy-Maricourt Line. Leonard, who had joined the battalion's 'D' Company Lewis Gun Section for this attack, was reported missing in action and was assumed dead on 28th April 1917. He was just 21.

Leonard is remembered on the Arras Memorial Bay 1 and on the Carillon.

Lance Corporal 40576 Arthur Needham

 

12th Bn, Prince of Wales's (West Yorkshire) Regiment

Died of Wounds 4th May 1917,  Aged 26.

Buried Faubourg d'Amiens Cemetery, Arras, V. D. 16.

 

Arthur Needham was born in Shepshed in 1891, the son of Arthur Needham and his wife Maria (née Thurman) who were married at St. Botolph's Church, Shepshed on 19th May 1890. In 1891 Arthur's father was a woollen glove hand and his mother was a woollen glove stitcher and in 1891 the Needham family lodged with Miss Ann Tabb in Leicester Road, Shepshed. Arthur's father died in 1909 and his mother moved to Forest Road, Shepshed, with her children. Arthur Junior had one brother Thomas and five sisters Elizabeth, Kate, Emma, Mary Ann and Annie. Another brother John had died aged two.

In 1911 Arthur Junior was an out-of-work shoe-hand while his mother worked as a charwoman. Arthur subsequently found work as a farm hand and in 1914 was living at 22 Mill Street, Loughborough. He married Rebecca May Smith, a shoe trade polisher, on 4th October 1914 at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough and their daughter Elizabeth May was baptised at Emmanuel Church on 2nd August 1916.

Arthur enlisted in the summer of 1915 and joined the 12th (Service) Battalion of the Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire) Regiment as Private 40576. His service record has not survived but it is known that after preliminary training, he was sent to France sometime in 1916 or 1917. The 12th West Yorkshire Battalion received large batches of reinforcements in April, June, July, September and November 1916 and also in February and April 1917 and Arthur would have been in one of these groups.

If Arthur joined his battalion in April 1916 he would have joined them in the area of Méteren and Locre in West Flanders where the battalion was doing tours in the front line trenches. In June he would have joined the battalion in the front line at Reninghelst or at billets in Bailleul. By early July the battalion had moved to Morlancourt, Somme, and was in action at the battle of Bazentin Ridge from 14th-17th July and at Longueval on 23rd July. In mid-August the battalion was heavily shelled south of Guillemont, and on 8th September heavily trench-mortared at Noeux-les-Mines.

After a period of respite in billets at Petigny, Rupigny and Berquigny the battalion did trench tours at Serre until early December, with rest periods at Courcelles. January and February 1917 were mostly spent in training at Feiffes and Houvin-Houvieneul and training continued at Liencourt from 1st-18th March. On 27th March the battalion moved to Arras and were billeted in a cellar, Arras being heavily shelled. On 9th April the battalion advanced on Tilloy and achieved their objective despite determined enemy resistance before moving on to trenches near Monchy and going into the attack at Guemappe. They returned to the trenches near Tilloy in early May.

It is not known at which point Arthur was wounded but he died from his wounds, aged 26, on 4th May 1917. By the time he died he had been promoted to Lance Corporal. Arthur was buried in Faubourg d'Amiens Cemetery, Arras, Grave V. D. 16. He is remembered on the Shepshed War Memorial.




Shepshed War Memorial


Private 10464 Thomas Needham

 

1st Bn. Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regt.)

Died of Wounds 12th June 1915, Aged 26.

Buried Boulogne Eastern Cemetery VIII. A. 78.

 

Thomas Needham was born in 1889 in Shepshed, the eldest son of George and Mary Needham (née Wesley) who were married in 1887. Thomas' father was a rotary machine hand in the hosiery business, his mother was a hosiery seamer and in 1891 they lived in Belton Street, Shepshed. When Thomas' father died in 1900 his mother moved with her children Thomas, Joseph, William, Lizzie Ann and Zach to Leicester Rd, Shepshed. She later moved to 7 Moor Lane, Loughborough, then to 2 Wheatsheaf Yard and subsequently to 58 Regent Street, and finally to 30 Wood Gate.

Thomas, a general labourer, enlisted at Nottingham 7th October 1907 aged 18 and joined the 1st Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters as Private 10464. In 1909 he was posted to India for five years and served in Bangalore, Secunderabad, Deolali (where he caught malaria), and Colaba (part of Bombay, now Mumbai). He returned to England at the beginning of September 1914 and left for France on 4th November as part of the British Expeditionary Force.

