Distinguished Service Medal (D.S.M.)

The D.S.M. was established on 14thOctober 1914.

It was an award for bravery whilst on active service at sea and was for other ranks' Royal Navy personnel, members of the other Services and other Commonwealth countries who held rank up to and including Chief Petty Officer.

On the reverse there was an inscription "For Distinguished Service". Bars were awarded for subsequent actions and the date of the action during the First World War was given on the reverse of the bar. Recipients of the medal are entitled to use the letters D.S.M. after their name.. 

 


Able Seaman 4926 John William Draycott D.S.M.

 

H.M.S. Gallipoli Opus                                                             

D.S.M. 6 July 1916.                                 

 

A Loughborough young man, John William Draycott, of the Royal Navy, has won the Distinguished Service Medal. The news has come to the knowledge of the parents long after the event. Mr. and Mrs., William Draycott of 58, Gladstone Street, Loughborough, received a short letter from their son just casually mentioning he had received his medal, and adding they knew all about it from his previous letter. The parents, who had not heard from their son since May, when he sent a postcard, however, have never received this letter. Draycott is 24 years of age, and after leaving school he was with the late Mr. Judges at the Church Gate School, he joined the Navy when nearly eighteen, so has been eight years in the service. His service has taken him into many foreign climes, and he was on the China Station when war broke out, having been there for two years. He saw service when our fleet co-operated with the with the Japanese in the subjugation of the German Chinese Colony at Kiao-Chau, and assisted at the fall of Tsing-Tau, the German fortress. Afterwards Draycott came to the Mediterranean station and was sent on a special service ship. He has also done service in the Dardanelles fighting. He is an only son, and his mother has a fine collection of post-cards and more elaborate gifts from her son, sent from foreign parts. Draycott has been through a course of gunnery instruction, but his parents do not know his proper description, whether gunner or able seaman.