In January 1915 the battalion was holding trenches facing Neuve Chapelle, not far from Richebourg and in one three day period had 73 casualties. The trenches were either frozen or flooded and men had to move over open ground to the front line, with the enemy only 120 yards away. In March Thomas fought at the Battle of Neuve Chapelle and on 9th May was wounded in action at the Battle of Aubers Ridge. He was moved to Boulogne General Hospital, but died from his wounds almost a month later, aged 26. He is buried at Boulogne Eastern Cemetery Grave VIII.A.78.

Private 40788 Arthur Newbold

 

6th Bn. Lincolnshire Regiment.

Died of Wounds 25th July 1917,  Aged 30.

Buried Essex Farm Cemetery Boezinge, II. H. 6.

 

Arthur Newbold was born in 1886 in Loughborough, the son of Martha Newbold (née Wheldon). Martha had married Charles Newbold, a labourer, on 5th June 1876 at All Saints Church, Loughborough, but Charles had died in 1883 three years before Arthur was born. In 1891 Martha was living at 12 Factory Street, Loughborough, with William Newbold, the older brother of Charles Newbold, a machine labourer, and two daughters Jane and Elizabeth from her marriage to Charles Newbold. In the household were also Arthur, William and Ernest Newbold whose father(s) are unknown.

By 1901 Martha was living at 21 Buckhorn Square, Loughborough, but without William Newbold who had moved to 20 Queen Street, Loughborough. She was earning her living as a charwoman and had four children with her, Arthur and Ernest Newbold, Albert (Lakin) Newbold and Florence Lakin Newbold. Arthur, aged 14, was an errand boy. On 5th July 1902 Martha Newbold married Arthur Lakin, a gardener and father of her two youngest children at All Saints Church, Loughborough and moved to 112 Freehold Street.

By 1911 Arthur had moved away from Loughborough. He was employed as a brickmaker by Williamsons of Stamford, Lincolnshire and was in lodgings with the Collins family at 4 Crocks Court, Stamford. On 2nd October 1915 he married May Dennis in Stamford and on 28th June 1916 their daughter Rose was born at 6 School Terrace, Stamford. After Rose was born May moved with her daughter to 40 North Street, Stamford.

In June 1916, Arthur enlisted with the Lincolnshire Regiment in Stamford, initially as Private 5972 with the 1/4th Battalion but on arrival at base camp was almost immediately transferred to and served with the 6th Battalion as Private 40788. He was most probably conscripted. The date on which he was sent to France is unknown as his service papers have not survived. The battalion’s war diary, however, notes that the battalion received reinforcements in October and November 1916 and Arthur is likely to have been in one of these drafts.

From October until mid-November 1916 the battalion was at Cramont, Somme, in training. On 14th November the battalion returned to the line in a wretched part of the battlefield, a ravine west of Beaucourt where the front line consisted largely of unconnected shell holes, full of mud and water. Here the battalion came under heavy fire. Further trench tours followed with rest periods at Engelbelmer until February 1917 when the battalion moved to Hanchy and Le Festel for railway construction.

Between 9th March and 24th April 1917 the battalion was used for further railway work in the Authie Valley before returning to the front line at Louverval.

In May, in the build-up to the Flanders Offensive, the battalion was moved to the Wytschaete sector of the line on the Ypres Salient. Between the 7th and 14th June the battalion took part in the Battle of Messines and incurred casualties of 6 Officers and 160 Other Ranks.

After the battle the battalion was withdrawn for training at Nortleulinghem before being sent back into the St. Jean sector of the line at Ypres in mid-July.

On 25th July 1917 Arthur, aged 30, died from gas shell poisoning, a shell having fallen into the dugout where he and some comrades were sleeping. He was buried at Essex Farm Cemetery, Boezinghe, near Ypres, Grave II. H. 6.

Arthur’s widow was married again in 1925 to Richard Henry Robinson of Stamford. Arthur’s daughter Rose died, aged 13, in 1929.

Sergeant 10250 Bertie Newbold

 

6th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment.

Killed in Action 9th June 1916,  Aged 25.

Buried Bienvillers Military Cemetery I. A. 26.

 

Bertie Newbold was born in Loughborough in 1891, the son of Charles Newbold and Mary Ann Newbold (née Ward) who were married in Loughborough in 1870. Charles and Mary Ann had ten children, six of whom survived to adulthood. Bertie was their youngest child; he had four brothers Willie, Charles, John, and Arthur and one sister Martha. Bertie's father was a house painter and Bertie, unlike his brothers, joined his father in the painting and decorating business. The family lived at 15 Russell Street, Loughborough, until all the children except Bertie had left home. At this point Bertie's parents and Bertie moved to 30 Russell Street.

Bertie enlisted at Loughborough on 19 August 1914 and joined the 6th (Service) Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 10250. He was sent to Bordon, Hampshire for training. On 24 September 1914 he was appointed Lance Corporal. On 26 February 1915 he was promoted to the position of Corporal (unpaid). In April 1915 the 6th Battalion became part of the 37th Division of the Army and concentrated at Cholderton on Salisbury Plain. On 25th June the 37th Division was inspected by King George V at Sidbury Hill. On 22nd July 1915 the Division began to cross the English Channel and by 2nd August all units were concentrated near Tilques not far from St.Omer in the Nord-Pas-de-Calais. Bertie embarked for France on 29th July 1915.

In September Bertie's battalion was sent to the area of Berles-au-Bois, south-west of Arras. The battalion remained in this area around Bienvillers and Bailleulmont until July 1916 and was engaged in localised operations seeking a tactical advantage. Having been confirmed in the rank of Corporal in February 1916 Bertie was simultaneously appointed as a Lance Sergeant, followed by another promotion to Acting Sergeant on 10th May 1916.

Bertie was 25 when he was killed. Sergeant Moffat Ecob of the 6th Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment wrote a letter to his parents describing the unfortunate deaths of Roland Austin, Frank Benskin, Bertie Newbold and Sidney Wade, all in the 6th Leicesters and all from Loughborough. Ecob had gone out to fetch a working party and on his return found that the dug-out at Saulty (13 miles south-west of Arras) where he had left his four friends had been hit by a shell, blowing it to pieces. All four men had been killed instantaneously.

Bertie is buried in Bienvillers Military Cemetery, Grave I. A. 26.

Private L/7570 Arthur Newbon

 

4th Bn, Middlesex Regiment.

Died of Wounds 14th December 1914,  Aged 32.

Buried Boulogne Eastern Cemetery III. B. 63.

Served under the alias of 'Arthur Newman'.

(his step brother Alfred John Parr also fell) 

 

 

Arthur Newbon, otherwise known as Arthur Newman, was born in 1883 to Charles Newbon, an engineering driller, and Sarah Jane Newbon of 107 Meadow Lane, Loughborough. Arthur's mother, however, unfortunately died in 1897. In 1900 Arthur's father was remarried to a widow, Elizabeth Ann Parr, and Arthur could have become part of the large blended family which lived at 19 Ratcliff Road, Loughborough. Now, as well as Arthur, his older brother James and his younger sister Mary Ellen there were three more boys from Elizabeth's first marriage, Alfred, Archie and John Parr. In addition there was Charles (the first of the eventual five children from Elizabeth's marriage to Charles Newbon) and an adopted daughter Mabel Barber. Arthur, however, was eager to be off.

In the wake of his father's second marriage, on 3rd December 1900 Arthur, a brown haired blue eyed lad, attested for the Leicestershire Regiment. On being medically examined he was rejected as being 'of defective physique' and 'not likely to become an efficient militiaman'.

Nothing daunted, on 23 July 1901, Arthur attested at Hounslow for the Middlesex Regiment (Duke of Cambridge's Own) and was accepted. He was posted to the 6th Middlesex Regiment, a militia battalion, on 6th September 1901. His attestation form on this occasion gives the first indication of a possible change of surname, the Recruiting Officer writing down the name Newman. Arthur nevertheless signed the form as 'Arthur Newbon'. On another form, however, he signed his name as 'Arthur Newman'.

Arthur next appears to have been transferred to the 2nd Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment, and subsequently to the 1st Battalion. His initial overseas posting was in 1902 to the Atlantic island of St. Helena where over five thousand Boer POWs were held, camped on 'Deadwood Plain' and 'Broad Bottom'. Arthur was awarded the Queen's South Africa Medal for his role in guarding these prisoners of war. He then served six years with the Middlesex Regiment in the East Indies.

In 1911 Arthur was lodging in Coventry where he was employed as a labourer at a motor works. In July 1914, he married a widow, Kate Ryan (née Johnson) in Coventry, under the alias of Arthur Newman.

When World War One broke out, Arthur was recalled and joined 'A' Company of the 4th Battalion of the Middlesex Regiment, stationed in Devonport. They promptly left for France as part of the British Expeditionary Force, landing in Boulogne on the 14th August 1914.

Arthur's battalion saw action in the Battle of Mons and its subsequent retreat, the Battles of Le Cateau, the Marne, the Aisne, La Bassée and Messines, and the First Battle of Ypres.

Arthur died of wounds on 14th December 1914 in no.13 General Hospital, Boulogne. He left behind his wife of three months, Kate Newman of Gosford Street, Coventry, and a young step-daughter Kate. Arthur's stepbrother, Alfred Parr, also fell during the war. His gravestone bears the name 'Newman', rather than 'Newbon', and his medals (Boer War and World War One) were also issued in the name of 'Arthur Newman'.

Name has been spelt wrong

Private 3657 Ernest Newton

 

1/5th Bn. Leicestershire Regiment. 

Killed in Action 13th October 1915,  Aged 31.                

Commemorated Loos Memorial panel 42 - 44                 

 

 

Ernest Newton was born on 24th May 1883 at Wheatsheaf Yard, Loughborough, the youngest son of Aaron and Fanny Newton (formerly Hallam, née Priestley) who were married in Loughborough in 1869. When Aaron and Fanny were married Aaron was a warp hand, but he later became a bricklayer's labourer at Tucker's Brickyard and finally a jobbing gardener.

Ernest had three brothers William, Robert and Walter and three sisters Eleanor, Fanny and Clara. Another sister Hannah (Mrs. Adams) had died in 1913, aged 37. He also had a half-brother John Hallam from his mother's first marriage to Henry Hallam. In 1891 the family lived at 1 Court C, Ward's End but by 1901 they had moved to 24 Woodgate.

Ernest, who like his father, was a brickmaker's labourer, married Annie Thornton in 1905 in Loughborough and the couple set up home at 13 Factory Street, Loughborough, with John Aaron Thornton, Annie's two-year old child from a previous relationship. In 1909 Ernest and Annie had a daughter of their own, Mary. Their son Thomas had died at birth in 1905.

Ernest enlisted in January 1915, giving his home address as Shepshed. He joined the 2/5th Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment as Private 3697 and was then drafted to the 1/5th Battalion. After a period of training at Luton and St. Albans he was sent to France on 17th August 1915. He joined his battalion in the Salient, near Zillebeke, where they remained until the beginning of October when they were ordered to move towards Loos.

On 12th October 1915 the battalion travelled to the Hohenzollern Redoubt, arriving in Vermelles at 10.00pm. They spent the next eight hours in communication trenches. On 13th October 1915 during the attack on the Redoubt, part of the final stages of the Battle of Loos, the 1/5th Battalion was in reserve until just after midday, when they 'went over the top' and came under intense machine gun fire. Ernest was killed aged 31, during the attack on the Redoubt, part of the final stages of the Battle of Loos.

Ernest is commemorated on the Loos Memorial, panel 42-44, on the Shepshed War Memorial and on the memorial at Emmanuel Church, Loughborough, as well as the Carillon.

His wife Annie had to wait a year before the War Office confirmed his death. She married James Oldham, a widower with older children, at the end of 1916 in Leicester and afterwards lived at 41 Cambridge Road, Loughborough.

Ernest's stepson John Aaron Thornton changed his surname to Newton and served as a Band Sergeant with the 1/5th Battalion of the Leicestershire Regiment from about 1920. He was immediately called to the Colours at the outbreak of World War Two and served in Norway and Ireland. John Aaron Thornton's son Clifford Newton also served with the Leicestershire Regiment and served in Germany, Sudan and Cyprus in the 1950s.

Annie's second husband James Oldham died in 1925 and she married William Hart six months later in Loughborough.

Leading Stoker K/2 Arthur North

 

Royal Navy HMS Hampshire

Killed in Action 5th June 1916.                

Commemorated Portsmouth Naval Memorial panel 16.                  

 

 

Arthur North was born on 11th November 1889 in Loughborough, the son of Arthur and Sarah North (née Hollingworth). His parents were married in Loughborough in 1880 and had seventeen children, eleven of whom survived to adulthood. Arthur had three brothers Edward, Harry and Isaiah, and seven sisters Jane, Sarah, Lilian, Lavinia, Catherine and Elizabeth (twins) and Evelyn. Arthur's father, Arthur North Senior, started out as a platelayer on the railway, became labourer for a horticulturer and in his later years a railway drayman. In 1891 the family lived at 8 Conery Passage, Loughborough, and by 1901 had moved to 116 Station Road. In 1911 Arthur's parents were living alone at 4 Dead Lane, all their children having left home. They later moved to 52 Regent Street, Loughborough.

Arthur had been working as a boilermaker's labourer when in January 1908, aged 18, he joined the Navy signing up for twelve years. He started his naval career as a Stoker 2 on HMS Nelson, a training ship. He then spent almost a year on HMS Essex, an armoured cruiser, towards the end of which he was promoted to Stoker 1. In June 1909 he was sent to HMS Blenheim, a Blake-class armoured cruiser, for almost six months before having a short break at the shore establishment HMS Victory II. In December 1909 he was sent to HMS Minotaur, a Minotaur-class armoured cruiser, where he remained until May 1912. This was followed by two months on the HMS Spartiate, a Diadem-class cruiser, and six months at HMS Victory I shore establishment. In 1913 Arthur served on HMS Aboukir, a Cressy-class cruiser, HMS Good Hope, a Drake-class armoured cruiser and HMS Europa, a Diadem-class cruiser. In January 1914 Arthur joined the HMS Hampshire, a Devonshire-class armoured cruiser and on 1st January 1916 was appointed to the rank of Leading Stoker.

HMS Hampshire was assigned to the Navy's 7th Cruiser Squadron in January 1915 and was detached in November 1915 to escort shipping in the White Sea. She returned home in time to participate in the Battle of Jutland on 31st May 1916 with the 2nd Cruiser Squadron. During the battle she was never actually engaged and immediately afterwards was ordered to carry Lord Kitchener from Scapa Flow on a diplomatic mission to Arkhangelsk. On 5th June 1916 in a gale force storm one and a half miles off the coast of Orkney between Brough of Birsay and Marwick Head HMS Hampshire unfortunately hit a German mine laid by a U-Boat. The detonation holed the cruiser between bows and bridge and the lifeboats were smashed against the side of the ship when they were lowered. About fifteen minutes after the explosion HMS Hampshire sank by the bows, taking all but twelve on board with her. According to the Ministry of Defence the ship's full complement at the time of sailing was 655 men and 7 passengers who were Lord Kitchener and his staff.

The bodies of over 100 officers and men were recovered from the sea and were interred into one common grave at the Lyness Cemetery, Hoy, Orkney.

Arthur is commemorated on the Portsmouth Naval Memorial panel 16 as well as on the memorial at St. Peter's Church, Loughborough, and on the Carillon. The Kitchener Memorial at Marwick Head, Orkney has been restored by the Orkney Heritage Society, with a new wall bearing the names of all those lost on HMS Hampshire. A tree for each man lost on HMS Hampshire has been planted by Woodland Trust Scotland in order to create HMS Hampshire Centenary Wood near Kirkwall Grammar School.

Arthur's brother Driver Harry North who was wounded at Mons and taken as a Prisoner of War to Germany, survived the war.
 
HMS Hampshire.

                                        

 

 

 

 

        Portsmouth Naval Memorial

Private 174355 Eric Arthur North

 

12th Coy. Canadian Machine Gun Corps.

Died of Wounds 3rd August 1917, Aged 19.

Buried Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery II. F. 7.

 

Eric was the son of Arthur & Harriet Ann North of 52 Margaret Street. Hamilton, Ontario. Born at Loughborough.

Private 15666 Percy North

 

7th Bn, Leicestershire Regiment.

Died at Home 21st November 1918,  Aged 28.                                                            

Buried Aylesbury Cemetery Buckinghamshire, Y. 56. 

 

Percy was the son of Absolam & Louisa North, of Loughborough, Husband of M. North, of 7 Beaconsfield Road, Aylesbury. He died of pneumonia at the Warwickshire Military Hospital Coventry. We sat and watched him day by day, Till all our hopes were vain; At length his heart grew still, death eased him from all pain. From his sorrowing Father, Brothers, and sisters.